Aspect 1: Nuclear Power and the Future
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Colton Sisson's comment, February 19, 2014 10:27 AM
In the United States we use two different reactor designs, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the boiling water reactor (BWR) which are light water reactors. The PWR uses two closed loops of water to transfer the heat. The primary coolant loop contains the pressurized water and transfers the heat into the steam generator. The steam generator is where both loop systems meet and the heat transfer occurs and steam is created. The steam is then goes through the steam line and into the turbine generator. The exhaust from the turbine is then sent to the condenser and converted back to water.
Colton Sisson's comment, February 19, 2014 10:29 AM
The boiling water reactor uses a single loop system where water is fed into the reactor core and absorbs the heat. It does this as it rises through the core until it is eventually made into steam. It then moves to the turbine and after passing through it is led into a condenser to return to water.
Colton Sisson's comment, February 19, 2014 10:31 AM
The new Gen 3+ designs are based off of these two systems. The other designs used around the world are going to be replaced by this incoming generation of reactors.
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Colton Sisson's comment, February 18, 2014 10:01 AM
We are currently building the next generation of nuclear technology, Generation 3+, which has numerous improvements in safety to help prevent meltdowns. The new generation uses Passive Safety Systems, this does not require AC power to provide safety functions. They also rely on gravity, natural convection, evaporation, and materials resistant to high temperatures.
Colton Sisson's comment, February 18, 2014 10:03 AM
Gen 3+ has also improved on previous designs with the use of modern construction which helps to reduce overall cost and with increased burn-up which reduces both the amount of fuel needed and the amount of spent fuel.
Colton Sisson's comment, February 18, 2014 10:06 AM
We are already looking toward the future of nuclear design past Generation 3+. Generation 4 is expected to be avaliable by the year 2030. Generation 4 takes the improvements made in Gen 3+ even further and is going to be geared towards making nuclear power a viable, clean and safe energy source for the future.
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Nuclear Energy | Clean Energy | US EPA

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Colton Sisson's comment, February 17, 2014 10:01 AM
Nuclear energy comes from splitting of uranium atoms, this is called fission. Fission is a chemical process in shich energy is released and used to make steam. Steam then turns the turbine which turns the generator which generates electricity.
Colton Sisson's comment, February 17, 2014 10:02 AM
In the process of generating the electricity there is no air emissions released. The biggest waste product is the radioactive waste from the decaying uranium and the damage it does to the equipment around it.