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Redefining medicine with apps and iPads

Redefining medicine with apps and iPads | McKenna Loves Opera | Scoop.it

Dr. Alvin Rajkomar was doing rounds with his team at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center when he came upon a puzzling case: a frail, elderly patient with a dangerously low sodium level.

 

As a third-year resident in internal medicine, Dr. Rajkomar was the senior member of the team, and the others looked to him for guidance. An infusion of saline was the answer, but the tricky part lay in the details. Concentration? Volume? Improper treatment could lead to brain swelling, seizures or even death.

 

Dr. Rajkomar had been on call for 24 hours and was exhausted, but the clinical uncertainty was “like a shot of adrenaline,” he said. He reached into a deep pocket of his white coat and produced not a well-thumbed handbook but his iPhone.

 

With a tap on an app called MedCalc, he had enough answers within a minute to start the saline at precisely the right rate.

 

The history of medicine is defined by advances born of bioscience. But never before has it been driven to this degree by digital technology.

 

The proliferation of gadgets, apps and Web-based information has given clinicians — especially young ones like Dr. Rajkomar, who is 28 — a black bag of new tools: new ways to diagnose symptoms and treat patients, to obtain and share information, to think about what it means to be both a doctor and a patient.

 

And it has created something of a generational divide. Older doctors admire, even envy, their young colleagues’ ease with new technology. But they worry that the human connections that lie at the core of medical practice are at risk of being lost.


Via Andrew Spong
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eMedToday's curator insight, August 19, 2013 10:28 PM

There is a need on a e detailing platform to have clinical reference material as shown in this post

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Classical Mp3 Sites - 100% Free UK Web Directory

Classical Mp3 Sites - 100% Free UK Web Directory | McKenna Loves Opera | Scoop.it
Online resource of not only the most famous chef-d'oeuvre of classical music but also less renowned. Possibility to download compositions of all these genres right on this website.

Via Laura Lawrie
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Rescooped by McKenna Slack from Cancer Biology Research Digest
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Stem Cell Source Best Decided by Patient Profile

Stem Cell Source Best Decided by Patient Profile | McKenna Loves Opera | Scoop.it

Survival rates are similar whether transplanted stem cells are from peripheral blood or bone marrow, although each has unique benefits, researchers found. But peripheral blood stem cells appeared to reduce the risk of graft failure, while a bone marrow transplant lowered the risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).

 

Primary source: New England Journal of Medicine
Anasetti C, et al "Peripheral-blood stem cells versus bone marrow from unrelated donors" N Engl J Med 2012; 367(16): 1487-1496.


Via Cancer Commons
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Rescooped by McKenna Slack from Classical Music News
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Sydney Opera House Renames Auditorium For Joan Sutherland

Sydney Morning Herald 03/17/12...

Via Chris Jobse
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Rescooped by McKenna Slack from Cancer Biology Research Digest
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Living Much Longer With Brain Cancer

Living Much Longer With Brain Cancer | McKenna Loves Opera | Scoop.it

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have developed a vaccine that helps the immune system attack these tumors called glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

 

In a Phase I clinical trial, which tests drug safety, participants lived a median (middle number) of 38.4 months. Typical lifespan with these tumors is 14.6 months after standard therapy which includes radiation and chemotherapy.

 

The time before the tumor returned was also longer - 16.9 months compared to 6.9 months.

 

Some 49 to 66 months following treatment, six patients were free of the disease, and the tumor had not returned. Another eight patients were still alive.


Via Cancer Commons
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Rescooped by McKenna Slack from Psychology and Brain News
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How fear skews our spatial perception

How fear skews our spatial perception | McKenna Loves Opera | Scoop.it
That snake heading towards you may be further away than it appears. Fear can skew our perception of approaching objects, causing us to underestimate the distance of a threatening one, finds a study published in Current Biology.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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