Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety
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YAY MATH! Algebra Geometry Math Videos Online | Homework Help

YAY MATH! Algebra Geometry Math Videos Online | Homework Help | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it
The YAY MATH video project is a free service dedicated to meeting the growing need for math success in a POSITIVE, LIVELY, and CONFIDENCE BOOSTING way.
Julie Price's insight:

Although the videos and resources on this website are geared towards high school math, I think that all educators can learn a lot by watching his videos. This teacher takes math anxiety head on and tackles it in an unusual and creative way. Although I do not think that I would be able to dress up in costumes for math lessons, especially because math is in the middle of our day, I think the high positive energy and principles behind yaymath are great. I want to bring his kind of energy and positivity to my math lessons to help students feel comfortable and excited to learn math. In his TedxTalk video about math anxiety he stated that the first step to becoming successful at math, is overcoming the anxiety that many people associate with it. I think that he has done a great job in his classroom doing this and I hope that I can find something of this level that is more applicable to an elementary school math setting to work for my students.

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Math Help ,algebra, study skills, homework help, mathpower

Math Help ,algebra, study skills, homework help, mathpower | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it

Via Kristina-Maria Paspalis
Julie Price's insight:

This website is useful for a number of reasons. It has a lot of great resources for math in general, but also has a whole section for math anxiety. It allows students to take a math anxiety quiz and gives them helpful tips on how to combat the anxiety. I like the idea of adding rules about math time to the general classroom rules at the beginning of the year. I think that this would set the tone for math time for the rest of the year and let students know that its ok. Providing students with this resource would really empower them to take charge of their own learning. It also supports their metacognition because they are thinking about how they are thinking and feeling about math and why they feel this way. Metacognition is a big focus in MCPS right now and is even a grade on the report card, so this website really lends itself to our new curriculum.

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Kristina-Maria Paspalis's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:50 PM
The one part of this resource that I really like is that it is kid friendly. The math anxiety bill of rights and the math anxiety test are designed for students to use as resources themselves. This puts the idea of correcting math anxiety and fears in the hands if the students, which will make them more in control of their learning and their work. Since this website is geared towards the higher grades given the language the author uses, I think it could be adapted for younger students such as my second graders. The math Bill of Rights can become an anchor chart (with easier terminology) that can be reviewed with the kids during the first week of school, when norms and rules are designed. This is an easy way to integrate math into a regular school day, where students can become more interested in the content right from the start. This is also a great way to create a more relaxed and focused learning environment, by allowing students to accept their math anxiety. In this way, a teacher is essentially providing them with the tools they need to address it as they see fit or as they are most comfortable. To fit this into my placement, my mentor uses a number of anchor charts that give students guidance, such as how to not be stressed and how to deal with worries. They are posted around the room in places where the students frequent and I find that they are more likely to read the posters instead of listen to my mentor talk about the same information. Putting the math anxiety Bill of Rights will benefit my students, especially if they see that it is relevant to their own lives. In reading this resource, I also changed my perspective on how to deal with math anxiety. Letting students deal with things on their own is not something that I usually advocate. I think that at a young age, students are not able to make decisions about their lives but reading this article helped me see that if presented in the right way, a teacher can let the students handle their own problems with the proper guidance. This website offers exactly that, and can most definitely benefit students of all ages.
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Learning Math Without the Anxiety

Discipline, Tools for Teaching, positive discipline, classroom management, staff development, professional development, new teacher training, Title One, new teacher induction, teacher training, effective teaching, teacher workshops, no child left ...


Via Kristina-Maria Paspalis
Julie Price's insight:

This website has great tips for teachers to help alleviate math anxiety in students. The article discusses the importance of creating a stress free learning zone during math time. This takes the pressure off of students and allows them to work through problems and practice without the fear of being penalized for making a mistake. It also talks about how important it is for teachers to be coaches. This means that we need to guide students and give them plenty of practice time before they are expected to perform on their own. As a new teacher I will strive to incorporate the tips from this article into my teaching.

