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The 3-way partnership that is transforming Digital Pharma #hcsmeufr #esante

From www.youtube.com

Pharma enterprises have a uniquely complex set of challenges when it comes to launching products in the digital space. As their digital partner, customer
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Understanding the Consumer Journey in Pharma Marketing Today-Bryan Cohen, Digital Platform Lead, Promotional Operations, Pfizer

From www.slideshare.net

Ahead of the marcus evans PharmaMarketing Summit 2017, Bryan Cohen discusses why pharma marketers need to view the journey through the consumer’s eyes
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JIM.fr - Promotion des médicaments : la HAS renforce les règles

From www.jim.fr

Paris, le jeudi 6 avril 2017 - Depuis décembre 2004, la promotion de médicaments auprès des professionnels de santé déployée par les laboratoires pharmaceutiques, autrement appelée « visite médicale », doit être certifiée conformément à un référentiel de la Haute autorité de santé (HAS). Cette charte de qualité signée entre les pouvoirs publics et les industriels définit notamment les principes à respecter en termes d'information délivrée aux professionnels de santé, de déontologie [...]
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Sanofi gets FDA clearance for insulin dose calculator app

From www.mobihealthnews.com

Following in the footsteps of Eli Lilly and Roche, Sanofi has quietly received FDA clearance for a smartphone app with a built-in insulin dose calculator. According to FDA documents, the app, cleared at the end of March, is called My Dose Coach.
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Pharma Video Just Got Huge

From notesfromarepsjournal.com

For what feels like a long time now, I have been talking with photographers about the value clients are placing on video.  I have been encouraging photographers to find a solution for motion that works for them, whether it be a DP or they themselves holding the camera.  Either way, the writing has been on…
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Six Success Imperatives For Building A World-Class Digital Factory In Pharma

From dt-associates.com

Digital factories—central, shared organizations that coordinate and deliver digital platforms and related services for the wider company—are here to stay. But are large pharmaceutical firms getting the most out of them? And how do you set the team up for success? Digital executives at global pharmaceutical firms need to calibrate six success factors to achieve the promised benefits of digital factories: a competitive time to market, reduced cost, and world-class digital capability.
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Is It Time For Pharma To Give Up The Social Media Ghost?

From www.doseofdigital.com

Social media has been a big focus for pharma marketers for a while now. By my count, at least 30-45% of ePharma’s agenda from the 2014 NY conference was focused on the subject, and there is a whole cottage industry of other conferences specifically for social media fin the pharma industry. If you spend any time following pharma folks on Twitter, you can find tons of tweets on the subject and create whole feeds for hashtags like #socpharm, #hcsm, #pharmsm, etc.

I say it’s time to move on.

You read correctly. Before some of you go indiscriminately crazy and lambaste me in the comments for the mere suggestions that social isn’t important, let me offer some points of clarification. As it relates to corporate communications, I think using social media is a no brainer. For J&J, Pfizer, AZ, et. al., using social channels effectively is essential for reputation management, stockholder news, crisis management, etc. It’s the cost of doing business in the digital world we live in. Additionally, using social platforms to seed content is just fine, as long as you’re not expecting huge results. I’m a firm believer in a distributed content strategy, but 99% of the time, pharm brands place content in social platforms with the comments sections (or anything else even remotely ‘social’) disabled.

I believe the whole use of the medium needs to be seriously rethought. Simply put, there are serious challenges for using (and I mean really using) social media for a pharma brand. For instance:

Fostering dialogue and conversations isn’t the business that pharma brands are inThe marketing teams assigned to those brands aren’t built to sustain the kinds of relationships necessary to succeedPR and marketing rarely coordinate within a given brandThe regulatory organizations (FDA or otherwise) will only let you discuss what’s exactly in the product’s label, andUsers, by all indications, aren’t interested in pharma infringing on their timelines and feeds

Defining social media
The term “social media” has been hijacked by the pharma industry, and thus, needs to be properly re-defined in order to better comprehend my argument. Social media, as defined by Wikipedia, is “…interaction among people in which they create, share, and/or exchange information and ideas in virtual communities and networks.” If you read this carefully, you begin to understand my point. Pharma does almost none of these things. While the creation of content is part and parcel to the pharma marketing regimen, I would argue that the minute your regulatory team requires you shut off sharing or comments features, the social media aspects of your programs cease to exist. If social media is about the collaboration of ideas and the sharing of communication, is it really a social program any more if the direction of those communications is entirely one-way?

