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Changing Ethnic patterns in London

Changing Ethnic patterns in London | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Of all the changes announced by the 2011 census, one of the most startling is the rapid change in the ethnic composition of London's population.

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

The most surprising piece of information in this article is that white Britons are leaving London because of the minorities that are moving in. As of 2013 only 59.9% of London was white, meaning that the miniorities are taking over Ethnic part of London much faster then first anticipated.   

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Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:25 AM
The British-white percentage of the population in London is dropping. While this says a lot about the demographics of London it also says a lot about global migratory patterns. London is a international city, culturally and ethnically, it has many pull factors for many different kinds of people from all over the globe, with all different cultural backgrounds. These pull factors have translated into one big push factor for British-whites, however, as they move out of the city.
There are many different things that could explain these patterns. Racism, economic shifts or better opportunities else where, however one thing is for sure, the world is become more multi-cultural. With the movements of cultures comes displacement and resistance, tension doesn’t run short in these types of situations. As so many people move away from their homelands through out the world it will be interesting to see what begins to happen with geopolitical boundaries, will situations like Hungary be more common as people move away?
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 5:43 PM

Since immigrants have flocked into London, it appears some of the White population has left the city because of it. The ethnic change is happening very quickly in London and White British population is no longer the majority. As large numbers of immigrants enter London, large numbers of White people leave the city. London is becoming a melting pot rather quickly. 

 
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:40 PM

If white flight is happening in Europe, where are all of its native migrating to? I know for years, there has been a large migrant population from the continent of Africa migrating to Europe, more specifically London, but where in the world could Britain's native be migrating to? Its common to hear of people migrating from rural areas to better neighborhoods, but with the influx of people looking for a better livelihood resemble that of the people living in countries such as India, China and Japan?

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Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.!

Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.! | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
An advertising campaign designed to illustrate the drawbacks of living in the U.K. is being planned to deter an expected surge of immigrants, according to reports

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

With the quota limiting the number of immigrants from bulgria and romania due to expire next year it will give 29 million people the right to not only enter but live and work in Britain. One plan is to force those arriving from Romiania and Bulgiaria to prove that they can support themselves for six months. They are also putting out an advertisment to try to show drawbacks to living in Britian to try and detur people from immigrating in.  

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 5:22 PM

It appears the U.K. is designing this campaign due to the fact they are struggling financially and they cannot afford to give benefits to some of the immigrants coming into the U.K., as immigrants are entering at a high rate.

When the Olympics games were hosted in London, the weather was beautiful and the sun was shining almost everyday, (which is rare in the U.K.) That made the U.K. even more attractive to foreigners and potential immigrants. This advertising campaign is displaying the drawbacks of living in the U.K., such as the rainy weather and constant grey skies.  

Flaviu Fesnic's curator insight, September 17, 2014 6:02 AM

UKIP launched an aggressive campaign against Romanians and Bulgarians by the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 which completely turned out to be a trick to gain some more votes.Not only this chauvinistic campaign showed a misleading message but it stirred an unjustified feeling of hatred toward Romanians&Bulgarians.Latest figures showed an influx of mostly high qualified persons , in fact !
Unlike the immmigration to Spain and Italy (1mill. to both of these countries) Romanians usually only work there and come back after a while,they don't settle there... It's probably, the Latin blood ! :)

Flaviu Fesnic's comment, September 17, 2014 6:14 AM
so, there was no influx but misleading UKIP politics... visit Cultural Geography on Facebook !
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What we can learn from Mexico

What we can learn from Mexico | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

Most of what we hear coming out of Mexico is from the drug trafficking, violence and murders but behind the scenes Mexico has been quietly developing. We can see here how georaphy is playing a big part in Mexico's development, because they share a boarder with the US they are able to transport products much cheaper over the boarder. One of the most interesting facts in this piece is that Mexico has trade agreements with 44 countries.     

