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Want More Quality Clinical Trial Recruits? Fix Your Website

From www.healthworkscollective.com

When it comes to finding clinical trial candidates online, getting your message in front of the right people is half the battle — which means your website must be designed with its audience in mind. At the end of the day, potential participants won’t spend any time on your page if they don’t like what they see.

Healthcare marketers are engaging in an increasingly competitive fight to attract the most qualified clinical trial recruits. Unsurprisingly, e-recruitment has emerged as an incredibly effective channel for gaining a leg up, especially as over half of all consumers now turn to the internet as their first source for health-related information. And the most engaged segment of this audience tends to be people in poor health who are seeking immediate treatment, according to Deloitte.

As part of this growing trend, an average of 20% of clinical research candidates are now found via e-recruitment, according to a Cutting Edge white paper. Still, the recruitment process tends to consume nearly a third of every clinical trial’s lifespan, causing over 33% of all trials to stretch on much longer than expected — a huge problem when delays can cost pharmaceutical companies anywhere from $600,000 to $8 million a day.

Digital strategies like paid search and SEO have helped CROs and clinical trial coordinators reach ever-broadening candidate pools, but many overlook an essential piece of the conversion puzzle: the trial’s primary website.

Where Many Sites Fall Short

A website is often a candidate’s first impression of the proposed trial, the proverbial “top of the funnel” — and we all know first impressions matter. Unfortunately, according to the same Cutting Edge research, trial websites tend to present noticeable UX issues for first-time visitors, and their initial frustrations often turn into a loss of trust in the entire program.

Many trial sites are poorly designed, since the main work of the project obviously takes place in the clinical stage. These sites can be confusing and difficult to navigate, and often aren’t optimized for mobile browsers — a huge oversight, considering 52% of smartphone owners have used their device to search online for health information, according to Pew Internet.

Thanks to these issues with often-hastily constructed sites, many potentially suitable recruits are left unsure of whether or not they even qualify for the trial.

What’s worse, a poorly designed site can completely undermine the trial’s credibility. Visitors might fear that their personal information and medical history won’t stay personal for long — a huge blow for recruiters, since that data is the entire basis on which clinical trials select their participants. On the other hand, who can blame them? It stands to reason that, “If I can’t understand what they’re asking for and the site is second-rate, how can I trust they’ll be any more competent handling my information?”

Build Trust and Enhance Experience Through Surveys

Candidates should be guided to the information they need as soon as they reach the site — this means that everything from titles to trial descriptions to medical definitions to contact information should be clear, concise, and easily accessible. Picture your least tech-savvy relative, and ask yourself if they could painlessly navigate your site. And think about FAQs first: what do your trial candidates need to know?

Surveys and quizzes should be immediately accessible, both to screen for eligible candidates and to grow your candidate pool for future trials (not to mention demonstrate that you won’t waste your participants’ time). Remember, as with any type of clinical recruitment, quality is more important than quantity, so make a point of ensuring that candidates feel that their efforts are valued.

Some sites even use candidates’ demographic information to outline the clinical journey for them in text or video. Multimedia is increasingly an expectation for consumers on the web, and a short, informative video can dramatically improve the candidate experience and bolster conversion rates.

Also, remember to always track every visitor, regardless of their qualifications — many of them might not be a fit for your current trial, but that doesn’t mean they won’t be for the next one. To this end, remarketing strategies allow CROs and trial coordinators to target people who have visited their sites, qualify them based on demographics and online user habits, and serve them paid advertisements.

For clinical trial recruiters, these efforts are more than worthwhile. According to Datamonitor (via Cutting Edge), e-recruitment for clinical trials costs an average of 75% less per participant than traditional marketing channels. If marketers learn to focus on the candidate journey and improve their online presence with a high-quality website, those successes will only be multiplied.


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Takeda Joins #Pharma Digital Accelerator Club

From www.pharmexec.com

Global pharma company Takeda is another example of a leading company that is pursuing new applications of digital technology to develop solutions to the challenges facing healthcare, both here in Japan and around the world.
 
Takeda and its “Start-Up Incubator”
With more than 30,000 employees, a presence in 70 countries and products across a wide range of therapeutic areas, Takeda is constantly looking for new ways to bring new value to patients as part of its patient-centric culture. One of these ways is its approach to digital strategy and technology.
 
Takeda has embedded digital strategy into its DNA with a model it calls the "Takeda Digital Accelerator”," designed to provide investment to new ideas that apply key customer digital trends to the healthcare space, with the goal of generating patient-centric innovations that can drive stronger outcomes. Its foundation is in digital experimentation, where new ways of thinking and working are discovered by testing and learning.
 
