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Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Jamaica Focuses on Farming

Jamaica Focuses on Farming | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"The country has taken on a bold new strategy in the face of expensive food imports: make farming patriotic and ubiquitous."

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have discussed Jamaica with some former classmates of mine, and they informed me that a lot of people are really poor there.  They said that the people there were very friendly, and hooked my friends up with some outstanding agricultural products at a really good price, but these people are very poor.  I think that because Jamaica was involved in the slave trade, and they didn't really as much of have slaves to do work like the US, but Jamaica was still involved in the slave trade, which ensured the presence of slaves.  While the US was building as a country, Jamaica was not thriving as much.  I think that the agriculture in Jamaica is (by what my friends say) fabulous as far as illegal crops go, but the agriculture FOR the Jamaicans (such as food) is lacking.  I read in the article that a European Development Agency sent money to Jamaica to help them be able to build chicken coops... So the chickens are enslaved too, and doomed to lay eggs or become a Sunday dinner.  That is kind of sad.  In all truth, I enjoy the taste of meat, but look forward to when meat and plants will be synthesized with no living tissue involved, because, after all, plants are alive too.  There are so many things that people have taken from the Earth, without giving anything back.  We are approaching the era where people should be more concerned with the environment, and what they can do for the Earth.  I think Jamaica should be given new technology that serves synthetic meat and synthetic vegetables, as a way to aid their agricultural and economic situation, rather than money for chicken coops from some pompous European cults.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 25, 2013 11:35 PM

After the British took control of Jamaica from the Spanish, it became one of the largest sugar exporting colony of the new world.  It also had one of the largest slave populations to support that sugar plantation industry.  Sugar crops destroy the soil which makes it harder to grow other crops.  i also think that had alot to do with Jamaica having to always import alot of its foodstuffs.  Now that the sugar planting, through technology, is not as destructive and the fact that it isnt as intensvie as it use to be, the soil has recovered in some sense allowing for different crops to be grown.  This will in turn can lead to a more stable economy in the area as a large part of the country's GDP will not have to go to buying imported food as they will now be able to provide their own foodstuffs.  Moving form a one crop, especially a cash crop, to multiple different crops will just better the outlook of this country's growth.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 2014 1:53 PM

The article describes how Jamaica and a couple other Caribbean nations are beginning to focus more on food crops than cash crops. Being dependent on imports for food can be disastrous for these islands when a global food shortage makes prices skyrocket. Being food independent will likely allow Jamaica to increase its net agricultural gains so long as the production and demand for its cash crops of bananas and sugarcane remain high.


Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 12:56 PM

Understanding how other countries survive their everyday lives is an important part of being a civil human being. As shown in one of the clips, a boy is putting on a tie before school and is on his way to eat breakfast. Not only does he have to eat breakfast at home, but he also is eating a stew that he picked the crops for. I could never imagine picking my own food in order to survive life. This scoop is enlightening in many ways.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have tried Quinoa, and thought that it was satisfactory, but I do not feel that it is worth importing to the US, given the negative effects that were mentioned in the article, such as harm to the poor, and malnutritioning the natives of Bolivia.  While it might be making money for the Bolivians (well, some of them), it is something that is damaging the soil as well... As the Bolivians plant and harvest this crop for purposes of exporting, the over-abundance of their agricultural efforts is harming the land, making it less fertile for people to grow Quinoa and other crops in.  I can see why the immediate desire to produce this crop arises, and it is logical, because little else will thrive in the Bolivian environment, but after examining the lasting impact, I would have to say that it reminds me of consumption of fossil fuels as a primary energy resource in first world countries today.  Using something that will only be available for a short time, and something that harms the environment and Earth, does not seem like something that we humans should get involved in, especially in such a day and age where the ignorance card cannot be played, and other excuses for us to continue with bad habits are dwindling away.  I look forward to the colonization of other worlds, but hope that by then we have perfected our methods instead of harming the environment in capitalistic rat races.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 9, 5:51 PM

This article was short so I clicked on the link that directed me to an Al Jazeera article, which went more in depth in this issue. My scoop reflects information gained from both articles. 

