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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

Challenging but very fun!

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 11, 2013 11:27 AM
http://ocean.si.edu
Eric Raposo's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:28 AM

Very inteesting to see if on could guess where places are :)

Maegan Connor's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:06 PM

This is the next best alternative to exploring the world right now.

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A Barrier to Peace

A Barrier to Peace | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it

"Why would they want to pull down these walls?” asks William Boyd mildly as he offers me a cup of tea in his home at Cluan Place, a predominantly Loyalist area of east Belfast.

 

These walls, orginally installed in the late 60s to protect Belfast residents during "the Troubles."  Today, some argue that these walls are now barriers to the peace process as they continue defacto segregation.  Walls, as barriers to diffusion, stifle communication, cooperation and interaction.  Still, these walls are symbols of communal identity and icons in the cultural landscape.  For more academic work on this, see Peter Shirlow's Belfast: Segregation, Violence and the City.

 

Questions to Consider: How would a wall through an already culturally and politically divided city impact both sides of the wall?  Today, are the walls beneficial to peace in Northern Ireland?       

 

Tags: Ireland, states, borders, political. 


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

The walls in Belfast Ireland were put in the 60's to protect the residents and today many people argue they need to come down. My grandmother just returned from a trip to Ireland and Belfast was one of the areas they went. She said it was very sad, Christians had to walk on one side of the street and Protestans on the other in one area and the tour bus driver was being voice monitered by the police the whole time. There is so much seperation in Befast because of that wall and more people dont want it taken down then want it down for anything to be done. 

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:14 AM

The barrier in Belfast, Ireland is an impressive one. It has been there since the 1960s and having it there has become a security for the residence on both sides. Neither side wants it taken down, however, they have extremely different political/religious views. It seems strange to me that these people would prefer living in prison-like conditions just because that is the way it has been for so long. So long as the physical walls stay up, so will the cultural walls between these people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 5:13 AM

This article is about large walls which were constructed fifty years ago to separate a part Belfast, Northern Ireland to protect citizens from conflicts between loyalists and separatists. Q wall separating people could temporarily protect people from violent conflict, but it would undoubtedly ensure continued conflict and intensify the feeling of "Us vs. Them." Though the people interviewed from both sides of the wall in the article like the wall since it gives them a feeling of security, the wall is likely damaging to a peace process in Northern Ireland.

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Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests

Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
The proposed construction of an Islamic center near Ground Zero in New York caused outrage when it was announced two years ago. Now days after the 10-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the facility opened last night to no opposition.

 

This is an intriguing swing based on the initial reaction a few years ago about this Islamic cultural center.  Why the fervor 2 years ago?  Why the silence now?  These are worthwhile questions to explore with our students. 


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

In my opinion trying to stop the building of this was awful. American prides itself on being the land of the free and that includes freedom of religion regardless of what the horror that took place on 9/11. What was done on 9/11 can not be blamed on a whole population, race, or religion when it was the doing of one group. The rest of these innocent people who were are part of the United States of America were just as affected as the rest of us and it is good to see that this building was allowed to happen in peace.

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 3, 2013 8:02 PM

I wrote an essay two years ago, before Park51 opened, about the controversy surrounding it. Later, when I heard that it had finally opened, I was relieved. There were so many problems that the Islamic center faced because there was a lot of tension due to the center's proximity to Ground Zero. The Muslims need a place like this, especially close to Ground Zero to portray how it was terrorist groups that committed the terrible crimes and attacked the country and not the Islamic religion. In recent history, the US has had many problems with many Middle Eastern countries based on differences in beliefs, and the acceptance and tolerance of this cultural center portray how people can overcome these differences and not profile people based on religion, race, and ethnicity.

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How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico

How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited, an examination by The New York Times found.

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

Walmart bribed Mexico officals $52,000 to have the zoning maps redrawn before it was published in the newspapers. So when it was published it showed the allowed area drawen in for the building of the new walmart. The building created uproar from the people. They were upset from the congested traffic and created months of hunger strikes and sit ins that made Mexican media. 

 

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 9:36 AM

Some reactions that I had about this article were that the corporate Walmart took steps in order to enforce their way into the new making of a Walmart store in Mexico. Some things I would ask would be are what regualtions would the Mexican people know to follow in realation to the fact that Walmart had broken rules in order to expand their monopoly.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 6, 12:33 PM

Wal-Mart is sometimes considered to be the embodiment of globalization.  Unfortunately, these things  come at the cost of not only the quality of life of many people, but also at the cost of these people's culture itself.  This is especially sad in Teotihuacon, where the tourism that is brought by the ruins helps support locals small businesses (their livelihood).  As the article states, and which has been seen wherever a Wal-mart pops up, these small, local business get shut-out quickly.  According to the evidence, it seems as though most of Wal-Mart de Mexico's stores were established through bribery.  With such a huge corporation showing such sure signs of corruption, what else in Mexico is made possible through bribery?

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 1:58 PM

Walmart is a huge, huge, huge corporation. Does anyone really think they wouldn't bribe tons of Mexican cities to change their maps to put their stores into place? With Walmart's calculations of how well their stores would do in the Mexican societies, why not? Although Walmart's sly business is shameful and corruptive, is it so hard to believe they did this?

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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

This is so interesting! When you think about Mexico today we often think only about the drugs and wars and mass poverty that has consumed much of it. To think abou the true history of Meixco from the Aztecs that we are still unearthing today and learning from is amazing. Things like this helps us learn so much more about the past and tie things together. 

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 8:58 AM

This should remind us all that we're quite literally built on the sacrifices of our ancestors, no pun intended. Many of the ancient cities of the world lay right under the surface of their modern counterparts, and the secrets yet discovered which they contain is enough to spend lifetimes studying!

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 6, 7:42 AM

This article talks about not only the recent archeological find but the relevance of it.  Also included in this article are links to other relevant articles and a cool picture of the past superimposed over the modern day site.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 1:09 PM

It is not uncommon to find bones underneath rubble and construction sites. To find this amount of ancient bones and bodies underneath that whole place is quite absurd. Now that this has been exposed and people are aware of it, government has cleared the block and revealed the temple.