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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Bolivian and Peruvian farmers sell entire crop to meet rising western demand, sparking fears of malnutrition

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

Bolivia has become the first Latin American country to be McDonalds free since they closed their doors back in 2002. But what made them fall? It has been shown that Bolivians prefer their native food or to buy non traditional food from their own people selling them on the streets over the fast food. Its the reciprocity, they want to give back to each other as they can.  

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 27, 11:31 PM

Interesting to see that the Bolivian people did not want to have the large fast food chains in their country because they liked to stick with their traditional foods. The article says that the people of Bolivia still eat hamburgers, but they would prefer to buy them from people of their own country. This goes to show the hesitance of some countries to embrace other countries' ways, even if it is as unhealthy as McDonald's. Bolivia is at a geographic advantage because they have many organic vegetables and healthy foods, but large corporations like fast food chains are seeking to expand into them and other countries.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 31, 3:39 PM

This is amazing! It makes me happy that not everyone likes to jump on the corporate coat tails of a giant corporation like McDonalds. There has no nutritional value and cause nothing but health problems. Sticking to what they know and love, makes me happy to see. I wish America wasn't so fast food obsessed! Maybe then the American children wouldn't be so unheathly

Edelin Espino's curator insight, Today, 2:34 PM

McDonalds broke in Quinoa Bolivia. A somewhat interesting news because McDonalds is a fast food restaurant quite famous and to break is pretty rare. But Bolivians prefer hamburgers that the Chachitas do and they also prefer to eat their daily diet than fast food. This place called Quinoa in Bolivia is a really interesting place free of McDonald.

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The Changing Geography of Quinoa

The Changing Geography of Quinoa | Meagan's Geoography 400 | Scoop.it
Bolivian and Peruvian farmers sell entire crop to meet rising western demand, sparking fears of malnutrition

Via Seth Dixon
Meagan Harpin's insight:

The beautiful Quinoa plants grow and thrive in harsh conditions where nothing else can grow. Quinoa is one of the planets most nutritious food source that was once just a sacred crop for the Andean culture. It is now a health food for the middle class in the US and Europe, but the increased demand means less for the people of Bolivia and Peru and tripled prices. Many are concerned this could cause malnutrition because it is their main food source and it is now being taken from them at a rapid pace. Battles have even begun to be fought over prime Quinoa growing land. I love Quinoa, and its a big part of my diet but I never realized how important it was to the people of Bolivia and Peru or how much they relied on it.       

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 10:17 AM

I have never heard of Quinoa until I read this article.  I found myself amazed at the properties of this food especially when it is grown in such an inhospitable environment for growing other crops.  It is sad that the poor people eat less of it now but the income it generates for them is a good thing.  It allows them to increase their standards of living and entices people to return to their home villages rather than crowd into cities. With the increased income they can improve the variety of foods in their diets even if it means the decrease in consumption of the quinoa. 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 9:29 PM

Formally working in a whole food grocery store I have seen first hand the popularity of this starch. It is sad to think that because of the need for developed countries to "try" something new or "keep up" with what's popular ,a population is suffering. It makes me wonder is this not a crop that we could grow in the United States ?Not only to keep costs down but to relieve some stress on people such as the Peruvians.Can't we help these farmers who depend on this food as a staple in their diets?

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 8:48 PM

Bolivia and Peru once enjoyed Quinoa as a locally grown grain that was used in a nutritious diet. However, because  other parts of the world are becoming increasingly accustomed to Quinoa it is driving the price of the grain in both countries, which is putting the locals in a tough pot because it is practically tripling in price. The poorer citizens are struggling to get Quinoa, something that they once got relatively easy.