Matt's Geography ...
Follow
Find
62 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
onto Matt's Geography Portfolio
Scoop.it!

The Ambiguous Triumph of the “Urban Age”

The Ambiguous Triumph of the “Urban Age” | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"At the very moment when urban population has been reported to surpass the rural, this distinction has lost most of its significance, at least in many parts of the affluent world. Two hundred years ago, before automobiles, telephones, the internet and express package services, cities were much more compact and rural life was indeed very different from urban life. Most inhabitants of rural areas were tied to agriculture or industries devoted to the extraction of natural resources. Their lives were fundamentally different from those of urban dwellers."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have spent a lot of time in cities.  I think that urbanization as well as popularity of city-jobs will come to a halt once other planets are colonized.  People will be able to spread out and move towards equilibrium and equality, but right now, cities seem like an excuse to open up potential for danger.  In AVP II: Requiem, the people were ordered to the main area of city for an 'evacuation.'  This evacuation never happened; instead, the area was bombed.  It seems more strategically optimal for foreign or alien invasions to have people living closely in urban areas than it would for them to be spaced out in various country areas.  I know it is terrible to think about that sort of stuff, but the title of this article is "The Ambiguous Triumph of the 'Urban Age,'" and I don't think that cities and urbanization are triumphant at all.  I live in the sticks in Scituate, and I have had so many incredible spiritual experiences in the woods, and deep philosophical discussions with friends there, that I really condemn cities for what it takes away from the spirtual/animal part of being human.  I fear evolution will bring about mass dystopia- as it has done in some countries, and I also do not think that automobiles are a good thing.  I really disapprove of so many things in cities and urban societies, and I am unhappy when I see praise brought into the contexts of terrible achievements that damage the Earth.

more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Matthew DiLuglio
Scoop.it!

Researchers discover massive freshwater reserves beneath the oceans

Researchers discover massive freshwater reserves beneath the oceans | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
The water has been found off Australia, China, North America and South Africa.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I am intrigued that this water was found, but at the same time, I can only hope that people won't use it up in a matter of months.  Humans haven't exactly been wise about using natural resources, and I think that they are not the best species to decide what is done with the water.  Perhaps when humans evolve and treat the environment with more respect, it could be appropriate for them to access this supply of water (which seems to be quite plentiful according to the reports), but I feel that this current generation of humans is like a kid in a candy store— sooner or later, the resources will be gobbled up recklessly, like the rain forests.  I have been accused of having little faith in humanity, and honestly, I don't have any faith in humanity.  I fear them, and do not entirely consider myself to be one of them.  I am also fearful with the reports NASA has released publicly, such as the vast fields of diamonds, the plethora of plastic- on nearby planets and moons in the solar system.  It makes me wonder what people will do with the prospect of "more" things available to them.

 

 

http://youtu.be/cCeeTfsm8bk

 

that is a link to a short animation that sums up my fear of humankind...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Maple Syrup Time

Maple Syrup Time | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I actually made maple syrup about a year ago, a couple of roads away from my house.  I know a family that makes it every year, and I was invited to come join them harvesting the syrup.  I had done it there many years ago, but I had a blast.  The father of a guy I went to school with was there boiling the sap, and we had a lot of interesting discussions about the process, including the importance of the climate.  Apparently, if I remember correctly, it is vital to have the freezing temperatures, followed by warm days- which is also mentioned in the article.  He said that gets the "blood" of the tree pumping, and greatly increases the syrup production.  I got to taste the sap as it was being boiled down to concentrated levels, and it was amazing.  I think that using natural resources like that is really cool.  I had a great time, and know that it takes a LOT of sap to make very LITTLE syrup, but it can be totally worth it. I enjoyed gardening when my family had a garden, and I think that that sort of natural harvest and refinement for consumption can be immensely entertaining, as well as rewarding.  I know this family usually makes enough for themselves, and that they give a little away, and end up having enough to get through the year.  It is a really enjoyable activity, and I reccommend it to anyone that doesn't mind getting cold outside or covered in tree sap.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 7:45 PM

March and April are key months for harvesting sap from trees, making this sugar time in New England.  New England's climate and biogeography make this the right time because the because the combination of freezing nights and warm spring days gets the sap in the native species of maple trees to flow.  The sap get boiled down to syrup, but did you know that it takes roughly 40 gallons of sap that to get 1 gallon of pure maple syrup?  

