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How journalists can find sources in social media database | Journalism.co.uk

How journalists can find sources in social media database | Journalism.co.uk | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it

Crimson Hexagon has amassed a library of over 250 billion posts from social media websites and believes the contents offer a wealth of sources for journalists, as well as commercial interests. The library, which is growing by 500 million posts a day, includes people's public comments from Twitter, Facebook, blogs, forums, online news sites and comments from Youtube as well as consumer review data from Amazon, Epinion and others which have been collected since 2008. More recently, the company has added data sources such as the Chinese micro blog site Sina Weibo. "We're collecting the news itself," Wayne St Amand, vice president of Crimson Hexagon, told Journalism.co.uk, "as well as certain comments related to those news stories online. So we're getting the professional journalists and the citizen journalists."...


Via Jeff Domansky
Matt Spaw's insight:

I may not necesarily be competing with social media. As a journalist, I can use it to my advantage! Because social media is already a loosely curated collection of information, it would serve me well as a source.

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Jeff Domansky's comment, March 5, 2013 3:17 AM
Can't wait to explore this tool....
Matt's Post High School Planning
My dream is to become a journalist. Unfortunately, that's not so easy at a time when social media is wiping out demand for the printed word.
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How journalists can find sources in social media database | Journalism.co.uk

How journalists can find sources in social media database | Journalism.co.uk | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it

Crimson Hexagon has amassed a library of over 250 billion posts from social media websites and believes the contents offer a wealth of sources for journalists, as well as commercial interests. The library, which is growing by 500 million posts a day, includes people's public comments from Twitter, Facebook, blogs, forums, online news sites and comments from Youtube as well as consumer review data from Amazon, Epinion and others which have been collected since 2008. More recently, the company has added data sources such as the Chinese micro blog site Sina Weibo. "We're collecting the news itself," Wayne St Amand, vice president of Crimson Hexagon, told Journalism.co.uk, "as well as certain comments related to those news stories online. So we're getting the professional journalists and the citizen journalists."...


Via Jeff Domansky
Matt Spaw's insight:

I may not necesarily be competing with social media. As a journalist, I can use it to my advantage! Because social media is already a loosely curated collection of information, it would serve me well as a source.

more...
Jeff Domansky's comment, March 5, 2013 3:17 AM
Can't wait to explore this tool....
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Can Creative Writing Be Taught?

Can Creative Writing Be Taught? | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it
My MFA program gave me thick skin and knocked me down a few notches, both of which I desperately needed.

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This would be an important question to ask if I'm planning on getting a degree in journalism

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Writing for Free Is Great

Writing for Free Is Great | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it
Nate Thayer, writing for free at his eponymous blog, has a post up detailing the way he received an offer to write something for free for the Atlantic and declined to do it.

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Has Data Journalism Reached A Tipping Point?

Has Data Journalism Reached A Tipping Point? | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it
At the recent NICAR Conference there was a stark difference from year's past; The place was packed. More than 600 journalists (from elite newsrooms, start-ups and community newspapers) showed up --...
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The State of Online Journalism Today: Controversial | Jane Friedman

The State of Online Journalism Today: Controversial | Jane Friedman | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it
A look inside the operations of a major online publication—The Atlantic—and the evolving standards of how content is assigned, sourced, and paid for.

 

The post consists of an e-mail exchange between Thayer and an Atlantic editor, where Thayer is asked if he would repurpose a previously published piece for the Atlantic’s website. He is not offered any money, but is told he will gain exposure since Atlantic’s site enjoys 13 million readers per month.

 

For those familiar with the online world of publication, this exchange is hardly surprising or unusual. If you scan the posts at Who Pays Writers, you’ll see that $0 or maybe $50–$100 is common for very well-known sites. In fact, the more traffic a website gets, the more it can avoid payment by offering the carrot of exposure—which is indeed valuable and needed for some writers, but not all.

Thayer, in response to the offer of pay through exposure, says:

 

"Frankly, I will refrain from being insulted and am perplexed how one can expect to try to retain quality professional services without compensating for them. Let me know if you have perhaps mispoken [sic]."...


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 5, 2013 11:15 PM

A good exploration of the issue of how much to pay freelancers.

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Stories I'd like to see: crafting 'A Bitter Pill' - Columbia Journalism Review (blog)

Stories I'd like to see: crafting 'A Bitter Pill' - Columbia Journalism Review (blog) | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it
Stories I'd like to see: crafting 'A Bitter Pill'
Columbia Journalism Review (blog)
In his “Stories I'd like to see” column, journalist and entrepreneur Steven Brill spotlights topics that, in his opinion, have received insufficient media attention.
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Why I Write for Free

Why I Write for Free | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it
Unless they're independently wealthy, I don't believe anyone should work for free. However, I will admit that I have written for free. And I continue to do so somewhat compulsively.
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How Twitter won the social media battle for journalism | The Wall Blog

How Twitter won the social media battle for journalism | The Wall Blog | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it

Polis, the journalism think-tank at the LSE, has published an in-depth report looking at the value of social media to journalism, specifically public service broadcasting, and it highlights how Twitter has come to dominate news.

As the report puts it, Twitter plays a more important role in newsgathering than Facebook, which is much more about discussion and far less about breaking news.

 

Lyse Doucet, the BBC’s Chief International Correspondent puts it this way: “There is no question, if you are not on Facebook and Twitter, you are not getting the full story”.

 

More telling is the comment from Joanna Carr, editor of BBC Radio 4′s news programme ‘PM’, who said she “wouldn’t hire anybody who doesn’t know how to use Twitter”....


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Tannah Gravelis's curator insight, August 22, 2014 4:55 AM

This piece demonstrates how traditional journalists have begun to understand the important role social media channels such as Twitter and Facebook can play in the field of Journalism, especially from a story curation stand-point. It is a strong case of how social media can help push journalism into the next phase of it life cycle. as Joanna Carr puts it, saying she “wouldn’t hire anybody who doesn’t know how to use Twitter”

rank = 6

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The problem with online freelance journalism - Reuters Blogs (blog)

The problem with online freelance journalism - Reuters Blogs (blog) | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it
Reuters Blogs (blog) The problem with online freelance journalism Reuters Blogs (blog) It's OK to ask people to do things for free, but it's not OK to oversell yourself in the process: when Khazan tells Thayer that “some journalists use our...
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Ev Williams: Medium Wants To Help Build A Sustainable Economic Model For Journalism | TechCrunch

Ev Williams: Medium Wants To Help Build A Sustainable Economic Model For Journalism | TechCrunch | Matt's Post High School Planning | Scoop.it

At the Launch Conference in San Francisco today, Twitter co-founder Ev Williams took the stage to talk to conference founder Jason Calacanis about everything from his experience at Twitter and the rise of Vine to sharing his take on Google and Facebook as well as the latest from Medium, his latest effort to shape the future of digital publishing. For those unfamiliar, a serial entrepreneur, Williams has played a key role in helping to shape the way we create and share content on the Web, as the co-founder of Pyra Labs, which produced Blogger — and was bought by Google in 2003. In doing so, Williams is often credited with coining the term “blogger” and helping to popularize both the term “blog” and the medium itself. After leaving Google, Williams went on to co-found Odeo and “idea incubator” Obvious, which produced both Twitter and, most recently, Medium (among others)....

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:52 PM

Interview with the always-impressive Ev Williams, co-founder of Twitter and Blogger.