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Digital and Mobile Health Technology for Schizophrenia

From thedoctorweighsin.com

The future of schizophrenia is looking more and more digital as tech is being used to increase physical activity, deliver therapy & social support, help monitor
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Reframing Patient Care through eHealth: A Powerful Toolkit for Patient-Specific Engagement - Welcome to EngagingPatients.org!

From www.engagingpatients.org

eHealth technologies have potential for engaging patients in their own care but must be closely aligned with a patient’s experiences and engagement needs.
Your Patient Engagement Team's curator insight, April 15, 2016 11:21 AM

Patient experience must be considered when developing eHealth tools to help boost engagement. Without considering the patient's journey, efforts will fall flat.

Smoking cessation app-maker partners with GSK to offer nicotine patches

From www.mobihealthnews.com

Digital smoking cessation company 2Morrow has partnered with GlaxoSmithKline, makers of Nicoderm patches, to offer the company’s Nicoderm CQ Patch to smokers who complete 2morrow’s cessation program.
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 Pfizer donne le coup d’envoi du premier mHealth Hackathon à Bruxelles

From www.mediplanet.be

Le week-end du 18 mars, la société pharmaceutique Pfizer accueille dans ses bureaux 100 profils créatifs pour le tout premier mHealth Hackathon officiel en Belgique.

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Is Digital Health Improving the Patient Experience? | Centric Digital

From centricdigital.com

If 2015 healthcare investment levels are any indication, investors the world over are focusing on patient experience above all other digital health investment subsectors.
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek:
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
 
eMedToday's curator insight, March 3, 2016 2:57 AM
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
 
jean-francois delas's curator insight, March 3, 2016 12:44 PM
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 
 
 
 
 
 
Centric Digital's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:12 PM
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 

 
Enterprises that invest in technologies designed to improve patient experiences and satisfaction are investing in both their clients’ health and their own. 

 
 

Patients with Chronic Diseases Want Mobile Apps to Communicate with Their Docs

From mhealthwatch.com

A new study released by mobile engagement provider Mobiquityexposes the “gap between patients’ demand for taking control of their own health and the accessibility or availability of digital and mobile tools when it comes to the management of chronic health conditions.”


The study revealed that one third of patients with chronic diseases don’t currently use mobile apps to manage their conditions, but would like to start.


In fact, the report summary notes, one in four respondents feel that “wearable devices are the way of the future.”


Interestingly, almost 50 percent of patients believe they should bring information/digital tools to their doctor – rather than the other way around – reinforcing their desire to be actively involved in managing their health rather than trust their doctors to exclusively manage it.

When asked about the most challenging aspects of managing their conditions, 26 percent of respondents agree that finding direct means of communicating with health professionals presents the biggest hurdle. Other top challenges include:


  • Monitoring changes in health (25%)
  • Remembering to take medication (20%)
  • Keeping up to date with medical advancements, treatments, etc. (18%)


“It’s clear the potential for digital solutions is vast: 40 percent of respondents feel mobile tools play an important role in overall healthcare,” the report summary reads.

Pharma Guy's curator insight, November 28, 2015 9:06 AM

For more about what patients want in mHealth apps, read "Patient Activists Demand Higher Quality Mobile Apps"; http://bit.ly/pmn130701pdf  

#Pharma Mobile Health Apps: If You Build Them, Will Physicians "Prescribe" Them?

From hitconsultant.net

It’s hard to find a pharma or medical device company these days that doesn’t have at least one mobile app in development. And now that, as of February 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued guidance on which apps need to be regulated and which ones don’t, it will be interesting to see if this almost exponential development trend continues.


Federal guidance alone doesn’t guarantee an app’s success, and there is still plenty of playing field for developers in the health and wellness space for apps that do not require 510(k) submission. Therefore, developers and marketers alike must keep in mind these three key drivers of mobile health app adoption.


Awareness

In a 2014 poll by QuantiaMD, only 37% of physicians surveyed said that they had recommended a mobile app to their patients. In another QuantiaMD poll, 42% of physicians said they would notrecommend a mobile health app to patients because there was no regulatory oversight (though the new FDA guidance should help with this). In addition, another 37% percent had no idea what mobile health apps are out there.


