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Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely?

Kashmir: Nuclear war between India and Pakistan likely? | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Month after his meeting with Manmohan Singh, Nawaz Sharif said nuclear war is likely between India, Pakistan over Kashmir. He will meet Barack Obama in US.

Via Al Picozzi
Meagan Harpin's insight:

Kashmir is a hot spot in the world  whith the two powers involved having nuclear weapons and both are willing say they are still on the table for a conflict.  

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 12, 2013 8:00 PM

Kashmir is still a hot spot in the world especially when thw two powers involved but have nuclear weapons and both seem willing to at least say they are still on the table in any conflict.  A long problem starting back when lines were drawn on the map by Imperial Britain.  Much like in Africa, however, nukes, at least as far as we know, are not on the table in Africa....yet.

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Complexity in Syria

Complexity in Syria | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

Syria is a complicated country as you can see from this map. The map shows the different ethnic and linguistic groups of Syria, and many of the groups are swirled together. The brown areas represent the Kurds who have been long oppresed, there are also Druze and  Arab Christians, Armenians and others. Syria is run by the Alawites which is the greenish grey color they may only be 12% of the population but they are a massive part of the war. Many people believe that the war began for political reasons but spiraled into old divisons deeper and more vicious.  

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:19 PM

This map shows tha tthere are an overwhelimg amount of Arabs especially in centeral Syria. And then on the coast lline it is mostly mixed with pink representing the overwhlming other majority.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 2014 8:11 PM

It appears from this article that Syria is a complicated country. The map shows the different ethnic and religious groups of Syria, along with other groups, all of which live within a small area. Syria, along with other countries within the Middle East have been faced with one serious issue or another. Many different people live within a very small area; those people practice different religions and are ethnically and culturally different. Unfortunately, being different in this part of the world may get you killed.   

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 1:25 PM

Maps such as this one are very valuable when trying to understand conflict.  In Syria and the greater Levant area, unbalanced power and representation in politics is the result of many different religious and ethnic groups living in such close proximity each other, allowing conflict to become very invasive.

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
The weird, violent history of the Indo-Pakistani border.

 

Geography rarely makes sense without the added lens of history.  This fantastic article chonicles the history of the geopolitical conflict between India and Pakistan, centering on the disputed Kashmir region.  This border is tied into colonial, cultural, political and religious layers of identity.  As one of the great unresolved issues of the colonial era, this standoff may loom large as India becomes increasingly significant on the global scale.     


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani? 

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:41 PM

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.

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Cuban Missile Crisis - John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

Cuban Missile Crisis - John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it

Via Al Picozzi
Meagan Harpin's insight:

A look back at a scary time during October 1962 when the US and USSR where close to a nuclear missle war. It was filled with days of nuclear safety drills and fear of the unknown while Kennedy worked hard to get the situation under control.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 24, 2013 10:39 PM

Just a look back of what the relations were in the 1960s and how close the US and the USSR came to full blown nuclear war.  I asked both my parents what it was like in 1962 during this time.  Both of them said it was a scary time.  Nuclear attack drills daily when this was going on in October 1962.  This area so close to the US geographically made a huge difference even though the Soviets had missles that could reach the US from Russia and elswhere in Europe.  It was the fact that there would be so little warning of a launch and that it was right in our "back yard"...remember the Monroe Doctrine.  Kennedy invoked its use in order to stop the missiles.  But now times have changed..see my next scoop...

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 25, 2013 11:22 AM

The Cuban Missle Crisis was a very scary moment for the world and is a very blatant example of how the US managed/used coersion in their relationships with Latin American countries during the Cold War. Geographically, the fall of Cuba to communism was a huge blow to the United States because it represented a severe military threat. The US sought to control all of South America and democratize it in the Cold War because of its geographically strategic position to the US.

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

For 17 years she was known as nothing more than the Afgan girl today we now her name, Sharbat Gula. Sharbat is part of one of the most Afghan warlike tribes known as Pashtun. It is said that the Pashtun are only at peace when they are at war. She was just a child when the fighting began, and six when her parents were killed by a bombing. Her brother said they left Afghanistan because of the fighting and with their grandmother they walked for a week to Pakistan. Today she is married and takes care of her three daughters her brother says she has never known a happy day in her life. The girl known for 17 years as the Afghan girl has lied a lived of hard ship and tragedy.     

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 2014 3:49 PM

The image of the Afghan Girl is easily recognizable and greatly popular, even to those born after it was made the cover of an issue of National Geographic.   It is mind boggling that the Afghan Girl had no idea she was on the cover of one the most notable publications of our time.  It is disheartening that they sought to find her so long after the fact.  I can only imagine how much money that image drew in, and how little she received for being the muse.  The image now is still just as powerful, if not even more powerful.  Her experiences have taken their toll and it is evident.  Her eyes still are haunting, this time less with beauty and more with hardship.  The photos of her show that images can sometimes convey emotions and meaning far more than words ever could.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

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From Victim to (Mutual) Aggressor: South Sudan's Disastrous First Year

From Victim to (Mutual) Aggressor: South Sudan's Disastrous First Year | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
The new African country, founded in part to escape from the northern government's violence, is showing some hostility of its own.

 

Independence for ethnic/religious groups, while culturally satisfying, does not necessarily solve all the problems within a region.  South Sudan's 1-year anniversary shows that even though they have a short history, it has been marked by ineffective governance and social instability.  


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

The fighting between the Republic of Sudan and south Sudan belongs to a different category of armed conflict, a product of internal politics and external pressures suspisons both real and imagined that launched an uncontrollable war, a war that could have been prevented.   

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 28, 2013 11:53 PM

This shows that gaining your independence might be hard, but the actual creation of the new state is harder.  Sometimes the new governement will impose the same methods the old "mother" country used that caused the split int he first place.  They need to ask themselves the hard questions about their actions: Are we turing into the old country?  Are we swapping one repressive and agressvie government for another?  Again one needs to look to the past, learn form it and not make the same mistakes..or else what I like saying...history will repeat itself.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:32 PM

This is probably a bad comparison, but say an expansion sports team has just been created for the new upcoming season.  There are new players, new equipment, and new managers to run the team.  Many of these new areas probably have little to no experience with each other professionally, so therefore flaws are inevitable.  In a way, the only way to go is up and mistakes which surely will be made can be used to change for the better in the future.  That being said, a new country with new officals, flags, and economy to name a few are all in a "trial run."  No one should expect them to suddenly become prosperous and great over a few years span.  Just like a new team, a country takes time to develop, people to gain comfort, and regulations and norms for people to follow.  I mean, even Rome wasn't built in a day.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:39 PM

This war could have been prevented. The Republic of Sudan and South Sudan are fighting over problems that may or may not exist.  Independence does not always solve the problems within a region, as shown in the case of South Sudan.