Hey hey, ho ho. The FDA is slow slow slow
In 2009 the FDA held hearings to gather input from industry about what it should consider when eventually releasing guidance on social media marketing. From that moment, I’ve heard the FDA being used as a prop for why brands couldn’t or shouldn’t engage in social channels. The reasoning was that brands wanted to clearly understand what the guidance would be, or the fear of launching something that would eventually be deemed non-compliant thereby incurring a warning letter. I think those and the myriad of other excuses assigned to the FDA were false-flags hiding a deeper issue. If the business case for social utilization were solid, and most would have you believe that it is, then clarification from FDA should open the flood gates for social media programs. But social media just isn’t really understood by brand marketers, and more importantly, the more one examines the business case for it, the less sense it actually makes for pharma products.

Don’t believe me? I can prove it.

The second week of January 2014, the FDA released draft “Guidance for Industry Fulfilling Regulatory Requirements for Postmarketing Submissions of Interactive Promotional Media for Prescription Human and Animal Drugs and Biologics.” Despite being woefully behind schedule in releasing the full social media guidance it promised, this was at least something from the FDA that clarified its position in some small part. Most notable of the guidance was that FDA finally provided clarity about one of the aspects of social media that the industry has been clamoring for the most: working with bloggers and content creators to disseminate branded information.

You would think, given that it’s been more than 90 days later, we’d have seen movement towards these kinds of programs. After all, we were told guidance, any guidance, was necessary so brands could finally move forward with social media without running afoul of the FDA. As of this posting, there has been nothing even remotely “social” being done. As part of running the Social Media Wiki, I have a number of bots and alerts to let me know when a whole host of pharma products get discussed online. I may be slow to output updates to the wiki, but the data coming in is timely. It is possible that I missed something, but I doubt it.

It’s time we had “the talk”
I hate to break the news, but social communications is not the business that pharma is in. If every reply, response, or retweet has to take 24 hours (or more) to run through a legal team before going live, I think we’ve gone well beyond any reasonable concept of conversation or dialogue. I think it’s also reasonable to assume if a patient has a question about a pharma product they don’t want to wait 24-72 hours for a response. But even if the lag time were lesser, would it even matter?

When you actually ask patients if they find pharma’s participation in social to be effective, the answer is a resounding “no.” According to a Deloitte study in 2012, despite almost 65% of respondents saying that they use the internet for health information, only 5% said that social networking sites from pharma were trustworthy and credible. 5%. Even if pharma were able to engage in anything close to real time, patients just simply won’t believe the information being provided. Perhaps even more damaging, according to Manhattan Research (ePharma consumer 2013) when asked how they’d like to engage with a pharma brand, only 10% indicated they’d watch a YouTube video and 11% said they’d ‘Like’ a Facebook page. (Other channels, like Twitter ranked even lower) Given those abysmal numbers, should pharma even bother?

Not every brand can grow up to be Zappos. That’s ok. There are plenty of non-pharma resources out there for patients that provide beneficial real-time interactions. In all likelihood, patients will get the info they need from message boards, online resources from their insurance provider, or increasingly, their physician via email or text. The real-time interactions that would benefit patients are more closely aligned with the roles played by the physician, pharmacists or insurance providers are playing online. Those industries are getting better and better at using social channels to help patients while pharma falls further and further behind. So instead, perhaps it’s time to more properly focus on what maximizing the value that pharma CAN provide.

Software As A Service: The Real “Pill +”
At its essence, pharma provides medicines that patients utilize to combat illness. The business is one of product development, engineering, distribution, and use. I don’t care what pill, injectable, brand, or biologic you’re marketing, your #1 problem is usually compliance. Almost every pharma product except Viagra or contraception has a compliance drop off curve that plummets somewhere around the 90 day mark. (There are of course variances, but this is pretty typical). According to a report by Harris Interactive, roughly half of all prescriptions for drugs to be taken on an ongoing basis are either not completed or are never filled in the first place.

The information on how to take a medication is widely available. Patients receive a package insert with their medication detailing the information about what they’ve been prescribed and how to take it. Their doctor probably spent some time walking them through what they need to know as well. For its part, pharma has been very successful educating patients about these topics. Say what you will about the brand.com for pharma (and I have), they still do the yeoman’s work of providing information to patients, detailing information about what a product does, how to take it, and what side effects it may cause. If a patient does have a question about a product, chances are the information, (or rather, the information pharma is allowed to share), is detailed rather well on its website.