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:18 PM

The facts about the "new" Mexico help in reasoning why less people are migrating.  The new Mexico looks hopeful and prosperous but when you read about the affects of the drug wars and violence, we see that there is still room for progress for the country in order to keep their citizens from leaving Mexico.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 5:17 PM

A few weeks ago, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics. That’s how you work toward the building of agreements. Unfortunately, it wasn't Barack Obama. It was Mexico’s Enrique Pena Nieto. One of the first things Pena Nieto did after assuming office was to announce a pact for Mexico, an ambitious set of reforms to raise taxes, increase competition and take on the teachers’ unions. While the world has gotten used to a torrent of images and news of drug-related violence from Mexico, another side of this country has been quietly developing. What we can learn from Mexico is that they are quite successful.  Mexico’s GDP is expected to grow by nearly 4 percent this year, twice as fast as Brazil or, for that matter, the United States. It is riding a manufacturing boom. Mexico is now the world’s fourth biggest producer of cars, according to the World Trade Atlas. Starting next year, new taxis in New York City will carry a “made in Mexico' label.” Mexico is also the world's top exporter of flat screen TVs. In fact, Mexico exports more manufactured products than all the other countries in Latin America combined. A major factor that comes into play is geography.  Sharing a border with the United States means heavy products are cheaper to transport across than if they were manufactured in, say, Asia. Nieto continues to inform us what we can learn from Mexico.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Unlike the United States, Mexico has a “spectrum” of political parties because of the proportional representation in their legislative branch. Under this type of system more than two political parties emerge as dominant and as such the candidates can run less on party line and more on what the candidate believes. Our system, the “winner take all system,” elicits a more polarized two party system.  The fact the Mexican government doesn’t have to deal with such staunch party lines (which have become ridiculously polarized over the past few years) is a huge reason for why the new leader can actually get things done and Obama can’t.  (Robert A. Daul, “How Democratic is the American Consituation?,” 103-118).

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z than so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

 

* Apparently the theory of Mexico's government may not be as simple as I though given our class discussion. Still the politics of Mexico is clearly different given how long the state was under a one party system. 

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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.

 

Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

There is a rising number of Indian origin born in the west that are moving back to India. One reason would be India's economy is growing faster then the US and England's. India has many more opportunities for new wealth and it is attracting the young entrepreneurs as well. Another reason they are moving back is for cultural connection that they are not recieving where they are now. Many have said that they are looked at as different and not accepted and that is why they want to go back to India, so that they feel that acceptance. 

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:43 PM

This article demonstrates the need to leave and create a better life for not only this family but for other families that feel as if their life and societial views are putting their future in jeapody. There is a rising number of people from India that are moving to the West; where their parents were born and restaring their lives there. They are in a sense coming home to what they had left behind.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:37 PM

As the article says, India is encouraging more people of Indian descent to return to India because of the opportunities that have become increasingly available within the country due to its  westernization . Aside from the corruption and poverty that are in India, the country has not seen any signs of these opportunities stopping.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:42 PM

With the rise in globalization and the IT industry, it is obvious that there is opportunity for success.  Many traveled to the US for economic opportunity, however many companies and IT departments are being outsourced to India, thus taking jobs away from the US.  

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

Because Belize was once a British colony english in the countries first language. That is quickly changing however with the immigaration of mexicans into Belize and Spanish is quickly taking over the lanuage. The country of Belize is no stranger to immigrants and they welcome them, even already seperating land in preperation. 

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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 3, 2:12 PM

Due to the colonial era Belize's national language is English. It's neat however to look upon how Spanish is becoming a firm language. It clearly shows that Belize is going through a culture change. Whats going on in Belize is equivalent to the Southwest. The southwest is English speaking, but it also has a high spanish speaking population and many individuals tend to learn spanish as well. In Belize, Spanish is  mandatory along side English, thus showing the important bilingual relationship. It seems to be accommodating for Spanish speaking citizens as well as citizens whom want to become bilingual.

The only issue is that jobs are far and few between due to the spanish speaking immigrant influx and there willingness to work for little pay. 

Another interesting factor, perhaps more on a global scale is how the service industry has changed due to the importance of being bilingual. In order to provide better services to ones country, one must be able to converse professionally in both languages to better accommodate and please the citizens. 