Louis Culotta's comment, April 8, 2013 8:45 AM
this is cool. A friend of mine bought all the equipment and is making it in the woods in his backyard up in Cumberland.
Mary Burke's comment, April 12, 2013 12:53 PM
When I get pancakes at a restaurant I always ask for real maple syrup. They charge more but its worth it. I venture to say that the Canadian maple syrup subsidies might have something to do with less syrup production around here and also might be why syrup so expensive.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

more...
Justin McFarland's comment, September 12, 2013 6:36 PM
When I first loooked at this picture I thought it was a piece of art. Its amazing has geography can look so beautiful and natural at the same time.
Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 10:32 AM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 4:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Marissa's Geog400
Scoop.it!

Search for survivors ends at collapsed South African building site

Search for survivors ends at collapsed South African building site | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
TONGAAT, South Africa (Reuters) - Rescue workers called off the search for survivors at a collapsed South African building site on Wednesday, believing there are no more trapped construction workers beneath...

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي, Marissa Roy
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Collapsed buildings are horrible.  I can imagine being trapped in a building... when I was much younger, a tree fell on me in the woods.  It took me a while to get out from underneath it, and it really frightened me.  I try to imagine what a hundred trees on top of me would feel like, and I am quite disconcerted.  These workers called off the search for survivors, which means that there were possibly some people still trapped in the building, but also that they were not ever going to be searched for.  That is unnerving.  There is something wrong about giving up on people... I would not be an expert search and rescue worker, but I have had some basic training on what to do in emergency situations, and I don't think that when you believe 50 people are in the rubble, and you give up after finding one body, is anywhere near doing the right thing... "Initial reports suggested as many as 50 workers might have been trapped under the rubble but rescue officials, working through the night with sniffer dogs, recovered only one body and discovered no survivors."  I think that if the rich and politically influential leaders of these areas had lost someone close to them in the rubble, that the search would have been longer, harder, and more fruitful.  I have actually been a part of a local search and rescue operation to find a man that had Alzheimers and had gotten lost, and they didn't give up until a day or so later when they had found his body... I would suggest, like in the same light as the NYC evacuation article for the disabled people to be evacuated, that there be some sort of worldwide mandate to organize people to come up with strategies and plans for all sorts of possible disasters.  If we are prepared, we would not only be not caught off-guard, but we would also be able to save more lives.

more...
Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:18 PM

Although the official reason for the collapse is still unclear, it would seem that worker safety may have been an issue. With one dead, two critical and over a dozen injured, this accident was terrible. Politically, this may damage the reputation of the ANC, who already lack support due to percieved injustices and corruption.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Scientific Guide to Global Warming Skepticism

The Scientific Guide to Global Warming Skepticism | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Examines the science and arguments of global warming skepticism.

 

This is a very accessible (only 16 pages, and without technical jargon) overview as to why there is a consensus in the scientific community that there is human-induced climate change. 


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

This is Global Warming, something I have heard about actively for over a decade.  I do not drive a car, and when I was able to walk everywhere as a primary method of travel, I frequently did so.  Some things that we've learned about are things that I can relate to or understand- like protection of water resources, or studying change in areas as is visible from space,- but Global Warming I don't entirely 'feel.'  Yes, I have noticed that it gets much warmer in summers than it used to, but I can't really see how I can directly have anything to do with it? I know it will affect my generation and future generations, but aside from activism, protesting, and carpooling, there doesn't seem to be a whole lot that it really has to do with anything that I could possibly do about it.  I also know that this pattern has occurred over every several thousand years, and that there used to be ice ages periodically.  We are on a flying orb being hurled through space at thousands of miles per hour, orbiting around a giant flame ball that will explode one day- so we have a species death clock that says that we will either die then or have followed Timothy Leary's SMILE recipe for survival-, in a galaxy in a universe in (an endless? set of larger entities, made up of equally endless?ly smaller entities... endlessly?)...

.... and a slight degree change over a hundred years really worries people?  I can't help but chuckle as I fully visualize that situation.  It's like a nuclear bomb is about to go off, and the guy in the immediate blast radius is afraid of common cold germs on his shoelaces... oh humans... I really am perplexed at what 'the human race' at large considers important...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study

China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

........"Linking the Chinese pollution data to mortality statistics from 1991 to 2000, the researchers found a sharp difference in mortality rates on either side of the border formed by the Huai River. They also found the variation to be attributable to cardiorespiratory illness, and not to other causes of death."

