Media Psychology ...
Follow
1.4K views | +0 today
Media Psychology and Social Change
Media's impact on behavior
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

From neurons to hormones: understanding the biological triggers of our actions.

From neurons to hormones: understanding the biological triggers of our actions. | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
The neural communication systems is built on billions of interconnected cells called neurons which communicate by exchanging chemicals, most of which are triggered through electrical stimulation produced by specific stimuli.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:
Both systems create a sophisticated web of responses that affect our behaviors and the body’s homeostasis.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

WATCH: Rethinking the TV experience: Smart Thinking

WATCH: Rethinking the TV experience: Smart Thinking | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it

Smart Design has re-imagined the smart TV experience through a design concept that simplifies the technology and dials up the personalization. There’s no more channel surfing in search for something you like. It will be done for you, tailored to your tastes, moods and viewing behavior. That’s smart.

cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Now that we're starting to talk about balancing out our "media diets," what experiences are we willing to put up with when we decide to participate with technology. - the status quo experience or a highly engaging one?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Why we should pay more attention to our ability to focus - The Week Magazine

Why we should pay more attention to our ability to focus - The Week Magazine | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
The Week Magazine
Why we should pay more attention to our ability to focus
The Week Magazine
This is one reason I've changed my media consumption habits in 2014.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Our inability to resist checking email, Facebook, and Twitter rather than focus on the here and now leads to a real life out-of-office. Sociologist Erving Goffman, calls this "away," which tells other people "I'm not interested" in you right now. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Study: Consumers Punish Brands for Slow Twitter Response Time

Study: Consumers Punish Brands for Slow Twitter Response Time | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
A new study by Millward Brown Digital and Lithium found that consumers may reward brands who have a quick twitter response time. See results here.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:
When companies don’t meet these lofty response expectations, 38 percent feel more negative about the brand and a full 60 percent will take unpleasant actions to express their dissatisfaction.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
So yea, you know how the left brain is really realistic, analytical, practical, organized, and logical, and the right brain is so darn creative, passionate, sensual, tasteful, ...
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

The key to understanding the neuroscience of creativity lies not only in knowledge of large-scale networks, but in recognizing that different patterns of neural activations and deactivations are important at different stages of the creative process.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Are Online Tools the Future of Disaster Relief?

Are Online Tools the Future of Disaster Relief? | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
When disaster hits, many people break the news on Twitter or Facebook, often to inform loved ones that they're okay. During a crisis, social media users take on the responsibili...
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

How are these online sites — the actual forums through which people are conveying and distributing information — revolutionizing disaster response? And what others have emerged as a result?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Can Twitter Save Live TV?

Can Twitter Save Live TV? | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
A new study shows a correlation between tweet volume and TV ratings.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

If networks can figure out a way to get more people tweeting about their shows there might yet be a future for live televison

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
The new computing approach is based on the biological nervous system, specifically on how neurons react to stimuli and connect with other neurons to interpret information.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Computers have entered the age when they are able to learn from their own mistakes, a development that is about to turn the digital world on its head.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Facebook Wants to Know Why You’re Self-Censoring Your Posts

Facebook Wants to Know Why You’re Self-Censoring Your Posts | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
A couple of months ago, a friend of mine asked on Facebook: Do you think that facebook tracks the stuff that people type and then erase before hitting ? (or the “post” button) Good question.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Yikes!  Unfortunately, the code in your browser that powers Facebook still knows what you typed—even if you decide not to publish it.* It turns out that the things you explicitly choose not to share aren't entirely private.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Understanding consumer psychology: do consumers buy their culture or your convergence? | Blue Chip Magazine

Understanding consumer psychology: do consumers buy their culture or your convergence? | Blue Chip Magazine | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
Global process of convergence or divergence in consumer behaviour have seen much light in the debate of whether multi-national companies should maintain a (Understanding consumer psychology: do consumers buy their culture or your convergence?
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

The process of global divergence due to cultural consumption practises is further elaborated by the work of Greet Hofstede’s dimensions of national culture. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Surprising HeatData Patterns in Mobile Web Design