It is nice to see the world taking notice of such a nutritionally rich grain, that being quinoa. The world has many poor regions that in turn produce malnourished people, the production of quinoa on a global scale seems to benefit many. Yet, on a local more personal level there are people suffering from the demand/price boom. 

Local Bolivian residents, mostly surrounding the quinoa production regions (Andes) are suffering from the rising price of Quinoa. I find this to be outrageous. Regions can provide enough quinoa for the world yet overlook the sales of residents, whom have been valuing quinoa for generations upon generations. Now there are many whom cant afford it. 

The mass consumption of quinoa has now created mass production of the crop. This in turn is affecting the Nitrogen level of soil in certain regions, creating rifts amongst landowners (land owned due to native beliefs), and neglect of certain business men in regards to there native lands. The industry is changing the landscape and affecting the culture of rural regions as a whole. 

In response to the increased malnourishment of Bolivian citizens throughout the nation the government has issued a law declaring the children and pregnant woman being issued quinoa on a regular basis. This in turn provides nourishment these people need on a daily schedule. This is good progress however it doesn't pertain to the nation as a whole and also it only benefits the people receiving the quinoa for a period of time (end of pregnancy, older age/no longer a child). If Boliva wants to take part in global distribution of this crop it needs to tend to its own borders and secure a stable environment amongst its population. Its producing a product that battles malnourishment, no need for an immense population of people being malnourished throughout the general area. Very ironic. 


Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

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Population density - Country Comparison

Population density - Country Comparison | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
List of countries ranked by Population density.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Popular areas are populated... I had to say that! There must be reasons for all these populating these areas! And other reasons preventing much populating of other areas!  It relieved me to see that the USA was not very populated compared to other countries; I think it leaves much 'room' for improvement!  I know from visiting a few states that there are a lot of forests that take up a lot of space, all over the US.  I hope that whatever happens, we can keep the right amount of forests as a proper ratio to the population, positioned based on population densities, to provide oxygen/CO2 exchange as optimally as we can. I was fortunate enough to have grown up in the 'sticks' and I love the air quality in the woods SO much more than densely populated cities..

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Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves?

Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves? | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
What is more likely to happen first: Greece will leave the eurozone, or Scotland will leave the UK?


Although there is currently only about 30% of Scotland that would support independence, this is something that will be gaining importance.  The United Kingdom is a complex political entity, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland connected with England.  The "divorce referendum" will be help on October 2014 to see if Scotland wishes to dissolve this union and many of the political and economic events throughout Europe will be seen through this prism, especially the Euro Zone crisis in southern European countries (e.g.-Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal).  The possibility that this might happen are small, but as the article stated, "not zero." 


Tags: devolution, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Good for Scotland... as anyone that has watched Braveheart knows, all they need is Mel Gibson to fight for their independence, and they will surely win!  I know some people that play the bagpies, and I like the Scottish music better than much English music.  I don't know much about the UK, so I have little to guide me in favor or against Scotland declaring independence, but aw heck, why not...  The US declared independence, and it seemed to work out for them until... whenever...? forever? it depends on what you use as criteria to look at it...  But live and let live, let people do what they want, the only advice to that is not to let people harm others.  That way, true peace can be achieved.  Harmony, instead of harm.  So I would advocate for Scotland to wear women's clothing with turtle shells in their crotches and dance to celebrate their independence if that's what they want, as long as there are no epic battle sequences that precede or follow their dancing.  Don't be an elitist, open your eyes, the governments own your brothers and their lives... We must work to change this.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:42 PM

I had the pleasure of actually meeting a couple from Scotland who was in favor of Scotland's independence. I asked them what they thought would happen to their relationship with England and the rest of the European union.  The woman told me that they were uncertain of what would happen exactly but it would still be worth the shot, that she was willing to risk it to just be Scotland, and the UK because she identified with Scotland.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:10 AM

Im old enough to remember this conflict when Thatcher sent the British to retake the islands.  Both sides are claiming the islands for themselves.  Seems they were uninhabited when discovered by the French and then it was British, Spanish, French, Argentinan, and British again in 1833 until the militray invasion by Agrentina in 1982 and the retaking of the island by the British that same year.  Claims on both sides seem legitimate, but I find it most telling that the people now living there want to be part of Great Britian, not Argentina.  The people of mainland Argentina might want the islands, economic reasons and for the EEZ, but the people actully living on the island do not.  Another thing I do remember, the US was not with Great Britian at thie time in an unusual split between long term and stanuch allies