 

High levels of air pollution in northern China – much of it caused by an over-reliance on burning coal for heat – will cause 500 million people to lose an aggregate 2.5 billion years from their lives, the authors predict in the study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

We talked in class about how certain poor working conditions or pollution emissions are permissible in countries whose laws allow for such situations, and how countries like the US arrange for certain work to be done in those countries.  This 'work' stuff all centers around an ever-necessary "profit" that exists as a carrot being dangled in front of a horse as it runs all of its life, blinded to everything else.  It is almost cartoonish, that for a percentage increase in profit due to minimalized expenses, a moral businessman might yield and give in to the temptation of exposing workers to dangerous conditions... or that all businesses might do the same thing... It is socially dangerous; a hazard like bullying, or cheating, using others as human shields to collect the damage while someone else collects the benefits.  I don't think that any life form should be exposed to such unfairness, because it just does not resonate with my philosophical consciousness that any individual should have a better life than another (or worse).  And why make it worse for someone?  Why pollute their areas?  Why steal their natural resources?  Why... Capitalism at all?  I do not think greed is innate to human nature, because selflessness does occur, and is often leaned towards in conventional modern morality/ethics.  I think that the vicious cycle that capitalism puts us in causes us to self-servingly run around like angry rats trying to feed ourselves, which causes us to take out risks on other people, and polluting other people's living space.  It really is sad, because this planet is alive... there is so much life on this planet, assumedly and debateably from this planet, this planet that we consider our home.  To be killing ourselves by not keeping our home clean and healthy is like a very bad habit- it's like smoking.  And it is taking a toll on the planet, as well as its inhabitants

more...
Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, July 23, 2013 11:34 AM

Estudios sobre los graves efectos de la polución en la salud pública china

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 8:20 AM

This article and the accompanying resources describe the damage the pollution problem China has in its cities. China's economic desire to do things as cheaply as possible for the best profit margins has done significant damage to the air and now to its own people. By burning cheap coal to meet energy needs China has created a fairly toxic atmosphere in its Northern cities. The pollution is causing high rates of cardiorespiratory illness and even the government-controlled news can't keep quiet about the issue.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:28 PM

This article explains how China is burning an abundance of coal for heating. The Chinese population is over 1 billion; image the amount of coal that must be burned in order to supply heat for the people of northern China. Unfortunately, the burning coal is polluting the air and causing the Chinese to have lower life expectancies. China, along with other countries should start to find other ways to heat their homes. 

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Access to this area is inhibited due to massive devastation, and there was a LOT of damage done.  These people have needs, and it seems that due to the large geographic spread, it would be near impossible to get these people what they need.  I think if our world revolved less around mandated activity- school, work (specifically the low level jobs that we don't NEED in our society), etc.- that more people could be freed up to help proactively come up with solutions to potential devastation, and groups could be formed, equipped, and trained to deal with whatever Nature could throw at people.  If people didn't work at McDonalds, and they DID work at some sort of international rescue agency, doing all the research on all areas of the world ahead of time, the solutions to these problems (and even prevention) could be at hand within a month of a global task force's initiation into the activity.  I know some Americans think that they need workers at McDonalds, but really... They could be working for something larger than the government- the entire human race.  I'm sure people would be willing to fund such an agency (not just some limited range minimal UN task force, but rather a world-wide formally designated occupation), and I'm equally sure that people would rather work there than flipping burgers and changing french fry oil.  I don't think that the current relief programs are enough to help people in such situations of tragedy as those that were relied on to take care of the issue in the Phillipines, and I think a simple restructuring of society (our society) would yield a greater level of concern and involvement in the welfare of others, as well as greater aid to the species.  Who knows, perhaps one of the people that we could save in the Phillipines is a person who goes on to change the world- an inventor of something new, a holy or political leader, or the scientist that cures cancer?  All this could be made to matter to us more if society were tweaked, even slightly, just to allow people to want to help others.

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 7:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 7:37 PM

Due to the fact the Philippines is made up of over 7,000 islands, it makes aid response very difficult. When natural disasters such as typhoons occur in the Philippines it can negatively affect hundreds of islands, making it difficult to help the people on every island. It can takes days for supplies to arrive on some of the islands, and sometimes people do not even receive necessary supplies such as food and water. Countries, which are composed of numerous islands, face many challenges.  

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:09 PM

Fortunately, the Philippines has a relatively stable infrastructure so even though lots of areas were hit, the human fatalities and issues are not as bad as they could have been. Unfortunately, these are many islands and getting from one to the next is very difficult when all communications and landing areas are compromised.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

more...
Louis Culotta's comment, March 19, 2013 9:49 AM
it makes you think about how lucky we live where we live in the world.
John Slifko's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:53 PM

geography and history were two of Dewey's most important tools in pedagogy in strengthening the imagination of the child 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 9:01 AM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography
Scoop.it!