Surprising HeatData Patterns in Mobile Web Design | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it

"Patterns have emerged in various types of products that should inform how we design mobile web properties.

cyndi whitecotton's insight:

"Users tend to interact with certain ‘hot’ areas of mobile web pages given context and form factor, and calls-to-action can be optimized around this behavior. "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

2013 TV's Most Innovative Year In Decades

2013 TV's Most Innovative Year In Decades | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it

It took over 10 years for the U.S. to transition to color television broadcasts. It’s taking even longer for the world as a whole to standardize digital broadcast signals. Season episode count is still in constant debate. And we can’t decide if we should still be making pilots. The point is, as in any medium, technological (and business) innovation in television is slow. It always has been. It takes a long time for audiences to adapt to a new way of doing things on the small screen, and it takes even longer for the powers that be to do what the audiencewants. But with all the drastic ways television changed this year, 2013 might just go down as one of the most important years in the history of the medium.

 

The Rise of Digital Content

Did you watch House of Cards this year? How about Orange Is the New Black? Alpha House? Betas?Hemlock Grove? While watching any of them, did you know you were participating in a revolution? Well you were. Companies like Netflix and Amazon have been claiming for years they were going to start producing original content to make themselves competitive in the television landscape, little did we realize just how serious they were.

[Thinking about changing your digital services package? Click to compare offers from providers now.]

In less than a year, Netflix put out four original series that landed them not just some Emmy nominations, but ones that included categories such as best leading actor in a drama, best leading actor in a comedy, best leading actress in drama, and, oh yeah, best drama series. While certainly not the only players in the game (more on that in a moment), Netflix legitimized digital content, and through that legitimacy, changed a model as old as Walter Cronkite. The company completely subverted the way we consume television with their “everything at once” distribution model and have since been on an unheard of buying spree that shows no signs of slowing down.

The rise of digital distribution in 2013 also brought into existence something television’s never had before, an indie scene. Thanks to the likes of Freddie Wong and his web-series VGHS, Chris Hardwick and his Nerdistempire, and Mythbusters’ Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman’s Tested.com, we’re in a new age of off-beat programming not meant for the masses. It’s a wave not unlike the independent film scene of the 90s. Concepts that just aren’t marketable on a mass-scale are turned into niche properties that thrive with cultaudiences. Because of how airwaves once worked, something like this wasn’t possible outside of public access programming. But now with YouTube as its distributor, audiences are being exposed to a form of television they’ve never seen before. Television that doesn’t care about Nielsen data, commercial prices per second, or premium subscription fees. Television that is, for lack of a better word, cool.

Time-Shifting Takes Hold

We all know the steroid enhanced VCR that is DVR, and we all love it. We love how easy it’s become to use, and we love that it gives us full control over our watching schedule. But in the eyes of the networks, DVR’s never been a player. Rarely did series post live +3 and live +7 numbers that made any sort of difference in the ratings landscape. To the big guys, DVR was just a cool thing that audiences seemed to enjoy having… then 2013 happened.

[Click to compare cable, Internet, and phone packages from multiple providers now.]

DVR’s not only an audience favorite this year; it’s doing things people thought it would never achieve. Series like The Blacklist and Sleepy Hollow have continually broken ratings records since September, and they’ve sent a clear message to television networks: audiences want power over their content. But the effects of time-shifting don’t stop with set-top boxes. Audiences are now bypassing television providers all together and instead are just watching shows online (more on that in a bit as well). It’s a shift that’s been so dramatic that Nielsen’s been forced to not only redefine what qualifies as a television viewer, but in 2014 they have to start counting them in their daily ratings reports.

While time-shifting hasn’t completely destroyed live viewing, it’s certainly struck a blow this year. Not just with audiences, but with providers as well. 2013 changed the way networks think about ratings, and audiences can pat themselves on the back knowing they’re 100% the reason it matters now. The question today isn’t if people are going to continue watching television this way, it’s can the old-model survive the shift?

