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5 Reasons Pharma Should Reconsider Instagram

From www.intouchsol.com

More and more, Instagram is becoming a viable social channel for pharma, if used in the right way. So here are five reasons we believe pharmas should take a new look at Instagram.

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Doctors ‘distrust apps developed by pharma’ - survey

From www.pharmafile.com

Pharmafile.com is a leading portal for the pharmaceutical industry, providing industry professionals with pharma news, jobs, events, and service company listings.
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Pénurie de vaccins, pourquoi l'industrie pharma ne peut pas agir vite - L'Usine Nouvelle #hcsmeufr

From www.usinenouvelle.com

Les pharmaciens parisiens ont encore tiré la sonnette d’alarme le mardi 28 juillet : les vaccins combinés anticoqueluche,...
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek:

#penurie #vaccin #pharma 

GIE_GERS's curator insight, July 31, 3:44 AM

#penurie #vaccin #pharma 

DIRECT MEDICA's curator insight, Today, 3:30 AM

#penurie #vaccin #pharma 

How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Drugs Better and Faster

From www.popsci.com

When researchers used to try to diagnose and treat diseases, they would often search for one mutation on a single gene that was causing the problem. Or maybe they would look for average effects of a mutation that led to a disease across the entire population. But these approaches ignored the complexities and specifics that truly give rise to disease — demographic information, proteins, multi-gene interactions, environmental effects, and a whole host of other facets.

Until recently, computers weren’t powerful enough to be able to analyze all of this health information, nor were there large enough datasets to test. But the rise of Artificial Intelligence (AI) can tease out interactions from big health data that is emerging from the ability to quickly sequence entire genomes and gather more molecular information than ever before. AI could make precision medicine a reality, since it will hopefully one day be able to identify the unique characteristics an individual has that could lead to certain diseases, and how to treat them.

“That’s what precision medicine is all about. Each of us is different and each of us is genetically unique, so each of us should have a treatment that’s tailored to our individual genetic makeup and our individual environmental history,” said Jason H. Moore, Chief of the Division of Informatics at the University of Pennsylvania. “So I think that’s where artificial intelligence has a very important role to play, is being able to put together multiple genetic and environmental factors to identify the important subgroups.”
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How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Drugs Better and Faster

From www.popsci.com

When researchers used to try to diagnose and treat diseases, they would often search for one mutation on a single gene that was causing the problem. Or maybe they would look for average effects of a mutation that led to a disease across the entire population. But these approaches ignored the complexities and specifics that truly give rise to disease — demographic information, proteins, multi-gene interactions, environmental effects, and a whole host of other facets.

Until recently, computers weren’t powerful enough to be able to analyze all of this health information, nor were there large enough datasets to test. But the rise of Artificial Intelligence (AI) can tease out interactions from big health data that is emerging from the ability to quickly sequence entire genomes and gather more molecular information than ever before. AI could make precision medicine a reality, since it will hopefully one day be able to identify the unique characteristics an individual has that could lead to certain diseases, and how to treat them.

“That’s what precision medicine is all about. Each of us is different and each of us is genetically unique, so each of us should have a treatment that’s tailored to our individual genetic makeup and our individual environmental history,” said Jason H. Moore, Chief of the Division of Informatics at the University of Pennsylvania. “So I think that’s where artificial intelligence has a very important role to play, is being able to put together multiple genetic and environmental factors to identify the important subgroups.”
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New tool uses 'drug spillover' to match cancer patients with treatments

From medicalxpress.com

Targeted therapies attack a cancer's genetic sensitivities. However, it can be difficult to discover the genetics driving a patient's cancer, and the effects of drugs designed to target a genetic abnormality often go beyond their intended target alone. The result is threefold: sometimes a drug is prescribed to treat a target that proves to be irrelevant to the disease, sometimes an existing drug could be used to treat a cancer for which there is no approved targeted therapy, and sometimes a combination of targeted treatments could be used to simultaneously silence more than one genetic cause of a patient's cancer.

