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From Textbook to Real Life: The Mayan Ruins

From Textbook to Real Life: The Mayan Ruins | Mayan Ancient Civilization | Scoop.it
Visiting a real Mayan Ruin is better than reading from a textbook. The Cahal Pech Mayan Ruins in Belize is worth visiting.

Via BelizeNet.com
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Five Common Myths about Belize Busted

Five Common Myths about Belize Busted | Mayan Ancient Civilization | Scoop.it

These aren't the myths you're thinking.  This humorous article from the Huffington Post dispels some travel based myths.  Belize isn't an island, has great Mayan ruins, like Caracol pictured above, and surely isn't boring.  Where'd they come up with those myths, anyways?  Xunantunich and Chaa Creek are both given as myth busting examples, and they even have a funny video of Xunantunich, and of course they don't quite get the pronunciation correct.

 

"There is a unique pocket in the world that buzzes with warmth, inner peace and joy.  The people are peaceful, with a quiet confidence emanating from their eyes.  They smile broadly, and are filled with energetic laughter, friendly gazes and cozy hugs.  Welcome to Belize...

 

So scrap your preconceived ideas of this petite little country, smushed between Guatemala, Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.  Although part of Central America, both geographically and politically, it refuses to be part of its neighbors to the left.  Rather, Belize celebrates a diverse culture; in fact, they're known as the Central American melting pot.'

 


Via Best of Cayo
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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Mayan Ancient Civilization | Scoop.it
BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war.

 

Belize has a much higher Human Development Index ranking that its Central American neighbors such as Guatemala.  That fact alone makes Belize a likely destination for migrants.  Given that Belize was 'British Honduras' during colonial times, English is (still) the official language, but that is changing as increasingly Spanish-speaking immigrants are changing the cultural profile of Belize.        


Via Seth Dixon, Dot MacKenzie
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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:18 PM

It's interesting to compare and contrast the reaction of Belize's English-speaking population to an influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants with that of the United States. I enjoyed reading that the welcoming of immigrants by the ruling political system has done much to lessen racial tensions, with the various ethnic groups scattered along the political spectrum. This contrasts sharping with the American political spectrum, where there is a clear racial divide between conservatives and liberals. Americans could learn a lot from Belize in this regard, although the transition has been far from smooth in the nation. Although Spanish is now taught in schools as a result of the reality of the immigration wave in the country, there is some push-back from English speaking groups. Many employees of service industries are losing their jobs to those who can offer bilingual services, as well as some other economic changes as a result of the influx of new immigrants. However, the degree of this tension is a lot lower there than it is in the United States. It will be interesting to see how this debate shapes up in the future; it could very well serve as a helpful model for American politicians.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:49 AM

You won't BELIZE this link.... get it.

I'm hilarious.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:48 PM

This country of Belize seems to be a very interesting place. I never knew that in Central America, there was a country who's official language is English. It is made up of a lot of retired British soldiers and North American "sun seekers." Migration into Belize comes from other place in Central America, of its 300,000 person population, 15% are foreign born. It is now becoming a very mixed country and Spanish is making a gain on English. Schools teach in English, but Spanish lessons are mandatory. A  population boom both helps and hurts the economy. Most migrants are of working age and are willing to work low wages in brutal conditions. A lot of Belizeans tell census that they are not working and with Spanish gaining ground, a lot of monopolistic people are losing jobs to those who are bilingual. Although there are frictions between ethnic groups, in general things are good and political party lines are not divided by ethnicity. 

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End of the World? The Story behind the Mayan Calendar | Travel Far ...

End of the World? The Story behind the Mayan Calendar | Travel Far ... | Mayan Ancient Civilization | Scoop.it
Among calendars developed on the basis of integer arithmetic, it is arguable that the Mayan calendar is perhaps the most complicated one that has ever existed. There are a myriad of ways, probably as many as seventeen, ...
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Maya Ruins in Belize: Visiting Lamanai

Maya Ruins in Belize: Visiting Lamanai | Mayan Ancient Civilization | Scoop.it
Belize is filled with ancient Maya ruins worth exploring. Lamanai, or submerged crocodile, is one of the largest and most interesting sites.

 

"...Nearly every travel magazine and media outlet has included Belize in their round up of “must visit” destinations for 2012, mainly because the end of the Maya calendar takes place on December 21. And the recent visit by Prince Harry certainly did wonders for putting Belize on even more travelers’ radars..."


Via BelizeNet.com
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Best Places to Visit in Belize

Best Places to Visit in Belize | Mayan Ancient Civilization | Scoop.it

While Belize has been on many lists lately, from Trip Advisor, to Lonely Planet, to Fodor's, this week, a couple of great articles about Belize were published.  The first, entitled Five Reasons to Love Belize, discusses the mysteriousness of Caves Branch and the wildlife at the Belize Zoo, and its Tropical Education Center.  http://www.wheretostay.com/blog/Five-Reasons-To-Love-Belize/277

 

The second, entitled Top Best Places to Visit in Belize, deserves the blatant redundancy in its title because Cayo is listed first.  Cayo's Larry Waight wrote the piece for the Huffington Post, and he gave a long list of prime destinations.

 

"San Ignacio Town is the main town in the Cayo District of western Belize and is an ideal base to explore ancient Maya cities like Caracol and Xunantunich, ceremonial caves like Barton Creek and Actun Tunichil Muknal, and cascading water falls like Rio on Pools and Big Rock waterfalls in the Mountain Pine Ridge Nature Reserve.  Hiking, kayaking, bird watching and horseback riding are also top rated outdoor activities in the area."


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'Climate Thanks to the Mayans for demonstrating that throwing living ...

'Climate Thanks to the Mayans for demonstrating that throwing living ... | Mayan Ancient Civilization | Scoop.it
'Climate Thanks to the Mayans for demonstrating that throwing living people into a well doesn't prevent drought'. Read the Full Article · 'Climate Thanks to the Aztecs for demonstrating that torturing children isn't a reliable way ...
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