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Deux types d'activités fondamentalement différentes #médicaments #pharma

From www.lesechos.fr

La production d'un médicament relève de deux mondes qui évoluent tout à fait différemment. La fabricatio
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Big pharma turns to artificial intelligence to speed drug discovery, GSK signs deal

From ca.news.yahoo.com

The world's leading drug companies are turning to artificial intelligence to improve the hit-and-miss business of finding new medicines, with GlaxoSmithKline unveiling a new $43 million deal in the field on Sunday. Other pharmaceutical giants including Merck & Co, Johnson & Johnson and Sanofi are also exploring the potential of artificial intelligence (AI)
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Beyond KOL Marketing: Tapping Digital Opinion Influencers

From www.pharmexec.com

Pharma firms have long recognized the power of key opinion leaders (KOLs) in driving influence through traditional channels: journals, speaking events and word of mouth. The problem, however, is that healthcare providers (HCPs) and patients are acquiring information about disease and treatment in the online world – and many KOLs are not “digital opinion influencers,” or DOIs. This creates an opportunity – strategic DOI identification, outreach and management – for brand, communications and medical teams that is often overlooked or poorly addressed.

Sizing the opportunity

This opportunity is largest for pharmaceutical companies providing drugs to address chronic conditions to active patient communities, in which there are high levels of treatment innovation. For example, we recently conducted a study for a pharma client to analyze the healthcare provider DOI community across seven markets for a chronic condition. The results were notable. Of 4,000 HCPs in the community, we identified 1,400 active posters who posted at least three times in the past year. And of these, we identified 131 influencers driving the lion’s share of influence. Interestingly, more than a quarter of these were not traditional KOLs already on the client’s radar. Further, we discovered active posters regularly reached an aggregate audience of approximately 2.8 million followers and fans, many of whom were strategically important prescribers, patient prospects and payer influencers.

This example illustrates the potential power of managing relationships with a small number of DOIs, who act as a force multiplier for life sciences peer-influence programs. A traditional KOL may have influence in terms of the articles written or the conferences at which they speak, but a DOI has an outsized reach made possible through social media.

Who are DOIs?

Digital opinion influencers are influential members of a health community turned to for advice, opinions and information. Their influence flows from reach (followers), their resonance (content sharing) and relevance (topics discussed). Their distinguishing characteristic (versus traditional KOLs) is their use of social media to either create or amplify messages. DOIs are both medical professionals and non-professionals.   

In the medical world, DOIs are typically drawn to social media as a platform for building their reputations. These DOIs share opinions on therapies, discuss presentations from medical congresses and share advice on disease and patient management. Another segment — researchers and academics — frequently communicate models of disease understanding based on the latest studies. These professional DOIs have converged around Twitter as the preferred channel, particularly around major medical conferences, while simultaneously turning to closed healthcare provider (HCP) platforms for peer-to-peer discussions.

In the patient world, DOIs include patients and caregivers who typically emerge from personal experience — the quest for advice, information or connection — which transforms into a mission. Health bloggers and so-called e-patients (who take an active online role in their health) have amassed large followings, sometimes leveraging their influence to form non-profits, online media companies or patient associations. Traditional patient groups have also joined the fray, seeing new ways to reach audiences. Patient DOIs use a variety of channels (Facebook, Instagram and blogs, to name a few) and are not concentrated in a single medium (like HCPs with their use of Twitter).  

Based on our analyses for a range of pharma clients, we have found that DOIs and KOLs often exist in largely different universes, with little overlap. Typically, fewer than 20 percent of KOLs will also have a social media presence and just a handful will rank alongside DOIs in terms of online reach. In the patient world, this is to be expected as many DOIs are individuals as opposed to patient advocacy groups that would already be on a pharmaceutical company’s radar.

Identifying, profiling and engaging DOIs

 

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Teva Pharma CEO Warns Industry Faces "Huge Digital Disruption" - Duh!

From www.cnbc.com

The global health-care industry faces a "huge disruption" as technology heavyweights jostle for consumers with traditional providers, the chief executive of a major pharmaceutical company said.

