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Learning Design Perspectives: SAM and ADDIE

Learning Design Perspectives:  SAM and ADDIE | Maximizing Business Value | Scoop.it

The author pointed says that no model (old or new) will prevent ‘boring, lifeless training.’   Can the [classic] ADDIE model be enhanced?  Absolutely. 

Excerpts:

The essential differences in these models, including what’s captured in Allen’s SAM process, is to make the model less linear and to include feedback loops within the process for regular look backs, particularly to the data from the analysis phase. 


The problem with these models, including SAM, is that they seem to require redundancy.  There are certainly instances when such redundancy is not necessary. 


... the ADDIE model was [not] designed to be a strictly linear process anyway...

[The author]  ...prefers this cyclic visualization of ADDIE to better show the interactions between the phases.

From the comments:  " Is SAM similar to Agile and ADDIE similar to Waterfall, as in software development?   

    

Related posts by Deb:
    

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

     

Agile Leader Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through Sharp Rocks

     

Co-Creation in Theory U: Leading from the Future as it Emerges & the Road to Commitment



Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 18, 2013 10:14 AM

This thoughtful article and  comments help in getting a perspective on any model past and present.  Commenter Karen offers that “pure Agile” approaches do not work for all projects.  She mentions  “AgileFall” as a combination of approaches.  

She also suggests that a combo of SAM and ADDIE will emerge, keeping ADDIE’s structure and proven methods while incorporating SAM’s iterative approach. ~  Deb

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What Learning will Look Like in the Future ~ Adaptative Tools and Tech #Infographic

What Learning will Look Like in the Future ~ Adaptative Tools and Tech #Infographic | Maximizing Business Value | Scoop.it

Knowledge Works has taken a look into the future of education and learning ecosystem and prepared for you this awesome graphic via Mindshift. 


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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, July 31, 2013 10:23 PM

amo a ideia de infografico para traduzir o colorido da aprendizagem futura...

Maria Persson's comment, August 4, 2013 4:03 PM
Muito bom!
Fields Jackson, Jr's comment, August 24, 2013 6:24 PM
Very nice
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Organizing and Curating Content on a Subject May Actually Be The Best Way To Learn It

Organizing and Curating Content on a Subject May Actually Be The Best Way To Learn It | Maximizing Business Value | Scoop.it

Robin Good: I think Sam Gliksman has a vital point here. 

 

The point is this: there is no better way to learn something than to research, organize and build a personal framework of information, facts, resources, tools and stories around it. 

 

And yes, if I do think about it, I can only confirm that my in my experience this has certainly been the case. 

 

Rather than learn by memorizing and going through a predetermined path that someone else has arbitrarily set for me (and thousands of others), by curating my own learning path and curriculum, I am forced to dive into discovery and sense-making for the very start, two essential ingredients for effective learning. 

 

The change is evident: from passive memorization of predetermined info, to personal exploration, discovery and sense-making of what I am interested in pursuing. 

 

With such an approach, the replacement of classic teachers with curators who can act as guides, coaches and wise advisors to my exploratory wanderings may be vital to the success of many learners. 

 

Curation can therefore be a revolutionary concept applicable both to learners and their approach as well as to the new "teachers" who need to become trusted guides in specific areas of interest.

 

Here's the text excerpt from this article, that sparked in me these ideas:

 

"Reliance on any type of course textbook – digital, multimedia, interactive or otherwise – only fits as a more marginal element in student-centered learning models.

 

It’s not the nature of the textbook as much as its reverence in the classroom as “the” singular authority for learning.

 

Lifelong learners need to be skilled in finding, filtering, collating, evaluating, collaborating, editing, analyzing and utilizing information from a multitude of sources.


Instead we could prioritize “content construction”. Textbooks are an important gateway - a starting point from which students can learn and then begin their exploration of information on any topic (although even on that point I feel we should encourage the “critical reading” of textbooks).

 

However the days when students could responsibly rely on any textbook as a singular information source are gone.

 

Also, the process of accessing, synthesizing and utilizing information is often as important as the product.

 

The skills developed are an essential component of education and life today.

 

We have access to an exponentially growing amount of information to process and apply [and] there are many excellent tools we can all use to help in constructing and organizing that content."

 

Insightful. Informative. 8/10

 

Full original article: http://ipadeducators.ning.com/profiles/blogs/supplementing-textbooks  ;


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Robin Good's comment, March 3, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you for being so kind. I am happy to see this resonates with your experience too.
janlgordon's comment, March 3, 2012 5:37 PM
This is another great piece and it certainly resonates with me, thanks for sharing this Robin.
Steven Verjans's curator insight, December 11, 2012 7:19 PM

Not to mention that it's the first step towards research as well.

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A Curated Search Engine of Learning Resources: Gooru


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Olga Boldina's comment, September 17, 2013 1:36 AM
Thank you Robin!
Robin Good's comment, September 17, 2013 3:08 AM
You are very welcome Olga.
ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 18, 2013 9:59 AM

Robin - Another great analysis.  Thanks for all of our hard work & curation. 

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What Learning will Look Like in the Future ~ Adaptative Tools and Tech #Infographic

What Learning will Look Like in the Future ~ Adaptative Tools and Tech #Infographic | Maximizing Business Value | Scoop.it

Knowledge Works has taken a look into the future of education and learning ecosystem and prepared for you this awesome graphic via Mindshift. 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, July 31, 2013 10:23 PM

amo a ideia de infografico para traduzir o colorido da aprendizagem futura...

Maria Persson's comment, August 4, 2013 4:03 PM
Muito bom!
Fields Jackson, Jr's comment, August 24, 2013 6:24 PM
Very nice
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Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White | Maximizing Business Value | Scoop.it

Robin Good: What does curation mean from an educational viewpoint? And what is the key difference between "collecting" and "curating".

Nancy White (@NancyW), a 21st Century Learning & Innovation Specialist and the author of Innovations in Education blog, has written an excellent article, dissecting the key characterizing traits of curation, as a valuable resource to create and share knowledge. 

 

She truly distills some key traits of curation in a way that is clear and comprehensible to anyone.

 

She writes: "The first thing I realized is that in order to have value-added benefits to curating information, the collector needs to move beyond just classifying the objects under a certain theme to deeper thinking through a) synthesis and b) evaluation of the collected items.

 

How are they connected?"

 

Excellent definition. 

 

And then she also frames perfectly the relevance of "context" for any meaningful curation project by writing: "I believe when we curate, organization moves beyond thematic to contextual – as we start to build knowledge and understanding with each new resource that we curate.

 

Themes have a common unifying element – but don’t necessarily explain the “why.”

 

Theme supports a central idea – Context allows the learner to determine why that idea (or in this case, resource) is important.

 

So, as collecting progresses into curating, context becomes essential to determine what to keep, and what to discard."

 

But there's a lot more insight distilled in this article as Nancy captures with elegance the difference between collecting for a personal interest and curating for a specific audience. 

 

She finally steals my full endorsement for this article by discretely inquirying how great a value it would be to allow students to "curate" the domains of interest they need to master.

 

Excellent. Highly recommended. 9/10

 

Full article: http://d20innovation.d20blogs.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation/ ;


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Beth Kanter's comment, July 8, 2012 1:22 PM
I especially like how she used the Bloom's Taxonomy and related that to curation.
Stalder Angèle's comment, August 1, 2012 3:56 AM
Thank you for this scoop!
Shaz J's comment, August 5, 2012 10:39 AM
Thanks for this!