 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 9, 1:09 PM

The trend in Belize can be compared to and is similar to the dynamic going on in the United States.  Whereas, I don't foresee the English language taking as big of a hit as it is in Belize, there is still definitely an increase in presence of the Spanish language in most areas of our country.  In much the same way as Belize, America is also seeing many Mexicans and Central Americans immigrating to the states due to work and opportunity.  It is very interesting to see these two alike situations which are divided by many miles and multiple different Spanish-speaking countries but somehow have developed almost identical make-ups.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 6:05 PM

As an American, I've never really thought about immigration to places other than the U.S., but this really opened my eyes.  It's a bad situation.  These people need their jobs, and need the money, but the immigrants are scooping all of that up.  Immigration is such a large occurrence that the language spoken in Belize is actually changing.  It's gone so far that politicians are pitching in to help immigrants just to help themselves.  In a way, it's absurd, and shocking, at least to me, that the government is just welcoming this while the citizens seem to be so against it.

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Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean?

Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean? | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
With the highest unemployment rate in the U.S. and a mountain of debt, the island is facing a declining population. But those who stay insist they're there for the long haul.

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

The economic stuggles of the Puerto Rican population are driving many of them to head to the states. Puerto Rico currently has the highest unemployment rate in the US at 14 percent and endless debt. There are however those that are there to stay for the long haul. 

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 29, 2014 1:12 PM

It's interesting to see a place like Puerto Rico having these kinds of financial issues.  A place that has so much tourism should be able to capitalize on the fact that so many people come to visit and buy souvenirs and such.  As it was noted though, all this money is untaxed when it is sold from street vendors.  If the government could find a way to tax these goods then this could help.  It is scary to think about how much the economy of Puerto Rico affects our economy.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 10:18 PM

If this is the Greece of the Caribbean I wonder how long the US will hold on to PR?  I don't know many who want to hold onto a sinking ship.  I can remember when the unemployment rate in RI was about 13%.  That was scary and PR is up to 14%.  They need to find a way to manufacture or produce something they can sell instead of buying items to sell from the Mainland.  They need a self sustaining economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:52 AM

It's clear from the transcript and even more so from the comments that the root of economic woes in Puerto Rico is corruption. Corruption of the economy through the black market, kindly referred to as the "informal economy", pet projects such as the rail system that cost 2.2B dollars and serves only 12 miles, and the lack of education. Citizens of this island pseudo nation are leaving to pursue other opportunities not available to them in their native country. The US may want to infuse dollars into their economy to build a university and foster reading academies that teach young children to read. If they don't turn around the brain drain soon, this island paradise will not have a happy ending.Also, additional dollars could be allocated to the tourism industry to increase revenue for the island.

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

It is amazing that over 600 people come into Canada a day and settle into areas that used to be quite little farming land. These areas are now home to North Americas second largest Asian communities. Canada now has 260 ethnic enclave neighborhoods and they are an important part of Canadas landscape. They are mostly moving into the suburbs where land is cheaper and in my opinion I think they are moving there for job and because they concider it safer. They are also closing down the business of the families that have been their forever and cant compete like the greek families.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:41 AM

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

Gubert's curator insight, February 11, 5:17 AM

XIPHIAS Immigration is one among the Top Five Immigration Consultants in India according to The siliconindia as Top Five Most Promising Immigration Consultants. www.xiphiasimmigration,com

 

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

For 17 years she was known as nothing more than the Afgan girl today we now her name, Sharbat Gula. Sharbat is part of one of the most Afghan warlike tribes known as Pashtun. It is said that the Pashtun are only at peace when they are at war. She was just a child when the fighting began, and six when her parents were killed by a bombing. Her brother said they left Afghanistan because of the fighting and with their grandmother they walked for a week to Pakistan. Today she is married and takes care of her three daughters her brother says she has never known a happy day in her life. The girl known for 17 years as the Afghan girl has lied a lived of hard ship and tragedy.     

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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

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Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.

 

My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


Via Nathan Parrish, Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

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Nathan Parrish's comment, October 11, 2012 12:51 AM
Seth, I was shocked as well, but the credit goes to my students who have seemed to use some 3rd party website that automatically "views" another site from what they told me this morning. I emailed my class to start visiting my scoop.it site, which I have just created a few weeks ago and they felt the need to help boost my view count. I teach 1 class of APHG (some years up to 5) in the East Bay of Northern California and have been a lifelong geographer. The content I scoop is all me, through my various searches online. I came to scoop.it to begin to collaborate with other APHG teachers and share the content with my students. I feel a bit embarrassed that my site was discovered this way and hopefully the scoops I provide can make up for my student's bad sense of humor.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.