5Pointz, a Graffiti Mecca in Queens, Is Wiped Clean Overnight

5Pointz, a Graffiti Mecca in Queens, Is Wiped Clean Overnight | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
A warehouse in Long Island City that for years was a canvas for street artists around the world is scheduled for demolition by the end of the year.

Via Gregory S Sankey Jr.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I am an artist, and I feel that graffiti is a community activity that reflects neighborhoods.  I have friends that tag and I hugely advocate their work, which often reflects abstract portrayal of ideas that relate directly back to our community.  The graffiti artists are the voice of a community that has no other way to speak and be heard.  I have been offered to tag with some friends up in Boston, but I didn't have a ride...  Back in high school, I used to do graffiti tags on blank pieces of paper, along with my own poetry and abstract art that I created and drew, and hide them places in the school... I got quite an audience, and people even left me notes back (with praise, questions about philosophy, the universe, meanings of life, etc. as well as their own art and writings) in my usual spots, people that I would have never met otherwise.  That system was a hell of a lot better (and less detention-prone) than spraypainting walls of the school or carving on desks... I would suggest that the public open up an art commune, where people can freely come and paint art, post art, work on collaborations, and live the Art life that so many people would benefit from even experiencing by viewing.  I am an artist, and I love the idea of publically displaying art, and I think that if this way were to come about occurring at a city-level, it would sooth the souls of turbulent spirits- both artists and passersby.  I am working on some paintings... maybe I'll give them away at campus when I finish?  I think art is the greatest gift within the capacity of a human to give, and can shape a community by allowing its voice to be heard.

more...
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 12:23 PM

12 years of angsty urban art wiped clean and scheduled to be demolished. Yet another example of development infringing upon urban culture. 

On the other hand the development is meant to house 71 tenants and also provide space for art-studios. So is it a blessing or a burden on the neighborhood? I suppose that depends on who you ask. But the general consensus is that this event was a sad one, even the owner of the property made claim that he had cried while watching the building be painted over. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 7, 2013 5:53 PM

Unfortunately the fact that this building being torn down and repainted does not surprise me at all. The world is becoming more and more urbanized. Personally I have a lot of mixed feelings about this. It is sad to see the work of so many artists destroyed. Also I don't really understand why everything needed to be painted over if the building is just going to be torn down anyway. I think there could have been something done to try and perserve the art work. However on a positive note, by building these apartments it will create a lot more homes and studios for artists. The builders also intend to create a wall for graffiti artists to use. However that won't replace what has already been destroyed. Authentic culture is becoming less and less important to people as the world becomes more and more urbanized, which is why this incident is not surpising at all. 

Scooped by Matthew DiLuglio
Scoop.it!

Efficient division of labor between humans and robots in assembly systems

Efficient division of labor between humans and robots in assembly systems | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
In a European consortium, scientists will develop cost-effective robot systems and applications for assembly.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

If we are creating robots to serve us, who were we created by/to serve?  Is it possible that we were created to fill some sort of void in existence, and to actually serve the bacteria that benefit from our entropic waste?  The Large Hadron Collider and other super-experiments are yielding information about the universe, its origins, and deeper purpose as is revealed by characteristics and trends of quantum particles.  I don't live on Earth; my mind is often elsewhere, exploring other places, and dreaming of better days... I am absolutely horrified that a large number of democratic represenative fools gave permission and funding to projects that would allow humans to find out the secrets of the universe--- we have been trusted as 'stewards' of this planet, and look at the terrible things we have done- nuclear detonations, murder/manslaughter, slavery, pollution, extortion, etc.... I just cannot imagine what will happen now that humans are digging into the history of the universe.  Humans should not be doing that until they have taken care of what they currently have access to!  We are bad robots... who knows, maybe some alien created us, and did it for the purpose of destruction of other forms and ways of life?  I am glad that I can consider these things, but I think that there is a hierarchal existential division of labor, in which we humans carry out the destruction and processes that were ordered by another sentient entity.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

more...
David Ricci's comment, April 30, 2013 6:47 AM
Japan clearly has their job cut out for them due to the geography of the country. Thier land has very limited airable land making agriculture extremely hard to maintain. The mountainous terrain also makes travel much harder for these people. Because of this their population like stated in the video has been pushed to hotspots like the yamato region. Japan has developed their culture solely based on how disconnected they are from the rest of the world. Japan is a chain of many islands so they have to import alot of their goods. This means having good trade partners, always making new trade partners, and avoiding conflict. This didnt work so well looking back at world war II. Unfortunately they must either become more self sufficient like chris said, or they have to stay on the good sides of alot of other countries.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, April 30, 2013 9:51 PM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 7:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Food Machine

Food Machine | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

UPDATE: The PBS episode "Food Machine" premiered on April 11th, 2012 on the series "America Revealed."  Now the episode is available online. 