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Kristina-Maria Paspalis's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:20 PM

The attitude of a student towards math is what causes math anxiety, according to this article which gives reasons and preventative measures that teachers can take. Perhaps the suggestion that I can relate with the most is the corrective feedback on an individual basis. The article says how math anxiety can spawn from negative experiences regarding individual feedback, but in my language arts methods course, we have discussed meeting individually with students and the attitudes and approaches we must take when doing writing conferences. I see no reason why this cannot apply to math as well. The way in which I approached all of my mini lessons--and how I will use math corrective feedback in the future to prevent math anxiety--is by doing exactly what the article states. Instead of focusing on the wrong parts only, students must have their correct work acknowledged and praised just as much. For a math problem, if a student makes one error, pointing it out and talking only about that individually will cause the student to panic and worry each time they are doing a problem. Part of doing math is making mistakes, and having an irrational fear of doing so is created from our emphasis on what is "correct". The process must be discussed, including the right aspects so that students can feel more comfortable completing problems without anxiety and fears. This article pointing out this point makes me very happy, and I will take what I learned from this and my methods class on attitudes to fuel the math learning next semester.

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Counting on the Common Core - Delmarva Now

Counting on the Common Core - Delmarva Now | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it
Milford Mirror Counting on the Common Core Delmarva Now Educators also know that without a deep conceptual understanding of mathematics, students may be able to pass a math test at one point in time; however, over time, the same students may forget...
Julie Price's insight:

This article is a great read for all teachers and aspiring teachers about how the new common core math curriculum is going to make math more accessible for students. It discusses the many different ways that the new common core allows for students to build a deeper understanding in problem solving skills. This means that teachers will no longer be giving students the "right way" to solve a problem, but rather giving students the tools and strategies and letting them choose what works best for them. It also involves including real world applications for students to help engage them and make the math they are learning meaningful. These are the types of activities I am going to focus on in my math classroom.

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4 Ways Parents Can Encourage Math Skills At Home - Edudemic

4 Ways Parents Can Encourage Math Skills At Home - Edudemic | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it
It's one thing to get students excited about math in the classroom. But what about learning math skills at home? Here are some tips for parents!

Via commoncore2014@gmail.com, Rebecca Siegel
Julie Price's insight:

I think that this is an awesome resource for parents about the new Common Core State Standards. It provides great ideas for ways that math can be accessible at home. I will use this in my classroom to give to parents as a resource. It also has some good ideas that we as teachers could consider using as meaningful homework assignments. I really like how this resource points out the shift in mathematical thinking and how it is important for parents to be aware of it.

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Rebecca Siegel's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:24 AM

With the new Common Core coming into play, all lessons should tie into problem solving and exploring outside of the classroom.  I hope to use this website to assist parents in helping their children (my students) discover math at home.  By observing math around them, students will no longer think that learning math is just in our textbook, but that they can find it all around them!

Madeline Morgan's curator insight, November 12, 2013 9:45 PM

Making math meaningful inside the classroom is very helpful but extending this to outside the classroom is important as well. For math homework in my future classroom I want it to be things that the students can do at home. This article gives great ways that parents can help at home to make math meaningful. The article gives examples of just being positive and practicing math skills with their child, but I really like the section that discussed how parents can use activites like baking, bills, and sports to work with their child on math. This sparked an idea for my future classroom by encouraging parents to look at everyday activities and having their child work on math y completing these simple everyday activities. An example of this could be when baking have the student get out and measure all the ingredients. The parent could ask the student why he or she got out that certain amount and how he or she knew that they got the correct amount. An activity like this is not only fun for the parent and child, but it is also a great way to show the student that math can be found outside of the classroom, it can even be found at home. By the student/child seeing that even their parent deals with math on a regular basis will open their eyes to math in a whole new way. By building meaningful math skills at home, this will then transfer into the classroom and allow the students to see that what they are learning is very important and meaningful.

Kay Clarke's curator insight, December 12, 2013 6:44 PM

This post reminded me of one of our assignments in class this semester where Dr. Bote had us design homeowrk assigments that could get some parental involvement with how the assignments were designed.  I thought this post had some great ideas about how to do this.  With Curriculum 2.0 in MCPS, I've noticed that my 5th grade team has struggled with generating HW assignments that can realte to the real world.  By getting parents involved, students may be able to start seeing math in the real world.  I especially liked the "Talk Math" idea.  As a future teacher, I think this strategy in particular will be something that I will call upon next year at Back to School Night when I address my parents.  

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Chinese Restaurant Prices and Problems - Resources - Share My Lesson

Chinese Restaurant Prices and Problems - Resources - Share My Lesson | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it
Price list and associated addition and subtraction word problems to practice written calculation methods and calculations with money.All sheets are easily adaptable to change prices and names as appropriate.
Julie Price's insight:

I thought that these resources would be great for making meaningful homework assignments that would allow students to see the real world applications for math. These could even be used in the classroom as activities. I like that you can even change the name of the restaurant and the prices to match local restaurants, which also allows for an authentic context.