So if compliance is the problem, software services (like mobile tools) not social media, are the most likely solutions. Compared to the abysmal numbers for social media, according to Kantar Health study, 90% of patients would like an app or online service to help them manage their condition or track taking their medications, provided it was recommended by their physician. Pharma is very good at developing and distributing the molecules and biologics to help patients, but has an enormous opportunity to develop technologies and services in a parallel path that assist the patient when taking their medicine. At its core, the pharma industry is rooted in science and technology, developing the software and services to accentuate a product isn’t that far outside of it’s cultural wheelhouse.

Perhaps, given the desire by patients for services, not social conversations, pharma should refocus its efforts on creating the technologies and tools that give patients what they need to manage their conditions, and leave the chatting to someone else.

In my next post, I’ll take a look at the most promising areas for pharma to focus it’s efforts in software and services. In the mean time, drop me a comment and tell me what you think.

- See more at: http://www.doseofdigital.com/2014/03/time-pharma-give-social-media-ghost/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+DoseOfDigital+(Dose+of+Digital+-+Improving+Healthcare+Through+Digital+Technology)#sthash.6h1y1D3A.dpuf

 

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E-santé : Une oasis au milieu des déserts ! #esante #hcsmeufr @gdedurat @univdeserts

From pharmageek.fr

Interview avec Guillaume de Durat sur les Universités d'été des déserts numériques et médicaux - la e-santé ne pourra se faire sans traiter ces questions
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Innovation index Pharma

From www.ideapharma.com

IDEA Pharma specialises in path-to-market strategy at phase II, transforming the probability of commercial success for any molecule.
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Le top 25 des CDO français : qui sont-ils et que font-ils ? -  congrats @vincentmontet

From www.brandwatch.com

Quelle que soit l’opinion que l’on a sur le sujet, la transformation numérique est bel et bien là. Chaque entreprise est impactée différemment, mais toutes sont concernées. Afin de survivre et de réussir le tournant dans ce nouvel environnement, chaque organisation doit repenser … Suite
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Après Novartis et Sanofi, Verily Life Science (Google) se rapproche de GSK

From www.usine-digitale.fr


La maison mère de Google continue de se placer dans la pharma.

Son entité dédiée, Verily Life Science, a signé un troisième partenariat avec un géant du secteur : le britannique GSK.
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NTIC : Comment promouvoir leur usage chez les médecins et les professionnels de santé 

From www.santelog.com

Recueillir, stocker, traiter et partager l'information et notamment les données « patients » par voie électronique fait partie des enjeux et des défis prioritaires à relever dans nos systèmes de santé.

FELIX's curator insight, March 27, 4:08 PM
Les NTIC ont le potentiel d'améliorer les soins de santé et la santé des patients, c’est ce qu’il faut retenir sur la nécessité de convaincre les professionnels de santé à mieux choisir leurs outils et à es utiliser.

Les médecins attendent beaucoup des technologies 

From www.itnumeric.com

Le géant japonais de l’électronique Epson vient de sonder sept mille ‘’professionnels de la santé’’ en Europe.
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What kind of digital health tools will improve patient engagement?

From medcitynews.com

When you’re sick or require medical attention, you need to be focused. But emotions and physical limitations can impede the ability of a patient or their family to understand and retain important details, such as instructions for surgical prep or aftercare, which can have a significant impact on a patient’s health outcomes. In fact, an estimated 50 percent of patients don’t experience optimal clinical outcomes because they don’t correctly follow their physician’s instructions.
Aristide Adjinacou's curator insight, March 16, 3:17 AM
Patient engagement is 50% of the treatment so let 's  do what needs to be done in that area

Le laboratoire pharmaceutique Janssen lance son fonds de dotation #hcsmeufr

From www.carenews.com

Le groupe pharmaceutique Janssen crée son fonds de dotation. Des appels à projets seront bientôt lancés pour récompenser les initiatives qui contribuent à…
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Digital Health Tech Takes Off in Clinical Trials and Pharmaceuticals

From insights.samsung.com

Digital Health in Clinical Trials

In a new survey on how digital health devices and data impact clinical trials, digital health technology vendor Validic reported:

Sixty percent of respondents said they have used digital health technology to conduct clinical trials.
Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they will increase their use of digital technologies in clinical trials in the next five years.
Mobile apps and in-home clinical-grade devices are currently the most commonly used devices in clinical drug trials, but wearable activity trackers and sensors will be the focus of future use.
Seventy percent of respondents said patient-generated health data (PGHD) could have the greatest impact on improving treatments for chronically ill populations.
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Getting Social in the Real World | Thought leadership and innovation for the Pharmaceutical Industry - EyeforPharma

From social.eyeforpharma.com

Although it would be facetious to say that social media has reached a tipping point into ubiquity, it is only relatively recently that it has been used by pharma to collect and analyze patient data. This use of social media may only be in its infancy but as a quick and inexpensive way to gather large-scale, real-world data it is growing rapidly.
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Direct-to-Consumer #Pharma Drug Ad Spending at an All-Time High

From www.mmm-online.com

Spending on direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical ads rose 9% to $5.6 billion in 2016 [see note below], in part fueled by a 16% boost in spending from Bristol-Myers Squibb, according to data from Nielsen.

Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb again took the two top spots among drugmakers, spending $1.1 billion and $458 million, respectively, on DTC ads. AbbVie, Eli Lilly, and Allergan rounded out the top five DTC spenders. The Nielsen figures include business to business, outdoor, cinema, television, magazine, newspaper, and radio media spend, but not digital.

Newer brands to the top 20 list in 2016 include Novartis' heart-failure drug Entresto ($122 million), Novo Nordisk's diabetes treatment Victoza ($128 million), Celgene's psoriasis drug Otezla ($96 million), and Eli Lilly's diabetes drug Trulicity ($184 million).

The Celgene ad is under scrutiny by regulators. The drugmaker received an untitled letter from the FDA's Office of Prescription Drug Promotion last year over its DTC ad for Otezla, which said the ad's use of loud music and attention-grabbing visuals downplayed the risk information presented therein (here).

When broken down by channel, pharma companies spent less on cinema, newspaper, and radio media last year but sharply increased their investment in outdoor media by 552%. Business to business, television, and magazine media spend also grew, by 31%, 11%, and 6%, respectively.

Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 6, 10:33 AM

Note: The 2016 data comes from Neilsen. The data in my chart for 2014 and 2015 comes from Kantar Media, which generally reports slightly higher numbers. In 2015, for example, Kantar estimated the DTC spend to be $5.4 billion whereas Neilsen estimated it to be around $5.2. Whatever the source, it is clear that DTC ad spending is at an all-time high. I included data from AARP regarding its estimate of % price increase for drugs used by older Americans.

Sanofi lance des essais cliniques "numériques" à distance

From www.leparisien.fr

Le groupe pharmaceutique français Sanofi a annoncé jeudi le lancement d'essais cliniques "numériques" permettant en particulier de suivre les participants à distance, en partenariat avec la société californienne Science 37.
Cette initiative vise à décentraliser et dématérialiser, grâce au numérique, la conduite (des) essais cliniques. La nouvelle méthode s'appuiera sur les technologies mobiles et la télémédecine.

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Can patient portals bridge the digital divide?

From insight.athenahealth.com

Patient portals are an easy way for patients and physicians to stay in touch in between visits. That's why they are a key tool for building patient loyalty, reducing staff workloads, and increasing revenues and patient engagement.
They could also be an aid for managing population health — but only if patients in need of services actually use their portal accounts.
Across cities and towns, that's beginning to happen. Of 4.8 million urban patients on the athenahealth network who had doctors' visits between January and August 2016, 33 percent were registered on their physicians' portals.
But outside of urban areas, it's a different story: Just 18 percent of rural patients across the network use a portal.
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Takeda Tests Apple Watch App for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

From www.pmlive.com

Working with UK firm Cambridge Cognition the company is piloting the app to monitor and assess cognitive function in patients with MDD, which affects around 350 million around the world.

 

Nicole Mowad-Nassar, vice president of external partnerships at Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA, said: “This collaboration is part of our strategy to embrace new technology to better understand the patient experience and assist healthcare professionals in creating improved patient care pathways.”

 

The small 30-patient trials of adults who have been prescribed an antidepressant will evaluate the app's feasibility and compliance, and aims to understand how a wearable's measures of mood and cognition compare to traditional neuropsychological testing and patient reported assessments.

Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 2, 1:44 PM

Further Reading:

2016 was record year for generics, Top 10 drugs going off-patent in 2017, Soon, no more ED ads!

From www.linkedin.com

Welcome to the February 28, 2017, edition of Pharma Industry News Update (aka PinUp), which is published every Tuesday and Friday as part of the Pharma Marketing News subscription service. PinUp presents selected content of topical interest from a variety of sources. View the Web version of this issue here: http://bit.ly/PINUP022817  

 

Articles in this issue:

 

Further Reading:

 

About Pharma Industry News Update

The Pharma Industry News Update (aka PinUp) is published every Tuesday and Friday as part of the Pharma Marketing News subscription service. It features curated pharma industry news and views of topical interest from a variety of sources. If you'd like to receive this newsletter, subscribe here.

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