Conclusions

Syndication was once about affiliates and cable networks. It was about 100 and done. Not now. In 2013, syndication is about endings. In a way, this relates back to the model-changing business practices being employed by Netflix, and the effects of time-shifted viewing. Digital distributors have made series conclusions matter in a big way because it’s where audiences are going to binge-watch series they either missed or want to catch up on at a later date. But because people are far more interested in a completed story than they are in an incomplete one, the shows they watch need to have conclusions if there’s any hope of making them valuable properties in the long run.

[Time to change your digital service provider? Click to see other providers in your area now.]

2013 saw/will see endings for programs such as Breaking Bad, Dexter, Futurama, Burn Notice, Nikita,Fringe, Last Resort, Spartacus, 90210, The Office, and 30 Rock. Five years ago we’d be lucky if the number was half that amount. Conclusions matter in 2013 because they matter to the business model, and that’s why it belongs on the list of reasons why 2013 matters so much to the medium as a whole. Thanks to changes in the business of what qualifies as valuable, we’re being given an opportunity to see our favorite characters ride off into the sunset… or die on the cold floor of a meth lab, either way. Audience members have at least somesecurity now that the hope of seeing their favorite shows end the way they deserve will actually happen, and that’s all they’ve ever wanted.

New Ways To Experience

Thanks to the likes of smart phones, tablets, PCs, and even movie theaters, television isn’t just about the TV anymore. Audiences have not only taken control of when they watch television, but also how, and not just for fictional programming. Major league sports and news organizations alike have taken to these new delivery systems in order to stay up to date with the demands of their audience.

Unlike its celluloid cousin, television is a medium that’s adapted perfectly into its new delivery system. Networks today understand they must now go to where the audience is in order to survive, and they’ve started offering their programs for free in a big way to mobile watchers. Some have even gone so far as to release apps that allow viewers to watch the channel live if they have an active cable or satellite subscription. In addition to that, thanks to third-party services like Hulu, Amazon and iTunes, the sky’s the limit on what devices people can, and will watch their favorite shows on.

You want to watch the latest episode of Game of Thrones on your iPad while running on the treadmill? Have at it. You want to watch that LA Kings game on the Amtrak from New York City to Boston? Give it a go. The technological advancements of cell phone reception and WiFi in 2013 has freed us from the one thing that was truly holding television back, the TV itself. We can now take Walter White and Rick Grimes anywhere we go. The medium is ours to control in 2013, and in just about every aspect we could have desired.

[Don't miss your favorite show again. Click to find the right cable and Internet package now.]

Overview

Innovation is a cruel beast. Even when the future is obvious, it can sometimes take a lifetime to see a new vision achieved. But there are also times when a populous realizes from the word go that innovation is in their best interest. It’s rare, but it happens, and 2013 was one of those times for the medium of television.

The art of the small screen has been evolving since the invention of the medium itself. It’s brought us together in times of tragedy, it’s taken us to worlds that once only existed in our dreams, and it’s shown us thatsometimes we need to be reminded of where our moral compass lies. But both the story and business innovations that made these things possible have always been atop a slow moving train. All too often,audiences are forced to wait years, sometimes decades to get what they want out of the medium they love. But not this year. This year, to quote a certain mutant professor, evolution leaped forward.  If for nothing else, 2013 will go down as one of the most important years in the medium’s history simply because it’s one of the few times audiences came first, and business came second.

 

 

cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Did you watch House of Cards this year? How about Orange Is the New Black? Alpha House? Betas?Hemlock Grove? While watching any of them, did you know you were participating in a revolution? Well you were. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Breaking the silence: social media’s impact on the way we grieve

Breaking the silence: social media’s impact on the way we grieve | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
After losing a loved one, it's not uncommon for social media users to express their grief on social media platforms. In light of that, counselors say the digital world is adding new dimensions to the grieving process.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Just days after Actor Paul Walker's death, fans take to social media to grieve together: http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/trending-now/fans-share-personal-paul-walker-photos-182357237.html?vp=1

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

To Make Healthier Choices, Color-Code Your Food (Green Means Go!)