 

Yitzhak Peterburg, interim president and CEO at Teva Pharmaceutical, told CNBC on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum's annual June meeting in Dalian that digital disruption is an enabler for health-care and pharmaceutical companies to serve today's customers.

 

"I am a very great believer that we are now in a huge disruption within the health-care (industry), and I think it will affect our industry," said Peterburg. "For me, the digital reform, or whatever we see, is a huge enabler."

 

Teva Pharmaceutical, headquartered in Israel, calls itself he largest producer of generic medicines. In specialty medicines, Teva has treatment for multiple sclerosis as well as late-stage development programs for other disorders of the central nervous system.

 

Big technology names have begun looking into ways they can disrupt the health-care sector through big data analytics, artificial intelligence and other technologies.

 

Earlier this month, CNBC reported that a secretive team within Apple's growing health unit has been talking to developers, hospitals and other industry groups about bringing clinical data, such as detailed lab results and allergy lists, to the iPhone. Meanwhile, it was reported in May that Amazon was hiring a business lead to figure out how the company can break into the multibillion-dollar pharmacy market.

 

Peterburg explained that pharmaceutical companies need to think about ways to navigate this changing landscape, where they face increasing competition from non-pharma players. Being good at manufacturing pills and injections is no longer enough for pharma companies, he said. Consumers, he added, have also changed and they expect very different value from pharmaceutical companies and the health care industry as a whole.

 

An employee collects newly-manufactured pills at the tablet production plant at Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.'s headquarters in Jerusalem, Israel

"Part of my competitors are not only the Novartis of the world, and the other pharmas, but really the Amazons and Googles," he said. "Like any company, we need to think about where we invest and how we invest, and what is the right time to jump into the water."

 

But the answer to the question is not straightforward

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Santé : Pierre Fabre organise le premier chatbot challenge

From www.lasemainedecastres.fr

L’engagement de Pierre Fabre dans l’innovation prend de nombreuses formes et l’e-santé est au cœur de ses réflexions. L’Université d’été de la e-santé, organisée depuis 2006 par le Centre Européen d’Entreprises et d’Innovation Castres Mazamet Technopole, est devenu u
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Diabète : Roche acquiert la plateforme de services e-santé mySugr MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé

From www.mypharma-editions.com

Roche vient d'annoncer l'acquisition de toutes les parts de son partenaire mySugr GmbH. Comptant plus d’un million d’utilisateurs dans le monde, mySugr est l’une des principales plateformes de services mobiles de gestion du diabète sur le marché et fera partie intégrante de la nouvelle plateforme de Roche proposant des services numériques axés sur le patient dans le domaine des soins liés au diabète.
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Influencer Marketing for Pharmaceuticals: Effective Patient Influencers

From www.wegohealth.com

Influencer Marketing – now there’s a term that wasn’t around “back in the day” when many were just starting out. So, what exactly is Influencer Marketing?

As seen on Huffington Post, Influencer Marketing “is simply the action of promoting and selling products or services through people (influencers) who have the capacity to have an effect on the character of a brand.” That is, indeed, a very simplistic way of putting it. But, while the term “Influencer Marketing” is relatively new, the concept is not and has been evolving with the times.

Turning specifically to influencer marketing for pharmaceuticals, let’s narrow the focus to how healthcare and pharmaceutical companies partner with Patient Influencers. In his article, Perspectives on Influencer Marketing in Healthcare, Matt Breese explains that “patients are, by nature, influencers. A mother influences her family’s healthcare decisions. A cancer survivor’s poignant story influences other cancer patients. A patient with a positive hospital experience influences friends and neighbors.”

Patient Influencers do often play a role in the decision-making process of fellow patients. You might ask why someone would trust a fellow patient over a representative of the healthcare or pharmaceutical industry. As Fabrizio Perrone spells out for us in his article, Influencer Marketing & the Healthcare Industry:

People look for a familiar tone that presents facts and other types of information in an authentic manner, especially when it comes to healthcare as it is a sensitive area in their lives.

Enter P2P [peer-to-peer] influencers and subject matter experts. People want to be engaged and educated by these two within the healthcare and medical communities. P2P influencers share their practical experiences in a way that makes them an appealing resource for their followers. Subject matter experts deliver complex medical information to consumers in a way that is easily understood and related to.

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