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 19, 12:59 PM

Often times, the thoughts of the Days of Empire are long gone. Most people see World War I as the boiling over of competition for colonies. As Europe gave most of their colonies up in the mid-20th century, some of them still stayed in their colonists' hands. The Falklands are that shining example of the UK's Empire days and it's understandable why they would want to hold on to them. Not only are they a decent naval base for operations in the Americas and along the Atlantic, they remind Great Britain that she was (and one could argue still is) a world power on the sea and land. No country wants to give away land voluntarily. Argentina sees these islands as her's and wants them back while the United Kingdom still holds claim. The UK also has the backing of the inhabitants when a referendum was held. Only three of the residents on the Falklands voted to split from its over seas ruler. What do you do when a country right off your shores demands your home back while a country thousands of miles away wants to keep you? It was a recipe for disaster in the 80's and still proves to be a point of tension in the 21st century.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 8:10 AM

The controversy of the Falklands continues. You would think that someone would have proposed viable solution to this issue by now. The Falklands war back in the 1980's remains one of my favorite skirmishes in history. The whole issue is throwback to the colonial era when the sun never set on the British Empire. In the years following the Second World War, the Empire collapsed. Today there is virtually nothing left of that once great empire. Great Britain should let one of its last vestiges of Empire go. There is no need for the British government to administer an Island in South America. The days of imperialism and colonialism have long since passed.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?


This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   


Tags: regions, USA.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Hundreds Head To Times Square To Protest Military Strike In Syria - CBS New York

Hundreds Head To Times Square To Protest Military Strike In Syria - CBS New York | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
Hundreds of protesters gathered in Times Square Saturday before marching to Union Square, protesting President Barack Obama’s proposed military strike on Syria.

Via Jacqueline Landry
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

A culture that is governed by an individual, is understandable because of a commonality.  An entire state (USA) made of many nations and cultures, governed by an individual that does not share commonalities with many of them, is preposterous.  I did not vote for Barack Obama, and I do not particularly think that a president who used cocaine and marijuana, and has not legalized these things within all areas of his governing as an immediate action upon entering office, is anyone that is worth calling "president."  I have friends that have been persecuted for possession of these substances, and I think it is nothing short of heinous that their nonviolent crimes are persecuted at all, while one lucky user of these substances gets into the office of the most powerful nation without a warning citation.  I also think it's perverse that the most powerful leader of the most powerful nation would do anything violent, or in other countries at all.  Violence is perverse, but who could bully someone who has all the nukes that the USA has? Who could reprimand him and actually get somewhere with that?  We don't belong in other countries, and I don't think we even belong in this one.  I'm glad these protestors protested against Obama, because I would hate to be on the receiving end of some sort of foreign ass-kicking against the USA in an act of retribution for what he might do to them...

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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | Matt's Geography Portfolio |


Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.

Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  


Tags: perspective, culture, gender,  popular culture.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:42 AM
We live in a world where this shouldn't even be an issue right? Aren't woman supposed to be equal, earn equal wages, equal respect, 'anything you can do, I can do better' kind of thing? So, why do subliminal and not so subliminal messages like these still exist? You find this type of thing ALL over the world but here in America, we focus on it more. We were once a leading nation on the topic of women equality so as a leader who is trying to set examples for the rest of the world, how can we find this stuff still appropriate?
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society’s culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

Michele Baker's curator insight, March 12, 2014 11:39 AM

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:14 PM

Yesterday at the ESRI User Conference, the Urban Observatory was unveiled.  The physical display contained images from cities around the world to compare and contrast diverse urban environments.  The online version of this was announced during in a 10 minute talk by Jack Dangermond and Hugh Keegan.  This interactive mapping platform let's users access 'big data' and have it rendered in thematic maps.  These maps cover population patterns, transportation networks, and weather systems.  This is a must see.  Read Forbes' article on the release of Urban Observatory here.

Tags: transportation, urban, GIS, geospatial, ESRI.

Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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Population Density

Population Density | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Martin's AP Human Geography » Folk and Popular Music: Origins and Diffusion

Martin's AP Human Geography » Folk and Popular Music: Origins and Diffusion | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
How does Human Geography explain the world we live in?
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

One genre of many that I plan to research for my Research Paper on Cultural diffusion of music in the world

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Population growth seems to be a trend that we see happening now as sharply increasing, but it is supposed to level out.  I doubt that this will happen.  Realistically, there are correllations between colonizations of other countries and population growths.  We are at a time when people are signing up to start colonies on Mars, and inevitably, other worlds.  Compared to the tiny confines of Earth, the large universe waits for us with open arms and trillions (potentially even infinite times) the quantities of living space.  Perhaps the leap in population comes at a time when we will be colonizing other worlds.  If Earth in the now can hold 7 billion people, and it is expected to level out under double that, that means another Earth-sized plane would be able to hold the same number as Earth, assuming all needs can be met (food, water, etc).  Earth is becoming one of the homeworlds of one of the dreaded species seen in movies, like Aliens, that spreads like an infection.  The multiplying on the homeworld has been seen as abundant, but speculation of the future is even more scary.  I would guess that DNA modification would take place in the relatively near future to protect colonists from the wrath of raw space and mishaps that may befall them on the colonies, as well as eliminate a few of the needs of humans- oxygen, food, water- to make the available living space more suitable for them.  Look at it like a bucket of rainwater filling up in the rain- at full capacity, there is no other option if the rain keeps falling; it begins to overflow.  My speculation is based on where there is available land for colonizing, and it seems that we humans might move to nearby, and eventually, more distant worlds, instead of trying to overpopulate Earth.

Nolan Walters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:14 AM

Why is the population growing so quickly? Most of the population is located in Southeast Asia, and they are already starting to have problems.  What will happen once the ratio of people to resources changes, so that there are less resources than needed?  Overpopulation may just happen soon, but the Stage 2 countries are who are making our population grow so quickly.

Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

In reference to globalization, the origins of mythology and ideas of "super-heros" go back thousands of years to ancient mythology.  Often, these ancient gods or heros had something in common with their audiences, to identify with, as well as an exceptional skill that surpassed that of any human capability.  This Burka Avenger trailer shows that the Avenger fights evil in a superior way- by using books.  The commonality with Muslim audiences is depicted as wearing similar religious clothing, but also realizing that having that ability to battle with books is something both the superhero has, AND the general population.  This allows for identifying between the population and the hero in a way that shows they can be heros too.  Superman did something similar by "doing the right thing," and Batman too, by standing up to injustice at whatever level his opportunities permitted.  Showing a down-to-earth hero with powers and commonalities with the Muslim audience is a way of the artists of their society saying that these kids can be heroes too.  It plays down the extremes of actual violence, and replaces that with intellectual solutions and peaceful defending of the right thing to do. The blend of conventional heroic traits and the Pakistani culture is what makes this cartoon a statement for social change, and also what might keep them away from harmful activities by them being exposed to it at a young age.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 4:25 PM

A modern day Batman/Superman, Burka Avenger, with great graphics and an in-depth plot. The television shows the Pakistanis children watch are the same type of shows that I watched growing up, and the shows that the modern day children of today’s youth are watching. The cross-cultural relationship seems so different, but at the roots it is the same. The kids in this show have friends, pets, enemies, a hero, a conflict; everything that an American television show would feature.  Whether the kids are facing a bully, a school closure from a villain, or a life peril from another villain, there undercover school teacher is there ready and willing to save the day. Everybody needs a hero to look up to, so this show is great for the Pakistani youth. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 10:06 AM

I think this is wonderful.  It also reemphasizes the reality that all children are born without preconceived notions of what is right, what is wrong, what is good, or what is evil.  An American child might look at this and automatically think that the lady in the Burka is a "villain", due to American media and propaganda.  I can't help but think of the backlash that would surround this cartoon if they ever tried to put it on American airwaves.  

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, however, the pumpkin is nearly exclusively considered a food crop or animal feed."