First, Takeda assembles the teams and resources needed for this experimentation to take place. Then, different teams work on small, local challenges, which they test using specific hypothesis. These findings are then incubated and shared acros the Takeda community, where other teams can leverage them.
 
Another way this Digital Accelerator model works is through the global ecosystem of external partners Takeda has built over the years. These partners are also helpe make recommendations and solutions to healthcare challenges, and the findings are incubated, tested and shared across the larger network.
 
This kind of forward thinking helps Takeda identify, explore and experiment with new ways of digitizing the healthcare experience in ways that ultimately benefit patients.
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek:

My friend Craig DeLarge (@cadelarge), Head of Digital Acceleration, Emerging Markets at Takeda, must be involved in this. I invite him to be a guest on my podcast show!

Sandra Boyer's curator insight, March 12, 2016 5:41 PM

My friend Craig DeLarge (@cadelarge), Head of Digital Acceleration, Emerging Markets at Takeda, must be involved in this. I invite him to be a guest on my podcast show!

Helen Adams's curator insight, March 14, 2016 5:58 AM

My friend Craig DeLarge (@cadelarge), Head of Digital Acceleration, Emerging Markets at Takeda, must be involved in this. I invite him to be a guest on my podcast show!

Melanie COVINHES's curator insight, March 14, 2016 6:22 AM

My friend Craig DeLarge (@cadelarge), Head of Digital Acceleration, Emerging Markets at Takeda, must be involved in this. I invite him to be a guest on my podcast show!

Oser l’auto-disruption

From www.lesechos.fr

La disruption des modèles traditionnels, vision clé de la transformation digitale & opportunité de collaboration...
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Is Digital Health Improving the Patient Experience? | Centric Digital

From centricdigital.com

If 2015 healthcare investment levels are any indication, investors the world over are focusing on patient experience above all other digital health investment subsectors.
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek:
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
 
eMedToday's curator insight, March 3, 2016 2:57 AM
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
 
jean-francois delas's curator insight, March 3, 2016 12:44 PM
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
 
Centric Digital's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:12 PM
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 

 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 

 
 

Will pharma ever “get” emarketing?

From worldofdtcmarketing.com

KEY TAKEAWAY: CPG companies have been investing heavily in building digital capabilities because they understand that traditional interruption marketing is not as effective as before.
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Pharma - DIgital : To go or not to go ? #digitalpharma

From pharmageek.fr

Conférence « L’industrie Pharma Digitale et Connectée » , Tout savoir du digital pour mettre en oeuvre vos stratégies Beyond the pill en 2016 #Digitalpharma
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LEO PHARMA EN MODE STARTUP POUR AIDER LES PATIENTS ATTEINTS DE PSORIASIS

From pharmageek.fr

LEO PHARMA EN MODE STARTUP POUR AIDER LES PATIENTS ATTEINTS DE PSORIASIS
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek:

Un laboratoire qui crée son Innovation Lab au service des patients atteints de psoriasis....et qui cherche des startups de l'ecosystème esanté pour inventer et devélopper des solutions.

A suivre

SOBAS's curator insight, March 2, 2016 10:24 AM

Un laboratoire qui crée son Innovation Lab au service des patients atteints de psoriasis....et qui cherche des startups de l'ecosystème esanté pour inventer et devélopper des solutions.

A suivre

WellDoc collaborates with Johnson & Johnson's LifeScan on mobile tech for diabetes

From www.healthcareitnews.com

LAS VEGAS – WellDoc, a mobile health technology vendor, announced Tuesday at HIMSS16 a collaboration with LifeScan, a blood glucose monitoring business within the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Care Companies, to deliver a digital health...
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Drug Industry Launches Ad Campaign Aimed at Lawmakers

From www.wsj.com

The pharmaceutical industry is ramping up an advertising campaign designed to improve its reputation with lawmakers, as it lobbies against any effort to rein in prescription costs.
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PhRMA Hopes to Sway Lawmakers, Not Consumers, Via Its "Hope" Campaign

From econsultancy.com

Pharma companies are not doing a great job at reaching physicians through social, and their ability to advertise to consumers could be eliminated in the US if the American Medical Association (AMA) has its way.

 

But the pharmaceutical industry's largest trade group, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), isn't targeting physicians or consumers in what could be its most important ad campaign.

 

As detailed by the Wall Street Journal, as part of PhRMA's multi-million dollar spend this year, the organization will be relying heavily on social channels like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for the digital portion of the campaign.