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Conquering Math Anxiety - The Power of Yay Math: Robert Ahdoot at TEDxAJU

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TED...

Via Esther Kang
Julie Price's insight:

This is a very powerful talk that every educator should watch. I never thought about the physiological affects that anxiety has on our body and how it affects our ability to do math. He talks about the problem of people "blanking out" and the implications it has for students. I see this happen to my students frequently throughout different math lessons. I never made the connection before watchng this video that "the blanking effect" had to do with math anxiety because I thought that when students were rasing their hands they were not nervous. One of the most important points that I think he makes in this video is that math needs to be positive and fun to help alleviate students stress and allow them to feel comfortable. "If anxiety and fear equals no math, then laughter and fun equals yay math." He also states that math needs to be genuine and authentic for students. This goes along with what we have been talking about this semester in our class. Genuine and authentic math not only engages students, it helps relieve their stress and anxiety

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Esther Kang's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:45 PM

"It's not the math itself that we hate, we hate that we don't know it. And that's what I try to tell my students."  This TED talk speaks to all the people in the world that suffer from this "math anxiety".  He says that we need to really see the beauty of math first.  I think that is so true that if students are able to see how useful and beautiful math can be, students will learn to love math and develop the desire to learn math.  

The speaker touches upon the "blanking out" sensation where students just forget their train of thought because of the fear of being judged by their peers or teachers.  We see this in our classroom many times and we have experienced this as students ourselves.  He says that math is supposed to be "fun, funny, authentic and unscripted".  When students are able to enjoy their learning, this learning will become something that they are not fearful of, but be something that they love to do.

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Calming Math Anxiety in Elementary School Students

Calming Math Anxiety in Elementary School Students
Julie Price's insight:

This article had some great points about math anxiety that I have not thought about before. It talks about how girls tend to have more math anxiety than boys. It is important to keep this in mind as a teacher because we need to make sure that all of our students are feeling comfortable in the classroom. This website also offered interactive online lessons for students to learn math in an anxiety free environment. Although I would not have students complete these lessons, they provide good resources for interactive activities to do with students that I could use in my lessons.

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The Causes and Prevention of Math Anxiety

The Causes and Prevention of Math Anxiety | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it

A great article by noted author Marilyn Curtain-Phillips on the causes and prevention of math anxiety.


Via Kristina-Maria Paspalis
Julie Price's insight:

This is really helpful for me as a developing teacher to read about the causes of math anxiety. I now have a deeper understanding of how and why students develop math anxiety and why it is so important to stop the cycle of anxiety in the primary grades. I want math time to be something my students look forward to, not something they dread and fear. This article suggests including cartoons, humor, pictures, and other things relatable to students when introducing a topic so that the math is being connected to something that students enjoy. It also states that allowing students to work in cooperative pairs greatly reduces math anxiety because students can use each other's ideas and talk through the math as they are practicing it. We often allow students to work in pairs in my placement classroom and I can  already see how this time benefits students. The article also says that allowing younger students to use manipulatives helps alleviate math anxiety in students while also allowing them to see abstract concepts in a concrete way. I will use many of these useful tips to relieve math anxiety in students.

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Kristina-Maria Paspalis's curator insight, September 30, 2013 10:03 PM

This article discusses how students who are active learners have more success with math than those who are passive. This makes sense because students who feel confident and in control of math will take a active role in their studies. Another technique for fighting math anxiety is aging cooperative learning groups. My mentor teacher has used groups and pairs to explore math, and I have observed that the students often are more active and more comfortable when this occurs. In addition, making math relevant has been shown to reduce anxiety because the students can make connections to their own lives, thus reducing stress from learning from textbooks. When I was reading this article, I realized that it also connects to things we have discussed in our methods class. Making math more meaningful by catering the methods of instruction to the different learning styles can include using manipulatives for kinesthetic learners and visual representations for visual learners. By making math more accessible in terms of the learning styles, math anxiety can be reduced.

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Reaching Students: 18 Simple Ways To Make A Lasting Impact On Your Students

Reaching Students: 18 Simple Ways To Make A Lasting Impact On Your Students | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it
Reaching Students: 18 Simple Ways To Make A Lasting Impact On Your Students, including ideas, tips, and strategies.