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have been a long-time fan of pumpkin coffee, and tomorrow I will probably have some with my cousins and family... Some areas of Asia allow consumption of dogs, other areas of the US allow consumption of roadkill, and that is different from what most people in RI are used to... So I guess, it's not really my business what other people and countries do with their pumpkin crops, as long as it doesn't negatively affect other people.  My neighbor has won some prizes, I think 3rd place in RI for largest pumpkin contests, which is pretty cool, because for several months, you can see their pumpkin garden from my backyard.  Those pumpkins are enormous, and made me wonder if there was anything being done to make the modified pumpkins more usable in food.  I know GMOs are a touchy issue, but to feed the starving people around the world, you have to wonder if one pumpkin at 2000 lbs could feed a village of people.  Lots of people that don't like GMOs probably do unhealthy things in other ways, so their huge activism movements really boggle me.  Labeling GMOs is one thing, but stopping genetic modifications seems as controversial as starting them, especially when some people can benefit from them.  Whatever, I guess pumpkins are cool for whatever people want to do with them, including smashing them... this week on RIC's campus I saw a smashed pumpkin.  The only thing that really popped into my head was not "what a waste," or "oh, those delinquents," but rather "that seems fun."  I did assume though, that no one was hurt by the smashing of the pumpkin...

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:02 AM

Every year it is expected around halloween that my family and friends will carve pumpkins. Then around chrstmas time it is expected that we will get our christmas tree to decorate. This is something lots of people do around this time. However what I never really linked together was that I was thinking about the geography of things by doing this. I know it is part of our culture and most people do it because it was a tradition. However what I never really thought about was where these pumpkins or christmas trees actually came from. There is a process that farmers have to go through to produce pumkins and pine trees, a process we probably don't even think about because we are so used to having these things around the holidays. When we think of pumpkins we thing of Jack-o-laters and pumkin pies, but to some people pumpkins are considered a crop and food source. We may not see it that way because our culture uses them around Halloween and for processed canned pumpkin for cooking. However not all cultures are like that, which is interesting to think about. Something that is considered seasonal in our culture might be an everyday crop for another culture. It is interesting to see how different places in the wolrd use such things as pumpkin so much different that we do in our culture.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:14 PM

Although you wouldn't think it there are many different countries and specific regions that demonstrate the perfect cropping land and fertilization process to grow pumpkins. Out of the US power house pumpkin growing Illinois is named number 1. Along side California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvainnia, Mississippi. But lets travel abroad to Africa, now me personally I wouldnt think that there are alot of pumpkin patches in Africa but there are many different places in Africa that pumpkins are grown. SOme of these places are Egypt with (690,000) and then there is South Africa with (378,776). I found these numbers quite interesting because one wouldn't think that there are pumpkin patches in Africa.

Pamela Shields's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:10 AM

@Danyl †  so inspirational!

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Economic sustainability pertains to the notion of an economy or function of that economy being able to last not just for a short period of time, but for a long time.  In this a article, there is great smog about the air, and it shows that in the case of Hong Kong, ships are a large source of pollution.  Hong Kong is a port, and its economic purpose involves many ships docking and traveling in the area, but the emissions from the ships clearly causes a negative impact on the environment.  Yes, one or two ships, once a year might not cause such damage to the air quality, but what they have now means that the ships not only are great in numbers and frequency but also that they will keep on coming!  The Hong Kong economy revolves around using Hong Kong as a port, but if this pattern of pernicious decay has continued to the point where the damage is now obvious, and is set to continue for the foreseeable future, it will likely become uninhabitable.  It might be time for development of cleaner fuel methods, if the people of Hong Kong plan to keep using their aera as a port, but sooner or later they are going to have to find a new location.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 11:55 AM

This article is a little sad. If you're traveling across the world and want to take pictures for memories, using a backdrop would not be the first thing that comes to mind. Tourists use a backdrop to show the Hong Kong skyline on a clear and sunny day because you have trouble seeing it most days due to all of the pollution. It's crazy that you cannot even take a picture of the actual skyline because the pollution is so bad. This temporary fix has overlooked that actual problem here. People are fascinated that they are being provided with an alternative of what it would look like but something should be done so that people can actually experience the real thing. This backdrop is putting a band-aid on the issue in the mean time but all of this pollution is not safe and something needs to be done to start fixing it. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 12:08 PM

Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.


