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Mapping Rocky's Run

Mapping Rocky's Run | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"As a kid, I grew up watching the Rocky movies, shadow boxing with my brothers and doing push-ups during the workout montages.  One on my favorite scenes was in Rocky II when Rocky runs through the whole city of Philadelphia, thronged by adoring fans as he runs to the top of the stairs to the Philadelphia Museum of Art (and yes, of course I re-enacted that scene when I was there)."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

My family and I have watched the Rocky series a handful of times, and a month or two ago, my grandmother called our house all frantically to let us know that "Rocky" was on TV, in case we wanted to watch it.  I used to be big into going for long walks across a few towns every night, and this article reminded me of some of the walks that I had been on, and have actually mapped out.  The expression "walking around in circles" does not fully apply to many places, because they have semi-straight roads and often have 90 degree intersections with other roads, which would make it walking in rectangular patterns.  I have walked well over 20 miles in a single night, and found myself exploring side roads and looking them up later on an online map of the area.  In this article, Rocky runs in a "circular" pattern, but from his house to the final steps that he runs up at a museum, rather than returning to his house.  In this map with the article, Rocky is shown as covering a large area on his run, without overlapping the same areas all that often.  "Rocky" is a series about achieving dreams and defying odds- actions that are different with different characters and different outcomes in every movie.  It makes sense that Rocky covers a little bit of the same ground twice, metaphorically in the movies, and literally on the map, but also that he achieves his destination after going the long and difficult distance rather than a bee-line to the destination, that would defeat the depth of the story.  Rocky's run is symbolic as a journey mentally, physically, and spiritually, and is enforced by the route that he was found to have run, as analyzed by this article and its links.  While I found myself walking 15 miles to a place, and back in the same night, I was merely part of a cycle.  Rocky is a hero because he went the distance.

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Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 10:08 PM
Good http://www.skoyun.com
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:14 PM

I too loved this movie growing up. Everytime Rocky was brought up you always remebered the part when Rocky ran up the stairs to the statue after his long training run. Just from his run you see the type of community they lived in. His town was very rundown, but you still got a sense of community by the way people yelled and cheered for Rocky as he ran by. They may not have had much as a community, but they supported each other and took pride in their city. You were able to get all of this just from the different landmarks you saw Rocky pass by on his run. You may not think about it at the time, but the location and scenary really paints a picture of the type of lifestlye and culture Rocky grew up in, and what makes him the man that he is. That is all just from simply paying attention to the landmarks that he runs by. Location really effects a person and you can see that in this movie. Rocky was a fighter who never gave up. His community was the same way. And looking at the map I don't think I was would ever want to run that far. It appeared a lot shorter in the movie than it actually is!

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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
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This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now

This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
When Anum Hussain heard about the Boston Marathon bombing, she immediately panicked, worried that the culprits would be like her. The 22-year-old Muslim was in the offices of Hubspot, the Cambridge marketing-software company she works for.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

A Muslim friend of mine went through hell in high school, and was often called a terrorist.  People used to knock his books over in the hallways and took his religious cap from him.  They would talk behind his back, mock his holy garb, and blame him for events such as the bombing of the twin towers on 9/11/01, which was ridiculous because he was not even a teenager at the time that event happened.  He shall remain nameless for purposes of respect and privacy, but this allusion is in order to establish my opinion that if people had gotten to know more Muslims at a younger age, as I have in this case, they would not associate Muslims with terrorism in their first impressions with these people.  My friend is a kind, musically inclined, and peaceful artist, and I am open to believing that these qualities reflect more accurately what Muslims are about, at least to me, than the negative connotations of dangerous radicals within that religious sect.  It seems the media's portrayal of the truth is more important than the truth itself to many people, for it is weighted with shining gold credibility spoken through shiny white teeth on an HDTV screen in high resolution... not from upset protests by bearded, turban-clad Muslims, however innocent they may actually be. The Muslims that have wonderful qualities have been overshadowed not by the dangerous radicals, but by the extreme portrayals and labelings from the media.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:33 PM

Being from around the area and listening and watching the tv during the boston bombings all I really thought about was how the city and families were effected by the tragic event. However I never really thought about how it impacted muslim people in the area. For people to put a blame on all muslim people is not right. We are not all the same, which means not all muslims are the same. Some muslims have lived their whole lives in the US and for people to catogorize them all as terrorists isn't right. All people should be treated them same way. It is sad to read the article and think that some muslims in Boston walk around in fear of being beat up or killed just because of their culture. The bombings effected an entire city and muslim people people should be able to mourn with the rest of the city. They grew up there just like we did. So what makes them so different from me and you? Not all muslims are killers like the two boys from the bombings. It is really sad to me that they have to live their lives in fear everyday in a place that they call home, just because of their culture. No one deserves to live like that. I can't even imagine how difficult it is for muslim people in Boston. 