A recent article in the journal Bioinformatics from researchers at the University of Colorado Cancer Center describes a new tool that improves the ability to match drugs to disease: the Kinase Addiction Ranker (KAR) predicts what genetics are truly driving the cancer in any population of cells and chooses the best "kinase inhibitor" to silence these dangerous genetic causes of disease.

"For example, we know that the disease Chronic Myeloid Leukemia is driven by the fusion gene bcr-abl and we can treat this with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib, which targets this abnormality. But for many other cancers, the genetic cause and best treatments are less distinct. The KAR tool clarifies the drug or combination of drugs that best targets the specific genetic abnormalities driving a patient's cancer," says Aik Choon Tan, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center, associate professor of Bioinformatics at the CU School of Medicine, and the paper's senior author.
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Patient engagement and DTC marketing

From worldofdtcmarketing.com

KEY TAKEAWAY: 30% of social media users prefer social care to phoning customer service and this is happening across age groups and income brackets: 17% of people older than 55 prefer social media over the telephone for service, and nearly half of people earning more than $200k per year prefer social media over live interactions for customer service.

So how can pharma companies increase their ROI thru social media when the FDA has punted on social media marketing guidelines?

First, let’s remember that the most successful social media interactions are personal, genuine, and relevant. This means that pharma needs dedicated social media people who understand what they can and can’t do.  It also means that taking some risk at the expense of engaging people who are tired of being seen as just another nameless patient.

According to Harvard Business Review the key steps to engaging people on social media are;

Gather and track the right information. Social media is in effect a massive focus group that can provide intelligence about brand perception, services, competitors, and potentially disruptive trends. It’s easy to be overwhelmed by it all, so companies should prioritize gathering social data that indicate trigger events. These signal the moment when patients are more open to, asking for or filling an Rx for your product.

Put in place processes to act on the insights. Some 72% of people who comment on a brand on Twitter expect an answer within an hour. Pharma has to develop guidelines for how to act when a particular event occurs. For example, someone asking about side effects for a particular drug could be directed to your safety page on your website while others questions can be answered within current FDA guidelines.

Measure your engagement.  You can easily use web metrics to measure traffic from your social media interactions using specific URL’s or even coupons with special redemption codes.

Pharma DTC marketers cannot continue to talk TO patients they have to be willing to take some risk to engage them and help them choose treatments.  Yes, there is a risk, but that risk can be managed by using people who understand social media and pharma guidelines.


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What the Latest FTC Guidelines Mean to Pharma Marketers

From www.intouchsol.com

As pharma marketers, we tend to listen closely when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues guidance, such as their draft guidance on correcting misinformation online, anduser-generated content. In June this year, however, it was guidelines from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) that got our attention.

The updates — published via the agency’s frequently asked questions  and social media marketing guidelines  — focus primarily on testimonials and endorsements. With the rise in popularity of product reviews, the FTC is interested in ensuring consumers can clearly tell the difference between an honest third-party review and a paid endorsement. This has implications for pharmas who work with consumers and HCPs to provide paid testimonials or endorsements.

UPDATES TO ENDORSEMENTS AND TESTIMONIALS

In its first update to the social media marketing guidelines since 2010, the FTC released several guidelines on how to participate in social media when endorsing a product or service, or paying someone to do so on your behalf. The overall goal of the guidelines is to ensure consumers can clearly identify what is marketing and what is an authentic consumer review or endorsement.

The update could impact employees of a company who talk about their products or services online, as well as pharmaceutical companies that work with patient advocates, influencers or KOLs. The guidelines apply to both reviews of the product and any subsequent services, such as patient programs that those individuals may represent.