In spite of physicians being split on the utility of apps, consumers are downloading them at a rapid pace. In fact, it is estimated that within the next three years half of all smartphone and tablet users will have at least one mobile health or wellness app, like Lose It!, RunKeeper, or Glucose Buddy. But, downloading doesn’t necessarily mean they are using them! There is enormous opportunity for healthcare marketers to more effectively demonstrate the myriad of app benefits to patients and physicians alike.


More here...

Pharma Guy's curator insight, April 7, 2015 7:19 AM


Experts say that the bulk of the apps recommended by physicians are related to diet and fitness, and that few physicians are “prescribing” apps with the expectation of receiving follow-up data. See here: http://sco.lt/5igoc5

Survey: 46 percent of clinicians plan to use health apps in practices by 2020 | mobihealthnews

From mobihealthnews.com

Jenna Collins's comment, March 25, 2015 11:09 AM
This is very interesting as in this digital age, there truly is an app for almost anything. I can see the benefits of health providers using such apps to track and maintain information.

Stop the Mobile Insanity! New Strategies for Pharma in the mHealth Market

From www.talk.pharma-mkting.com

Pharmaguy interviews Ralf-Gordon Jahns, Managing Director, research2guidance, who talks about his company's Pharma App Benchmarking 2014 report and what changes pharmaceutical companies must make in order to deliver more useful mHealth apps for healthcare professionals and patients and thereby become successful in the mHealth market.
Pharma Guy's curator insight, February 17, 2015 6:09 AM


Questions/Topics of Discussion


  • Please review for us research2guidance's studies on successful mhealth app publishers.
  • What differentiates successful publishers from the less successful ones: What works? What doesn't work?
  • What sets them apart in terms of platform choice, experience, tool usage, API usage, size of app portfolio, etc.
  • Is it a good strategy for pharma to develop and publish the next 700 apps in the next five years? What other roles might help Pharma increase their return on investment in the app market?
  • Tell us about the mHealth Developer Economics survey that was just released?

Pharma Marketing Blog: FDA Says It Will Not Regulate Low-Risk Mobile Health Apps as Medical Devices

From pharmamkting.blogspot.com

"CDRH [FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health] does not intend to examine low risk general wellness products to determine whether they are devices within the meaning of the FD&C Act," says a new guidance posted today on the FDA website ("General Wellness: Policy for Low Risk Devices. Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff").


Note: There is no "2." in the algorithm, but I assume it's the last paragraph. In any case, the examples cited by the FDA may better illustrate FDA's thinking. Three out of 4 of these examples involve mobile apps:

Illustrative Example 1: A mobile application plays music to “soothe and relax” an individual and to “manage stress.”


These claims relate only to relaxation or stress management, not to any disease or medical condition, and thus are general wellness claims. In addition, the technology to play music does not present inherent risks to a user’s safety. Therefore, this product meets both criteria for a low risk general wellness product. 


More examples...


Pharma Guy's curator insight, January 17, 2015 8:42 AM


CDRH’s general wellness policy does not extend to devices that present inherent risks to a user’s safety.


Whether a device is low risk for purposes of this guidance is determined by whether or not the product:

  1. is invasive;

  2. involves an intervention or technology that may pose a risk to a user’s safety if device

    controls are not applied, such as risks from lasers, radiation exposure, or implants;

  3. raises novel questions of usability; or

  4. raises questions of biocompatibility.


If the answer to any of these questions is yes, the device is not a low risk general wellness product and is not covered by this guidance. 


Some see a future battle on what is & isn't low-risk. "If it's up to companies everything will be low-risk," said Moira Gunn (@biotechnation) on Twitter.

Joel Finkle's curator insight, January 19, 2015 9:43 AM

FDA clarifies what apps don't require review: Stress management, activity and food tracking, as examples.

New survey : mobile services desired by US patients from their doctors

From www.harrisinteractive.com

 more than one-third of respondents who are online said they were "very" or "extremely" interested in using smartphones or tablets to ask their doctors questions, make appointments or get medical test results.

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