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The Content Curation Conundrum: How To Strike a Balance Between Automated Aggregation and Manual Curation

The Content Curation Conundrum: How To Strike a Balance Between Automated Aggregation and Manual Curation | MEDIACLUB | Scoop.it

As usual, Robin Good sums up the situation correctly.

 

 

Robin Good: Many content curation tools promise to make your content publishing job easier, faster and better. But is it really so? Does less work and more automated aggregation/filtering guarantee a higher quality result?

 

Christa Carone writes on Fast Company: "New content curation tools make automating the job easier--but easy may not always be as effective.

 

It would be a mistake to let algorithms do the entire job for you. No one knows your audience like you do.

 

And, keeping the human touch in the process is more real, which is really important to today's info-overloaded consumer."

 

Yes, the human touch. Not the human click to rapidly share, repost or reblog. The human touch as in the act of adding value in ways that go beyond being someone who passes on interesting items.

 

And to achieve that, someone needs to manually stop, research, read, check and contribute something of value. it doesn't happen automatically.

 

"The companies that are truly winning over audiences and driving consumers are the ones that are experimenting with a balance of automated aggregation and human-directed curation.

 

It's a process of out-sourcing and in-sourcing.

 

I've been following Intel's approach. It recently launched iQ, an employee-curated digital magazine created to connect with a younger audience and share with them the bigger, living brand story.

 

Not only does the site provide original stories about tech, it also aggregates top tech stories from other sites that Intel's audience will find interesting... all closely watched by editor-in-chief Bryan Rhoades, who spurs conversations by judiciously placing some stories on the iQ homepage.


NASCAR, too, is experimenting in this space. A partnership with Twitter includes a site that compiles #NASCAR-related tweets from popular drivers, who send 140-character blasts from the track or wherever they may be-- along with those from sports writers and other industry folks.

 

They pull it off by using a search algorithm and human editors who understand narrative---and appropriate content."

 

Rightful. 7/10

 

Full article: http://www.fastcompany.com/1841964/the-content-conundrum-to-create-or-automate ;

 


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Create Topic Specific News Channels By Picking Your Favorite Twitter and FB Sources: NewsMix

Create Topic Specific News Channels By Picking Your Favorite Twitter and FB Sources: NewsMix | MEDIACLUB | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Similar to Paper.li, NewsMix.me allows anyone to easily create one or more news channels which automatically aggregate news and posts by your selected sources on Twitter (including "lists"), and Facebook.

You simply add the Twitter and FB accounts that you want to aggregate in a channel and your news channel is immediately created.

The look and feel of the final output is made up of a series of vertical blocks that showcase the tweet or FB content of each post and its related image.

 

P.S.: Unfortunately, rarely a Twitter stream or FB page is ever posting constantly on the same topic, making the aggregated result not as useful as it could be by allowing any source to be filtered for specific keywords.

 

Interesting. 7/10

 

Try it out:  http://newsmix.me/ 


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5 Reasons Content Discovery Tools Need a Human Touch

5 Reasons Content Discovery Tools Need a Human Touch | MEDIACLUB | Scoop.it

 

I really liked this article by Romain Goday from Darwin Ecosystem about content discovery tools and particularly the way he described the element of the "human touch" and why they go hand and hand.

 

His description of the human part of the equation eloquently describes the process of a content curation.

 

Intro:

 

Content discovery tools have been trending towards taking over an increasing part of the selection process by filtering out information.

 

Content Selection Should Remain a Vital Part of the User Experience

 

Excerpt:

 

While tools carry the advantage of computing and aggregating information quickly on the user’s behalf, the user possesses a number of natural skills that tools cannot adequately take the place of.

 

Here are a few of the most important ones, as they relate to selecting and identifying relevant content:

 

Users are contextual thinkers:

 

The relevance of a piece of information depends highly on the context of the informational need.

 

The motivation and goal of the user determines what information is important and what information is not.

 

Users possess relevant expertise: The user’s expertise helps them to predict the implications of a particular event.

 

It also allows the user to identify anomalies that take place in the usual development of an event based on their experience with the topic.

 

Users make sense of patterns: The human brain can easily understand the relationships between multiple events.

 

This ability to interpret patterns is critical to understand and identify what is going on and how it’s developing.

 

Curated by JanLGordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"

 

Read full article:  [http://bit.ly/sUQxGs]


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Good Theft vs. Bad Theft: Curation vs. Republishing Visualized

Good Theft vs. Bad Theft: Curation vs. Republishing Visualized | MEDIACLUB | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Here's a great visualization of how different can be the traits of content re-use. In the left column you can see what would appear to be the ideal traits of a professional curator, while on the right you can immediately recognize the ones of scrapers, republishers, cheap aggregators and other "thin" publishers as Google would call them.

 

I think it can serve as an excellent reference, when in doubt about whether you are still doing the right thing or not, when it comes to re-using and republishing other people content.

 

The table is part of an excellent presentation entitled "Link Building by Imitation" and authored by link building expert Ross Hudgens.

Truthful. 9/10

http://slideonline.com/presentation/94-link-building-by-imitation ;


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Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, June 10, 2012 5:19 PM
Robin,
I posted that my "curious discovery" of the score (84) of that topic, as another example which Guillaume and his team can take as evalutation to improve about it.
It was just a comparison with my score "83".

Btw; your "92" is well deserved! :-)
Robin Good's comment, June 10, 2012 5:21 PM
Hey Giuseppe, is not well deserved at all... it's a mistake :-). Just post twice a day consistently, like you used to, and you can get it too!
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, June 10, 2012 5:34 PM
Hi Robin,
we both are/use a "strict filter" about content that we are selecting, curating and sharing with our tribes! :-)
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Enterprise-Level Content Curation and Auto-Publishing: Lingospot

Enterprise-Level Content Curation and Auto-Publishing: Lingospot | MEDIACLUB | Scoop.it

Lingspot is an enterprise level content curation platform capable of automatic content aggregation, filtering and in-depth content editing.

 

The Lingspot platform is made up by two key components: 

The Mixer, which allows you to aggregate unlimited content sources via RSS or via direct API hookup and to filter them according to your own specific criteria. More info: http://corp.lingospot.com/products/algorithmicpublishing/mixer/  

 

The Editor, which makes it easy even for the non-technical publisher to turn the curated content streams into complete self-updating pages. More info: http://corp.lingospot.com/products/algorithmicpublishing/editor/ 

 

Key Features:

 

a) Through a variety of third party relationships, Lingospot can aggregate topic-targeted multimedia, including photos and videos from professional sources (such as the Associated Press, Bloomberg, NBC, CBS, Forbes, etc.), as well as user generated photos and video, such as from Flickr and YouTube.

 

b) Whether it's books on Amazon or auction items on eBay, Lingospot can aggregate product information related to a specific topic. This topic-specific merchandise can be purchased by your readers with only a few clicks.

 

c) Lingospot allows your readers to initiate a conversation about a specific topic on the page where you are aggregating content about the topic. This turns every Topic page created by Lingospot into a micro community, where readers can connect with other readers interested in that topic.

 

Key features and tech specifications: http://corp.lingospot.com/products/algorithmicpublishing/specs/ 

 

Case studies and examples and examples of companies using Lingospot: http://corp.lingospot.com/customers/casestudies/ 

 

Pricing: a basic account starts at $500/month.

See more info here: http://corp.lingospot.com/products/algorithmicpublishing/pricing/ 

 

 

Find out more: http://corp.lingospot.com/products/algorithmicpublishing/  

 

(Reviewed by Robin Good)


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