The updated guidance focuses on three key aspects of endorsements:

  • What an endorsement is and who an endorser is/can be
  • What the endorsement can and should include
  • How to represent yourself if you are an endorser

WHAT AN ENDORSEMENT IS

Within the update, the FTC clearly states what qualifies as a (paid) endorsement, as well as who an endorser is:

An endorsement means  any advertising message (including verbal statements, demonstrations, or depictions of the name, signature, likeness or other identifying personal characteristics of an individual or the name or seal of an organization) … even if the views expressed by that party are identical to those of the sponsoring advertiser. The party whose opinions, beliefs, findings, or experience the message appears to reflect will be called the endorser and may be an individual, group, or institution.

For pharmaceutical companies, this could apply to patient advocates who represent the brand, employees of that company and/or any agency that represents them.

WHAT AN ENDORSEMENT SHOULD INCLUDE

Above all, the FTC requires that paid endorsements be accurate and honest. Anyone who is paid to endorse a product or service must be a “bona fide user” of that product or service at the time of the endorsement. Additionally, when a consumer is paid to endorse his or her experience with a product or service, they must cite substantial facts and figures that validate their experience. A paid endorser cannot make claims about a product that requires proof the company doesn’t have, and they must disclose that their experience is not typical.

HOW ENDORSERS SHOULD REPRESENT THEMSELVES

It is important to provide clear direction to your paid endorsers. Anyone paid to endorse or represent a product or service must “clearly and conspicuously” disclose any and all material connections to the company. Any connection between an endorser and the company that consumers would not expect and that might affect how consumers evaluate the endorsement must be disclosed. To make a disclosure “clear and conspicuous” :

  • For print or web, it must be:
    • Close to the claims to which they relate
    • In a font that is easy to read
    • In a shade that stands out against the background
  • For video ads, it must be:
    • On the screen long enough to be noticed, read and understood
  • For audio disclosures, it must be:
    • Read at a cadence that is easy for consumers to follow and in words consumers will understand

Disclosures should include any sort of payment received, including free products. However, this guidance does not require the endorser to disclose how much compensation they received.

UPDATES TO FTC FAQ

Also in June, the FTC made several updates and additions to its What People Are Asking page on its website. The page is intended to provide answers to questions about the FTC’s Endorsement Guides, which provide information and direction on ensuring product endorsements remain honest and do not mislead consumers.

The updates to the FAQ focus primarily on the implications of endorsements in social media and include an emphasis on character limits, contests and giveaways, sharing content (including images) on social networks, and video content. Pharmaceutical companies that work with patient advocates who use social networks should evaluate how they are promoting those advocates. Any paid influencers speaking on a pharma’s behalf must clearly and accurately disclose their relationship when they post, comment or share on social networks.

The full FAQ can be found on the FTC website here; below is a summary of the direction that most often affects pharmaceutical marketing.

  1. Know your medium. The FTC has clearly laid out guidelines for newer social networks not previously adressed, including Twitter and Pinterest. Character limitations on any social network, including the 140-character limit on Twitter, are no longer and adequate reason for not presenting users with all the information they need. Clear disclosure language must be present in any tweet from a paid endorser or any tweet promoting a contest or giveaway. Additionally, sharing a link on a social network via a Share button requires a disclosure if you are a paid influencer or employee of that company. This also applies to images that are shared without text, specifically those that are shared via the “Pin It” button for Pinterest.
  2. Evaluate video content. The FTC also updated guidelines on video content that features a paid endorser. Any video endorsements must have a “clear and conspicuous” disclosure within the actual video and not just in the description. The FTC defines clear and conspicuous as “on the screen long enough to be noticed, read, and understood.” For pharmaceutical companies that feature patient advocates in video marketing efforts, disclaimer language must be included in each individual video.
  3. Employees are endorsers, too. Employees of a pharmaceutical company, including any employees at ad agencies or PR firms that represent them, are considered paid endorsers if they are talking about the company’s products or services. Any employee doing so must clearly identify their relationship in each post, and a sentence in their social media profile is not sufficient disclosure. Pharmaceutical companies should develop clear social media guidelines for all employees and agency affiliations.