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:38 AM

Terrorism is a huge problem in our Country today. I'm not trying to racist saying this but I feel like they do it to themselves. Coming into our country and terrorizing our nation thats okay? Yes not every Muslim is a terrorist im not saying that but you never know if they are or not. Since 911 we cant trust anyone, and theres a reason for that. I understand that they should not have to feel any different then the average American but the past is what we all dwell on.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 10:19 AM

Some are saying that racism doesnt exist anymore but it does. Muslims still live in fear that they are being judged everyday because some Americans generalize Muslims with terrorism

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Street Art Project Maps Rap Lyric Shout Outs Around NYC

Street Art Project Maps Rap Lyric Shout Outs Around NYC | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
If a NYC location got a shout out in some rap lyrics, Jay Shells has probably made a sign out of them and placed it at that specific location for his amazing new project.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I just got back at two in the morning from a road trip with one of my cousins to see her sister in Maryland.  It was a fabulous time, and I'd like to point out that we did drive through New York, and caught some glimpses of NYC across the way.  My whole experience on the trip was illuminated by different forms of cultural exposure.  I rarely travel, and it was quite fascinating to see the different locations on the way.  One thing that I noticed was a large presence of graffiti, that completely varied in styles and colors in every city and every state.  It was as if these different people from different places all had different things to say.  The rap lyrics on signs are interesting as well, because these rap lines are not intended to be written on signs, contrasted from graffiti, which is meant to be seen publicly.  The culture in New York is one that includes art and appreciation of art, and these rap lyric signs are both catchy and artsy.  Poetry has long been a way to teach people to remember things- such as in nursery rhymes.  It seems to me that it would be sufficiently easier for a person to remember what avenue they are supposed to meet someone on, by quoting existing rap lyrics that are also present on signs in the area.  These aesthetic embellishments also demonstrate a striving towards a revival of a human blend of Platonic cultural ideas with the presenece of art and poetry in public, and the human imperfection that accompanies rap music with the stigma of sex, drugs, and violence. 

         One of the bad things about the trip was the traffic in New York, but if I had rap lyric signs to read, I really would not have been that bad off.  Some people like to read books or magazines while using the bathroom, and it is becoming increasingly clear that there must be a similar level of tolerance/inclination towards people wanting to read rap lyrics on signs in New York that indicate the areas referred to in song.  There really are very few problems with this, and I am often more offended by the billboards in cities that tell me what religious ideas are right for me to believe, such as the Christ-Supremacist group billboards that tell me Jesus will save me.  I think Kanye West is a slightly more contemporary savior that might be to the liking of the citizens of New York City... At least, in this particular place, during this particular time.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:51 PM

Street art has a subtle, but powerful connection with place.  How does an art installation alter a neighborhood's sense of place?  How does a place alter the meaning(s) of an art installation?


Tags: art, mapping, NYC, culture, landscape, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

bancoideas's curator insight, April 24, 2013 7:59 AM

¿que tal esta idea de arte callejero? Letras de rap y señaléticas de tránsito

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Gesualdo: Glorious music and grisly murder

Gesualdo: Glorious music and grisly murder | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
He murdered his wife and was tried for witchcraft. But it is for glorious music, not grisly crimes, that we should remember Gesualdo, says Clemency Burton-Hill.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I am a huge fan of A Clockwork Orange.  I have seen the film many times, and read the book once, but do not remember the book at all.  I wanted to point out that in the film, the classical music that is in the background of some of the more disturbingly "ultraviolent" scenes of rape and destruction to have visited television screens, adds some sick and perverse hilarity to these gut-wrenching activities. In this film, Alex DeLarge is portrayed as extreme and crimminally unstable, but the music makes it seem like he's engaging in boy-like group activities.  The connection to this article is that Gesualdo is a brilliant classical musician who got pushed over the edge into committing a grizzly murder.  His music was pure, but his temper was mighty!  Stepping back from the conventionally thought of rules of society and existence, look at this reality of linear time.  All this, allegedly from the Big Bang, time is still in motion, matter is fractalizing into life as the universe reverberates on frequencies to dictate such violence, deception, and destruction, conflicts which are still present today!  All this horror and deep dark emotional confliction, is affiliated with classical music, a form of entertainment that has been set to Bugs Bunny cartoons, all are in the timeline of the Big Bang, and the realm of its possibilities.  These conflicts and classical entertainment are still connected to each other, a cited 400 years apart!  It really is black comedy, irony, and predestination.

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