 

The goal: counter ongoing public outrage over drug prices with the pharma industry's perspective in an effort to avoid or limit action that could harm pharma companies.

 

The most interesting aspect of PhRMA's digital campaign is that it won't be attempting to win the hearts and minds of the general population.

 

That is an impossible undertaking, as PhRMA board member and Celgene Corp CEO Robert Hugin told attendees at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco in January.

Instead, PhRMA plans to use the targeting tools offered by social channels to target its digital ads specifically to influential individuals, namely politicians and analysts who impact healthcare policy.

 

Those targeting tools are increasingly powerful. For example, on Facebook, advertisers can target their ads to users in specific locations, like Washington DC.

 

Combined with Facebook's ability to target using demographics, interests and behaviors, and it's likely that an organization like PhRMA could have quite a bit of success reaching a relatively small group of influencers with just a handful of thoughtful filters.

Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek:

This is an interesting analysis considering that PhRMA's new CEO is a Washington insider/lobbyist. For more on that, read "Former #Pharma Pfizer R&D Exec Gives Some Advice to PhRMA's New CEO"; http://sco.lt/6vhq2j  

Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 1, 2016 7:26 AM

This is an interesting analysis considering that PhRMA's new CEO is a Washington insider/lobbyist. For more on that, read "Former #Pharma Pfizer R&D Exec Gives Some Advice to PhRMA's New CEO"; http://sco.lt/6vhq2j  

eMedToday's curator insight, March 1, 2016 10:34 PM

This is an interesting analysis considering that PhRMA's new CEO is a Washington insider/lobbyist. For more on that, read "Former #Pharma Pfizer R&D Exec Gives Some Advice to PhRMA's New CEO"; http://sco.lt/6vhq2j  

Dominique Godefroy's curator insight, March 3, 2016 5:12 AM

This is an interesting analysis considering that PhRMA's new CEO is a Washington insider/lobbyist. For more on that, read "Former #Pharma Pfizer R&D Exec Gives Some Advice to PhRMA's New CEO"; http://sco.lt/6vhq2j  

Report: Personalized Medicine Is Having A Positive Measurable Effect on Patient Outcomes

From hitconsultant.net

A new approach to research, pharmaceutical development, and clinical care is remaking healthcare. Known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, it p
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Les géants pharmaceutiques absents du Top 10 des labos les plus innovants

From www.latribune.fr

Les cinq plus gros laboratoires pharmaceutiques en termes de chiffre d'affair...
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JIM.fr - Des freins français à l’accès au marché des dispositifs médicaux innovants

From www.jim.fr

JIM.fr - Des freins français à l’accès au marché des dispositifs médicaux innovants : https://t.co/ok4xYV5ulR...
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Most Americans Eager to Use Digital Health Tools

From www.mhealthtalk.com

Market research from the Makovsky Health survey shows that most Americans Eager to Use Digital Health Tools and includes an infographic.
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Fifth Annual "Pulse of Online Health" Survey Finds 66% of Americans Eager To Leverage Digital Tools To Manage Personal Health

From www.prnewswire.com

NEW YORK, Feb. 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Fifth Annual 'Pulse of Online Health' Survey Finds 66% of Americans Eager To Leverage Digital Tools To Manage...
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"Nous ne sommes pas dans une logique d'acquisition de startups" (Litman, Sanofi)

From www.latribune.fr

Au début du mois de février, le géant pharmaceutique français a rejoint l'ass...
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Denmark's oldest healthcare company opens innovation lab in Markham, its first outside Europe

From betakit.com

LEO Pharma, Denmark's oldest healthcare company, announced that it is opening its first innovation lab in North America dedicated to finding solutions for
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ePharma Summit 2016

From www.iirusa.com

IIR USA Events events provide you with laser focused content, unique experiences, access to people & ideas that create innovation, relevant connections, & generate business.
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Patient engagement strategies in a digital environment: Life sciences companies respond to changing patient expectations

From dupress.com

In a shifting health care landscape, nontraditional players are trying to frame patient engagement strategies that are focused on providing patients solutions that are coordinated, convenient, customized, and accessible.
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Sanofi: Bruxelles autorise l’alliance avec Google dans le diabète #hcsmeufr #pharma

From www.mypharma-editions.com

La Commission européenne a autorisé mercredi, en vertu du règlement sur les concentrations de l'Union Européenne, la création d'une joint-venture dans le diabète entre Aventis, filiale du groupe pharmaceutique français Sanofi et de Verily Life Sciences, filiale de Alphabet, la société holding de l’américain Google.
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Deadpool Imparts a Lesson to Pharma Marketers

From www.mmm-online.com

Do you know about “Deadpool?” Neither did I. Then, I realized. The “Deadpool” story is every pharma brand.