IMPLICATIONS

With the updates to both the social media marketing guidelines and the FAQ, the FTC clearly states what constitutes an endorser and how to treat communication that comes from them. This impacts pharmaceutical companies in several ways:

  • Pharmaceutical companies that run patient advocate and KOL programs should evaluate any communication these representatives make on behalf of the company. Pharma marketers should work with their agencies to provide direction — including clear language — for them to follow. This includes ensuring payment and connections between the company and patient are disclosed in any endorsement.
  • Pharmaceutical companies that produce videos and images and run contests through social media should review those programs to ensure they are in line with FTC guidance.
  • Employees of a pharmaceutical company are considered endorsers when they talk about a product or service online, even if they are not specifically paid to do so. They must disclose their relationship with the company when interacting online. This guidance also extends to agencies that represent the pharmaceutical company.

As communication and advocacy evolve in a social age, so must pharma marketers. Intouch Solutions will continue to monitor additional guidance and publish updates as appropriate.

For more information and ideas about working with influencers and advocates in a compliant manner, contact your Intouch Solutions representative.

The information contained in this document is for general guidance on matters of interest only. Intouch Solutions makes no representations as to the accuracy or any other aspect of information contained in linked websites. The information contained in this document is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice.

 


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5 tendances en Marketing Digital pour 2015

From www.slideshare.net

5 insights en marketing digital pour préparer un dispositif de marque en 2015 : mobile, social media, design interactif, analytics et SEM. Conférence réalisée au Palais de Tokyo par les agences NiceToMeetYou et Open Linking, le 27/11/14.

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La revolution digitale dans le BtoB par jeremy dumont pour R9

From www.slideshare.net

Les clients sont connectés "anywhere, anytime, anyhow", ils achètent de manière différente ce qui induit un challenge dans la relation fournisseurs et les réseaux de distribution : le marketing doit donc s’adapter avec de nouveaux...

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Survey: 59% of Healthcare Orgs Lack Digital Health Strategy - HIT Consultant #hcsmeufr

From hitconsultant.net

59% of healthcare organizations are either behind schedule with their digital health strategy or have no digital health strategy currently in place.
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The role of pharma in the digital world of patient and doctors

From www.pmlive.com

When talking to doctors today, pharma has had to completely re-evaluate its former sales model.

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Roche launches FDA-cleared diabetes app with insulin calculator in US

From mobihealthnews.com

Last month, Roche quietly launched its Accu-Chek Connect app, a diabetes management app which contains, among other things, an unprecented feature: a prescription insulin bolus calculator called Bolus Advisor.

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How e-detailing can increase access to HCPs

From anthillagency.com

The benefits of digital detailing don’t stop at the cost savings or the rich streams of customer data that it produces. Closed loop marketing can provide more access to healthcare professionals too.
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Et si Google identifiait les effets secondaires des médicaments ? #hcsmeufr

From www.lequotidiendupharmacien.fr

La Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ne recule devant aucun moyen pour améliorer sa pharmacovigilance. Ainsi, l’agence américaine a entamé
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Should pharma's use of medical conference hashtags be curbed?

From www.linkedin.com

A group of scientists and HCPs have published a paper indicating that, through their use of hashtags during medical society conferences, biopharmas and medical device companies exert a disproportionate influence on healthcare providers to promote their products or services instead of sharing unbiased, evidence-based information.

The full analysis with comments (including mine) can be viewed here:
https://thewinnower.com/papers/1476-measuring-the-influence-of-commercial-entities-in-the-twitter-backchannels-of-medical-conferences-the-miceproject

I must admit this aspect of pharma’s Twitter contributions to hashtags is one that I had not fully considered, possibly because I have been far more concerned with encouraging the industry to use social media and engage with HCPs openly. We should not forget that it was only a few years ago that the very first pharmas plucked up sufficient courage and developed appropriate internal guidelines to enable them to contribute to conference hashtags; Boehringer Ingelheim springs instantly to mind.

Yet, most importantly, the analysis raises some critical issues concerning the industry’s apparent power to influence: should its behaviour be curbed or regulated in some way?