Via Madeline Morgan
Julie Price's insight:

I love this website. I think that it provides so many important points and great tips for developing a positive and lasting relationship with students. One of the points that I really like from this article is knowing what to overlook. I think that not pointing out every mistake a child makes is important, especially in math. Instead we need to try to help students redirect their thinking so that they can learn through their mistakes and work through the process. I am going to keep as many of these tips in mind when I am developing a safe and inviting learning community in my classroom. Another important point that this article makes in the importance of "modeling the challenge of convention." This is important as we move to CCSS because they way that we are teaching students math and the way that they are learning it are much different than what was traditionally done in the past. I think all teachers should read this article.

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Madeline Morgan's curator insight, December 2, 2013 9:08 AM

When I found this website I knew that it was not geared towards math, but the ideas shown on this website can be used in all subjects in the classroom. While teaching math to the students I believe the way the students feel and the classroom environment as a whole has a huge impact on how student's learn. If teachers make connections with their students and are able to make them comfortable the learning and teaching will be much easier. From this article I really liked the section that said, "Tell stories. Everybody loves a story. Tell them—in a way that is natural and comfortable for you—and students will begin to see you in three dimensions, as a full human being interacting with them for their own intellectual growth." I love this and plan to use this in my future classroom and math classroom. As a student I always loved when my teachers gave me a story to compare my learning to. It always helped my thinking. In my math classroom when teaching, I want to give my students stories and real world examples that will help them understand. This will not only show the students that math takes place outside of school, but it will help them making meaning of what they are learning. Building a strong relationship with your student's it critical in order to teach them any subject. In math this is very important because student's usually have a poor relationship with math. For example, they do not like it. As educators if we can get students to build a healthy relationship with their teachers, peers, and the subject at hand the learning will come much easier.

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How to Fall in Love With Math - New York Times

How to Fall in Love With Math - New York Times | Making Math Meaningful and Accessible and Relieving Math Anxiety | Scoop.it
How to Fall in Love With Math
New York Times
BALTIMORE — EACH time I hear someone say, “Do the math,” I grit my teeth.

Via Corinne Tomaszewski
Julie Price's insight:

I love this article and I think that it highlights a lot of what we have talked about in our math methods course. Changing the focus of math from just mundane arithmitic to broader, project based types of assignments would really open students eyes to how fun and creative math can be. I think that the new curriculum 2.0 in MCPS is a step in this direction with math. I want to create the culture of learning described in this article in my classroom and make math time fun AND meaningful at the same time. It was also interesting to read some of the other comments made to the editor. They show that we are really at a crossroads with how people believe math should be taught in schools.

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Rebecca Siegel's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:51 PM

Thanks to Corinne, this interesting article sums up the most commonly asked question in math..."When will I really use this?"  So many students find the traditional way of learning math to be boring and useless, feeling that it does not connect to the real world, myself included at times!  These ideas need to be broken and this great article talks about how to cause students to fall in love with math, in turn, making it more meaningful and useful in their lives.  Through our developing technology, there are so many awesome resources that can be used to create interest in students eyes including animations, videos, manipulatives, and overall just connecting the ideas being taught to real life situations for students.

Kristina-Maria Paspalis's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:43 PM

I found this great article on Rebecca's Scoop It page, and I am so glad that I did! I hope that by scooping it on my page, more interns can find this and engage in a reading that will enlighten them on how to make math more meaningful. I gained perspective by reading this article because I never really thought about how people say "Do the math", and how that compares to other subjects. I have been musically inclined my entire life, and not once have I ever heard my many private music teachers tell me to "do the music" during our lessons. I presume this is because music is something that cannot be done, and math is exactly the same way. You can't do something that you don't understand, and the key to understanding is developing at least some level of respect for it, if you will. Students must be given the opportunity to see the value of math for what it is instead of thinking about math in terms of worksheets and mindless activities. The key to falling in love with math as the article states, is having a context where you can develop your own understanding. Just like with music, everyone interprets math differently, but each person develops their own understanding of it based on this. I think this is a really deep concept and I am just beginning to scratch the surface of this idea. 

Laura Jane's curator insight, December 15, 2013 11:32 PM

As Corinne and Rebecca have already stated, this article delves deeper into the recurring question: "When will I actually use this??" So frequently, I catch myself being unable to explain how to perform a mathematical operation because it was so ingrained in my head HOW to do it, but now WHY we do it. It's hard to think of ways to mix up math, because it is one thing that has changed very little for hundreds of years. This article discusses that students perceive the traditional paper and pencil method of learning math as boring... Who can blame them?? We have way to many resources, and technology is too readily available, for our math lessons to be outdated and monotonous. This article offers many ideas for making students "fall in love with math," and I think the first step is for us to fall in love with it ourselves, as teachers.