Now that we're on the same page, here's the marketing part.

Twentieth Century Fox went social to promote the film. ComScore's PreAct found pre-release chatter about “Deadpool” was the second-best ever among Marvel Studios adaptations and that the Internet conversation was 98% positive. BoxOffice Media predicted the opening weekend would rival that of bigger releases such as “Ant-Man” and “The Amazing Spider-Man”—and was proven clairvoyant when the flick earned $132.7 million, the biggest first weekend gross in history for an R-rated movie.

Most essential for pharma marketers, “Deadpool” offers a blueprint for brands seeking to activate their own base on social media and broaden their message reach with credibility. 

Be Authentic

Actor Ryan Reynolds plays the title character. He's also the movie's producer. Many of the posts come from him. It's authentic.

Think of Reynolds as a KOL. He is vested in the science, knows the backstory, believes in the product's potential, and wants to see it win. KOLs make your story their story. They are authentic and powerful—especially in social media.

Embrace All Constituents

Reynolds took to Instagram last May. Yes, he talks about the movie, but he also features pictures of himself with diehard fans, including kids from the Make-a-Wish Foundation.

The lesson here? Your story is more than science. On social media, embrace patient advocates and all organizations around your community. KOLs, patients, and associations dominate social engagement among healthcare professionals.

Get Viral

Fox, the studio behind “Deadpool,” jumped into social big. It identified the character's most rabid social audience and gave them images, stories, and videos they could leverage.

By feeding content to the movie's social fans, they activated the brand's most vocal advocates. The core audience contributed more than 700 articles to Moviepilot, a site that helps “studios trigger, fuel, and amplify positive conversations about their movies.”

Break your story into pieces that your community can repurpose so that it echoes in all channels. In old-school terms, think review articles. In social terms, think retweeting charts or creating approved branded assets that you can personalize in email campaigns.

The social market for HCPs is much bigger than you think

More than half of gastroenterologists use social media to connect, collaborate, and learn. One out of two oncologists and rheumatologists do, too. As do more than a quarter of cardiologists and about one in four hematologists—and the list goes on.

More impressive is the growth. The community around the 2015 American Society of Hematology's meeting created more than 103 million impressions on Twitter. That's up seven times from 15 million impressions in 2013. The size of the community and its activity each also grew at better than a 100% compound annual growth rate since 2013.

Competition can be fierce

Like Fox, some companies jumped on social early and in a big way. Roche, Bayer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Amgen, and Novartis each hit the top 10 in share of social voice at least one day during ASH in December. Our analysis went further and found that AbbVie, BMS, Amgen, Celgene, and Takeda hit the top five for engagement on social media during ASH.

Still, there's room for new entrants. Each community is different. Some are big. Some have competition. A few have both. Eight companies hit the top 10 for share of social voice at least one day to compete for oncologists and the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 277 million impressions at its annual meeting.

Ten companies competed hard for rheumatologists at the American College of Radiology's meeting and their 30 million impressions. On the other hand, only two companies—AstraZeneca and Merck—placed at the American College of Cardiology's conference. No brands peaked at the American Psychiatric Association or the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' annual meetings.

Social is a big deal in healthcare. Marketers can use it to create positive chatter and win greater awareness, recognition, and credibility among target audiences. Pick your community. Be authentic. Go broad. Get viral.


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Say 'Yes' to Drugs? The History of Pharmaceutical Marketing

From blog.hubspot.com

Mom, I know you might have freaked out a bit when you read that headline. But don't worry! The whole "Say 'Yes' to Drugs" bit isn't me advocating for drug use: I'm just making a tongue-in-cheek reference about pharmaceutical marketing messages.

Ultimately, pharmaceutical companies do want consumers to say "yes" to drugs -- their drugs.

And, as you're about to discover, these companies have used a variety of marketing tactics over the years in order to get consumers to say "yes."

Now -- to be sure -- this is a heavily debated subject, especially when we hone in on direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical marketing (which will be the main focus of this article). And all I mean by "direct-to-consumer" is that marketers aren't appealing to doctors or health care organizations with their marketing messages: They're targeting people/patients directly.

With the direct-to-consumer approach, pharmaceutical companies aren't saying, "Hey, doctors, this drug would be great for your patients!" Instead, they're saying,"Hey, patients, this drug is great! Go tell your doctors about it!"
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