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Novartis veut aller "au-delà du médicament"

From www.ticsante.com

BALE (Suisse), 22 juillet 2015 (TICsanté) - Novartis ambitionne de coupler ses molécules en développement à d'autres technologies, produits et services, principalement digitaux afin d'aller "au-delà du médicament" en fournissant des "solutions thérapeutiques holistiques", a déclaré le directeur mondial du développement, Vas Narasimhan, le 30 juin lors d'un voyage de presse consacré à l'innovation.

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FDA clears Propeller Health digital adherence platform for GSK inhaler as beyond the pill trend grows

From medcitynews.com

A few months after the FDA cleared digital health company Propeller Health’ first collaboration with Boehringer Ingelheim Propeller Health remote monitoring platform for drug developers using its Respimat inhaler for people with chronic conditions,...
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Métier : Directeur de la stratégie digitale / Chief Digital Officer

From www.clementine.jobs

Toutes les clés pour comprendre du métier de #CDO. Le Chief Digital Officer (ou « Directeur de la Stratégie Digitale » en Français) a pour mission de mener à bien
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Social Media and Pharma Industry

From healthbizinforma.com

The rise of digital technologies has had a transformational impact across everyday life and business globally – including the healthcare industry.

Exponential growth in the use of the internet, social media, and apps; as well as the uptake of personal computing, smartphones and tablets by all healthcare stakeholders – patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals and payers – is well documented.

As a result, the role of social media in healthcare and impact on patient engagement is moving to centre-stage, propelled not only by technology, but also by patient demand and growing influence of the digital native generation.

The term social media encompasses social networking sites (e.g. Facebook, Twitter), collaborative services, blogs, content hosting sites (e.g. Wikipedia), and virtual communities.

Markets have become conversations, and social media is the online platform and location where these conversations take place.

Social media creates highly interactive platforms through which individuals and communities share, co-create, comment on, discuss, share, and modify, user-generated content. It provides a way for people to participate in conversations; to tap into what people are saying about a brand, a product or a service.

By participating in these conversations, companies are exposed to what their customers are thinking and saying – these are the insights that can lead to making better business decisions.

Social Media also plays an important role in establishing communication with consumers and disseminating relevant and accurate information.

Social media has changed the way we communicate – between organisations, communities, and individuals.

Although the pharma industry is heavily regulated and thus forced to work within much stricter guidelines, it does not mean that social media as a marketing and communications platform should be ignored.

Social media marketing has become a way in which companies engage with their customers.

Over the past few years there has been a general understanding among pharma companies that they can’t use or benefit from the use of social media, things have now shifted to a point where they should be asking ‘how can we use social media?’

By avoiding social media, companies are missing out on important opportunities to enhance their online presence and connect with their customers.

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Pharma needs to get into digital health data game to stay competitive, study says

From www.fiercepharma.com

That Apple watch you are wearing may allow you to text and listen to music, and it can track your activity. But it may also be conducting a postmarket study that will help cut the price of some of your prescription drugs in the future.
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Exploring full potential of e-detailing data

From anthillagency.com

Today’s high quality e-detailing data can create better quality conversations with healthcare professionals and result in improved access and relationships.
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ENGAGE: Keep health apps simple, outcomes-focused

From medcitynews.com

Healthcare app developers take note: “Patients are people. They’re only patients part of the time,” advised Neal Sofian, vice president of engagement and innovation at Vivacity, a wellness subsidiary of Premera Blue Cross in Washington state.More than a few developers focus too much on customer retention rather than app efficacy, according to Sofian. If the health app is to address a one-time concern rather than a chronic disease, retention is far less important than building something that people use when they really need it, he said.“I don’t think people give a damn about their health unless they’re sick, then they care a lot,” Sofian said Tuesday at the MedCity ENGAGE conference in Bethesda, Md. “Illness is not the same as health, but that’s what we’ve been building on,” Sofian added, to some applause.

Jerome Leleu's curator insight, July 16, 1:57 AM

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