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9- PHARMA MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING  by PHARMAGEEK
MULTI CHANNEL MARKETING IN PHARMA / MULTICANAL DANS LA PHARMA
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Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Pharmaguy Interviews Industry Insiders
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Stop the Mobile Insanity! New Strategies for Pharma in the mHealth Market

Stop the Mobile Insanity! New Strategies for Pharma in the mHealth Market | 9- PHARMA MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING  by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Pharmaguy interviews Ralf-Gordon Jahns, Managing Director, research2guidance, who talks about his company's Pharma App Benchmarking 2014 report and what changes pharmaceutical companies must make in order to deliver more useful mHealth apps for healthcare professionals and patients and thereby become successful in the mHealth market.

Via Pharma Guy
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, February 17, 6:09 AM


Questions/Topics of Discussion


  • Please review for us research2guidance's studies on successful mhealth app publishers.
  • What differentiates successful publishers from the less successful ones: What works? What doesn't work?
  • What sets them apart in terms of platform choice, experience, tool usage, API usage, size of app portfolio, etc.
  • Is it a good strategy for pharma to develop and publish the next 700 apps in the next five years? What other roles might help Pharma increase their return on investment in the app market?
  • Tell us about the mHealth Developer Economics survey that was just released?
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from 1- E-HEALTH by PHARMAGEEK - E SANTE par PHARMAGEEK
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New survey : mobile services desired by US patients from their doctors

New survey : mobile services desired by US patients from their doctors | 9- PHARMA MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING  by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

 more than one-third of respondents who are online said they were "very" or "extremely" interested in using smartphones or tablets to ask their doctors questions, make appointments or get medical test results.


Via Olivier Delannoy, eMedToday, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing
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Pharma Marketing Blog: FDA Says It Will Not Regulate Low-Risk Mobile Health Apps as Medical Devices

Pharma Marketing Blog: FDA Says It Will Not Regulate Low-Risk Mobile Health Apps as Medical Devices | 9- PHARMA MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING  by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

"CDRH [FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health] does not intend to examine low risk general wellness products to determine whether they are devices within the meaning of the FD&C Act," says a new guidance posted today on the FDA website ("General Wellness: Policy for Low Risk Devices. Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff").


Note: There is no "2." in the algorithm, but I assume it's the last paragraph. In any case, the examples cited by the FDA may better illustrate FDA's thinking. Three out of 4 of these examples involve mobile apps:

Illustrative Example 1: A mobile application plays music to “soothe and relax” an individual and to “manage stress.”


These claims relate only to relaxation or stress management, not to any disease or medical condition, and thus are general wellness claims. In addition, the technology to play music does not present inherent risks to a user’s safety. Therefore, this product meets both criteria for a low risk general wellness product. 


More examples...



Via Pharma Guy, eMedToday
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, January 17, 8:42 AM


CDRH’s general wellness policy does not extend to devices that present inherent risks to a user’s safety.


Whether a device is low risk for purposes of this guidance is determined by whether or not the product:

  1. is invasive;

  2. involves an intervention or technology that may pose a risk to a user’s safety if device

    controls are not applied, such as risks from lasers, radiation exposure, or implants;

  3. raises novel questions of usability; or

  4. raises questions of biocompatibility.


If the answer to any of these questions is yes, the device is not a low risk general wellness product and is not covered by this guidance. 


Some see a future battle on what is & isn't low-risk. "If it's up to companies everything will be low-risk," said Moira Gunn (@biotechnation) on Twitter.

Joel Finkle's curator insight, January 19, 9:43 AM

FDA clarifies what apps don't require review: Stress management, activity and food tracking, as examples.