To Make Healthier Choices, Color-Code Your Food (Green Means Go!) | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it

UsiColor-coding food by healthfulness really does steer people toward better choices, researchers say.

cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Using street light concepts to help you make better eating choices.  My question - Can you get a ticket for blasting through the red?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Fonts That Create Emotions, and More – Roger’s Picks | Neuromarketing

Fonts That Create Emotions, and More – Roger’s Picks | Neuromarketing | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
We’re trying something new here at Neuromarketing – a quick digest of interesting articles we found this week. Expect an eclectic mix of marketing, neuroscience, psychology, digital, and stuff that doesn’t fit in any of those categories. Cat videos, too! […]
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Wonderful share by Roger Dooley as he introduces Mikael Cho's great insights on the science behind fonts.  Cho also provides examples of websites that are yoga studios for content.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

22 Social Media Facts and Statistics You Should Know in 2014 - Jeffbullas's Blog

22 Social Media Facts and Statistics You Should Know in 2014 - Jeffbullas's Blog | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
There was a tipping point last year. It has implications for publishing and marketing. Here are some social media facts and statistics to kick off 2014
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

How to use social proof to increase conversions

How to use social proof to increase conversions | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
Social proof is perhaps the most well known of Robert Cialdini’s six keys to persuasion explained in his 2009 book titled “Influence”.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

We use the actions of others to decide on proper behavior for ourselves especially when we view those others to be similar to ourselves (Park, 2001).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Music psychology and Big Data

Music psychology and Big Data | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it

music psychology will also face many new challenges that come with the march of advancing technology. One such challenge that you may be familiar with is ‘Big Data’.

 
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Big data can teach us about the musical past. It can provide a method for studying historical trends in musical development. 

more...
NoahData's curator insight, January 24, 2:47 AM

Music psychology and Big Data | @scoopit via @znmeb http://sco.lt/...http://bit.ly/1bjG2Dx

Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Are You Addicted to Your Cell Phone?

Are You Addicted to Your Cell Phone? | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
Is it cell phone addiction or normal social interaction?
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

 Not surprisingly, many individuals consider their phones to be part of their self concept. Identifying your cell phone as part of your self predicts not simply how frequently people use their phones, but also their involvement with their phones. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Global Social Media Impact Study

cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Ignore glib claims that we are all becoming more superficial or more virtual. What is really going on is far more incredible. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Do You Really Know What Social Media Is?

Do You Really Know What Social Media Is? | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
Below is an except from my soon to be released Social Media Book Tweet Naked. Social media is as appropriately named as any invention since the automobile, which automatically made you mobile.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:
By participating in social media, you become a form of media.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Social Brain, Social Mind

Social Brain, Social Mind | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it

Is Facebook Ruining Our Brains? Will iPhones and iPads change who we are?

cyndi whitecotton's insight:

According to Matthew Lieberman "Facebook and Twitter allow us to communicate with so many more people at once. You can make interesting connections with people that never would have happened without the internet, but digital media can become a diversion from other kinds of social interactions that are essential to our well-being. "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

“Fear Appeals” An online persuasion booster? ‹ Online Persuasion

“Fear Appeals” An online persuasion booster? ‹ Online Persuasion | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it

Advertising based on fear appeals usually paint a picture of what your life will look like if you don’t buy their product. They usually play into existing fears (accidents, hurricanes, flooding, being under-insured, etc.). Or they try to create new fears for you you never even thought off.

cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Research has shown that these fear appeals usually do not work. Why not? Because people direct their attention away from the fear appeal message.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Behavior Flow: Better Insights, Better Marketing

Behavior Flow: Better Insights, Better Marketing | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
While there are thousands of different pieces of data available in Google Analytics, unfortunately there aren’t thousands of hours in each month for us to slice and dice this data into something useful.
cyndi whitecotton's insight:

Behavior flow gives a nice visualization that can be used to show clients or coworkers where the content is failing and where the message needs to be changed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by cyndi whitecotton
Scoop.it!

Perceptions of Social Media/Networking Sites

Perceptions of Social Media/Networking Sites | Media Psychology and Social Change | Scoop.it
We asked consumers which of 29 descriptors best fit the social media/networking sites they use.  Then using correspondence analysis, we mapped the results among a representative sample of 18-34 yea...
more...
No comment yet.