This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   


Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Don Brown Jr's comment, November 5, 2012 1:22 PM
Military conflict is often at times overlooked at as a source of language diffusion however the information displayed in this article can help explain how English has become one of the most popular languages in the world today.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.


The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.


Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Scooped by Matthew DiLuglio!

Bill may restore death benefits for fallen soldier families

Bill may restore death benefits for fallen soldier families | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
Legislation may change the shutdowns effect on death gratuity.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Two views come to mind about taxpayers funding military burial expenses- One, that it should never have come into the event of being denied by the government, and Two, that it should never come out of the people (citizens at large of the US of A)'s pockets.  Would you pay for Charlie Manson's funeral? Why not...? soldiers are murderers too! it's okay...  but I didn't ask them to go over there and kill people in other countries.  I know some soldiers, and I REALLY do respect them, enough to put that in perspective.  I support our soldiers, and I support murder, if that's what our soldiers do over there.  My grandfather was in the Navy, and it was an honor to have the representatives from the military at his funeral.  But soldiers break one of the ten commandments, if that sort of law system is what you might be familiar with.  They kill.  I think freeze rays would be optimal, because instead of killing, you could freeze and stop the 'bad guys,' but I guess I'm ahead of these times... As for number one, aformentioned... The government organizes and trains these soldiers, so hey government... pay for them!  And number two, ask for donations, because there are many antiviolent people that didn't ask for your GI to die in Iraq.  I do mean that with whatever large quantity of respect I can muster, but need to show it harshly to get people to think outside of their ordinary context... Forgive me!

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.


Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

melissa stjean's comment, September 20, 2012 1:54 AM
Thousands of women each year sun bathe topless around the world.. Do we make a major scandal about those women? No. But when Kate Middleton does it, its a recipe for disaster. How is it different from a woman nursing her child in public? Well, Kate was sabotaged by paparazzi on their private honeymoon while women openly chose to nurse in the public.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 10:11 AM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 30, 2012 8:07 PM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
MOUNT GERIZIM, West Bank (AP) — The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I know a man who is Indian, and his grandparents came from India.  He tells me that their people do not formally or very much at all approve of interbreeding between their people and other cultures.  He says Indians stick with Indians, and that's how it's supposed to be.  I think in the future that the genetic diseases will be abolished by selective characteristic modification through reproductive alteration using technology- I think DNA modification will become a popular trick in both reproduction and everyday life that will allow for the end of illness.  This would allow people to marry into other cultures without fear of genetic complications, but they would still have that cultural barrier my Indian acquaintence referred to.  That same dude has some funny insight about Italians and other cultures, and noted that Italian-Americans are not really Italian at all.  We had a couple of interesting discussions regarding different cultures, and he told me that he is 100% Indian.  I don't mean to seem degrading AT ALL but the first thing that popped into my head was how people breed dogs to be purebreds, which are coveted and expensive, as well as pure.  I'm a blend of many different nationalities, and I'm proud of it... The universe is a blend of many nationalities, and I ever-ponder my connection with the Universe, and it's nice to know that I have a commonality with the Universe!

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 2014 12:00 PM

It's a very interesting and sad phenomenon when groups that thrived in the past begin to dwindle to a point where the acts of individuals can decide the entire future of the demographic. It brings in questions of tradition and if those people have a duty to propagate their genes to keep their group alive. I can only imagine how tense the environment could be when single accidents or deaths could mean the end of your people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 12:14 PM

This article describes a how the small religious group, the Samaritans, have seen their numbers shrink to unsustainable levels and have been forced to turn outside to find wives. These men are importing brides from places like Ukraine because of a significant gender imbalance and heightened risk of birth defects due to genetic homogenization over the centuries. These circumstances present an fairly unique case of migration, one which should it become a standard practice, could have an effect on the culture of the Samaritan communities.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:43 PM

The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture. Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community that has been plagued by genetic diseases caused by generations of intermarriage. Husni Cohen, a 69-year-old village elder, said the marriages are not ideal, since there is always a risk that the newcomers may decide to leave. But in a community whose population has fallen to roughly 360 people, he saw little choice.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).


Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I never really understood the idea of telling people to or forcing them to act certain ways.  Our lives are not 'ours;' they belong to the world around us, within us and without us, not us.  I think that the girls being allowed to do certain things, like sports, is a good thing, not great.  Sports, in my opinion, are not the essence of life.  I believe in pursuing spirituality, and I think it is good that the girls are allowed to play sports in accordance with Islamic law, but in this ever-changing world that we live in, my own non-extending personal thoughts are that any law from a religion, should encourage opportunities, not prevent or encroach on them.  Cultures are different, and I'm not even really about to suggest my thoughts to anybody that might take it harshly, but it seems to me that whatever cultural laws and traits that inhibit functions such as sports, or have done so, are being put there by someone else that clearly is not as negatively affected by the 'laws.'  I know police that have smoked marijuana, I know politicians that have broken the law, and I see these things as "Eh, whatever," because it doesn't really affect me.  I wonder who, even in accordance to the cosmic beliefs of Islam (I'm open to a deity as an answer), put these laws here that have restricted school sports...

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Women in Saudi Arabia are usually restricted to life in the house and cannot be unaccompanied in public, but allowing Saudi women to play sports is a leap into the future of women's rights in the Middle Eastern country. The women shown in the picture above are seen in traditional dress while training, showing the governments enforcement of rules in this historic move into the future.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 4:24 PM

I was happy to see an article like this. It's about time that these women are being given equal opportunities. Although they have a long way to go this is a step in the right direction. Saudi Arabian girls are being allowed to have sport related activities within their private schools. This did surprise me a little just because Saudi women's rights are very limited but this is a simple improvement just to the general health and well being of these girls. Two females competed in the last years summer Olympics representing Saudi Arabia and their efforts were not shown on Saudi TV. These women competing has opened a few doors to allowing more than just men to engage in these activities. Usually sports were only for the elite women who could afford gym memberships or attend well known colleges. Even though women cannot compete internationally or sign up for clubs or leagues this is a step in the right direction.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 4:47 PM

This is an interesting article about slowly allowing women in Saudi Arabia to participate in sports. While playing soccer or swimming or running may not seem so important to us in the West, it is a big deal for Saudi women. Saudi Arabia has some of the strictest laws in the Middle East regarding women's rights, and so even a very partial and gradual allowance for women to engage in sports is a big step. It shows perhaps a slight softening of adherence to Shariah law, which would hopefully eventually allow women more freedom in the realms of education and work, as well as in everyday life. 


Too often are people quick to judge and characterize other cultures or religions by the most extreme examples. While it is true that laws in Saudi Arabia are extremely restrictive to women, progress such as this, though small, may well act as a stepping stone for increased freedoms for women. People outside of Saudi Arabia and Islamic culture must realize that this kind of progress does happen and is, in fact, happening right now. To simply dismiss Saudi culture as misogynistic and oppressive is to write the whole culture off. While progress is slow and less than ideal, we should look to Saudi Arabia's Islamic neighbors and see that many of them are not so oppressive to women. Allowing Saudi women to participate in sports, therefore, may be setting up the country to increase women's rights and join its relatively more liberal neighbors. This is certainly a sign of positive change, and one that should not be ignored. 

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Georgraphy World News!

Local Life Expectancies

Local Life Expectancies | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:

Via Seth Dixon, Courtney Burns
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 11:30 AM
I wonder what the link between male longevity and Iowa males is? Perhaps the connection the land -physical work and local food.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

The presence of large numbers of people that speak languages other than English at home occurs on the east and west coasts of the U.S., but largely in the south and western areas of the U.S..  In high school we used to have discussions about how there were many immigrants coming into the U.S. from or through Mexico.  With migration comes cultural diffusion, as the people coming into the United States bring their language and many other cultural elements of their country of origin with them.  I know there are certain neighborhoods in cities in Rhode Island where most people that I see on the street are speaking Spanish.  I have a relative that has married an immigrant from Guatemala, and she learned that the North East coast of the U.S. Is where many people from Central America move to- often in groups that settle as communities to help each other.  I can understand that it is essential to live near people that speak your language, and it makes sense that their strength and comfort in numbers is also a way of having a "home away from home."  Being the area of the world on the southern land border of the U.S., and that Central America consists mainly of Spanish speakers, it fills in the Southern areas of the U.S. with people that speak a language other than English.  The coasts overall can be explained as being populated by people that speak languages other than English at home because they contain ports of travel and trade, and are points where many flights from other countries would land and drop off travelers and migrants.  That and beautiful ocean views make the coasts a great place for foreigners to settle and live.  These pull factors are likely influential reasons for people to relocate to the areas on the map.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Justin's Geographical Thingy!

Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Matt's Geography Portfolio |

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 


Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see:

Via Seth Dixon, Justin Cardoso
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

The famous city in Italy is sinking, and quickly.  It seems that the transient opportunities of a transient town are like that of other areas exposed to natural inclemence- such as New Orleans, and earthquake zones.  Sooner or later, places that are exposed to disaster will become inhabitable, and possibly abandoned.  When I hear of this city sinking, it makes me think of the Titanic, and how people should likely jump ship out of this situation, before the whole city 'goes under.'  I also think of marshy areas that would not be well-suited for development and inhabitance, and it seems that there is a history in the town that united people to live there in spite of the abundance of water.  Some of my ancestors were from Italy, and I wouldn't want harm to come to their homeland, but it really makes me wonder why they chose such a place to live...  It seems likely to me that the mere fact that it was sinking was not really considered much back then;  they were not as realistically concerned about the longevity of the city in the long run, than they were about the 'now' and the time at hand.  This reflects many facets of humanity and the hedonistic lifestyles that accompany many humans.  Humans that live for today and forget about tomorrow are doomed to live a life of sorry.  Humans that live for tomorrow and not today are out of touch and fail to seize the day.  Humans that live for today but remember tomorrow are the masons that build stairways to new lands for their descendents, and along with that, myriad new possibilities for positive opportunities.  I think some of the wisdom of Italy was put into its architecture and structural design, so that we might remember- we are dying in this life, just as Venice sinks, but we should live life as best as we can, and pave the way for future generations.  Like so, the dumping of wastes into the ocean seems tiny at first, but accumulates over many generations and will leave many ocean species dead, and harm the overall functionality of the Earth as a whole.  Let Venice be a reminder.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 6:58 PM

As you mentioned in class, we are living on constantly moving land features. In the case of Venice, the water is moving in on the city so it is actually sinking and has been for quite some time. What is new to the equation is that it might be sinking “five times more than” originally “calculated or “7.8 inches every hundred years.” I say might be because there are others who quibble about this new find, saying it is inaccurate. Also, there is a damn project in the works to try and combat the sinking. While I am happy that the city is working on slowing the process, I am curious to know what their solution is going to be when the city finally does go under. As I was reading this all I could think of was saving all the rich art and history that this Italian city is famous for. In some ways it is great that the city knows ahead of time that it is sinking because they have time to plan a way to save the important aspects of the city. On another hand though, the city is so below sea level that a natural disaster could cause far more damage than anyone could have foreseen. I just hope that doesn’t happen anytime soon because Venice is definitely on my bucket list.  


Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education!

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | Matt's Geography Portfolio |
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

In Wonderland, Alice got a chance to perceive herself as small and as tall after eating and drinking magical food and drink that changed her perspective, and allowed her to perceive reality as something far more interesting than it was ordinarily.  I can only imagine that these scientists that got the opportunity to study ancient buildings and cities from satellites were enthralled like Alice, and became enlightened as to things that a few hundred years ago never would have been able to comprehend.  The idea of new perspectives brought about by spatial thinking and satellite imagery is relatively new, but opens up many possibilities like determining cluster patterns of cities and villages in order to find central areas of societies, and to assess irrigation and agriculture and proximity to areas of currently located water, or water from long ago.  I gave this some thought and compared it to our society.  There would be mills near water, large settlements in the capitols, and other identifying characteristics that would relate rather directly to historical peoples not all that different from ourselves.  Satellites are like the Eat me Drink me refreshments in that we can draw more conclusions from factually obtained imagery from way up high away, and then we can speculate further based on that.  Ancient civilizations appeal to me because I am interested in the origins of humans, which most certainly came from other planets (in my opinion.)  I would hope that there would be some clues visible from the skies about origins and settlement locations from long ago to see where they (in my opinion) landed on this world.


Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.