 

"Over the past century, an American industrial revolution has given rise to the biggest, most productive food machine the world has ever known.  In this episode, host Yul Kwon explores how this machine feeds nearly 300 million Americans every day. He discovers engineering marvels we’ve created by putting nature to work and takes a look at the costs of our insatiable appetite on our health and environment.  For the first time in human history, less than 2% of the population can feed the other 98%." 


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

The Industrial Revolution really changed things, but it is hardly an improvement, because so many people are without the benefits of the rich percentage.  People's roles are becoming solid components that are entirely replacable and part of the machine rather than becoming creative- and by creative, I don't just mean artsy.  I think that the Research and Development part of any machine entity is the part that allows it to adapt and modify in order to change for the better and the greater good.  I look at humans as an alien species inhabiting a planet, and I could make the analogy to a college fraternity.   The planet is a mess, people try to make a buck off each other at every given opportunity, and I particularly dislike that the rich people band together like frat brothers, instead of giving less-priveledged persons the opportunity to attain equal status.  I don't think like everyone else, but I do make efforts to partake in realistic activism to cause change for the betterment of all beings- human or not.  I do believe in predestination, and that everything around us is a material and spiritual echo from the dawn of creation, but I also believe that the flaws present today will disappear tomorrow through courses of events where chosen people will alter the formation of the future, for the benefit of all beings.  Right now, with people undertipping pizza delivery men, and not donating the optional dollar at stop and shop, it is the flawed 'today' phase of the timeline, but the Industrial Revolution has made it easier for society to embrace component roles, however replacable or expendable, and that in the end will achieve greater contentment and universal success.

more...
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 5:46 PM

This is a great video covering our industrial agricultural complex

Scooped by Matthew DiLuglio
Scoop.it!

Agriculture needs decent wages for farmers — ITC chief

Agriculture needs decent wages for farmers — ITC chief | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
What can we learn from the criticized G-8 food alliance and what's the best way to to ensure better returns for small farmers?
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I saw this quote--

“Agriculture is not just about food. It’s about livelihoods, it’s about poor communities, it’s about climate change, it’s about energy,” said Gonzalez.

--

and was interested... The farmers I know are not usually in financial trouble, not by any stretch of the imagination, but I think that capitalism is not the way to go about agriculture, or anything.  People didn't ask to be born.  People need food.  Why extort people and make them (the people who did not choose to become alive) required to pay a lot of money every day of their lives for food (that they need to eat)?  That really bothers me.  Yet there's nothing I can do about it.  I do make donations for hungry children though, to give them a bite to eat.  They didn't ask to be born at all, let alone to be poor and hungry.  You have those kind of people, and also the multi-billion dollar rich folks that strut around, drive Lamborghinis, and worry more about the longevity of their stock market inheritances or investments, than they do about their next meal.  I have long been confused by capitalism.  I don't have a day job... I am a freelance composer, and I write music when opportunities present themselves.  Aside from that, I am an artist- I write books, I paint paintings, I work on creating abstract films with friends, and I write music.  I have been known to sell albums for a dollar, and I have in total donated more money than I have made from my artistic pursuits.  I wonder what would happen if these small farmers that want more money gave a portion of that money or of their crops to the hungry, rather than the excessively rich?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from geography
Scoop.it!

Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Courtney Burns, Denise Pacheco
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

A friend of mine from elementary school married a Christian woman, who converted to my friend's religion, Islam.  My friend's wife now wears the traditional hijab (spelling?), the holy garb for women that covers their heads.  I think that it's really cool that people have that sort of uniformity in their everyday life, united under a religion, and I think it really must mean a lot to my friend.  I am in an English class this semester, and there is a girl who wears one.  I think it's a respectable article of clothing to wear, probably more so than bikinis.  I guess that had I not been friends with my friend, I might not be as likely to think so.  I wonder about the weather, and what people did with the hijab-wearing during immense heat.  I can logically see that bikinis are more likely to be comfortable for females, than hijabs would be, but there is something said about the respect and sacredness of traditional religious clothing.  I really respect my friend, although we have sortof fallen out of touch after he moved out of town.  I think that as I had mentioned in a previous 'scoop,' having a friend of that religion has kept my eyes and mind open to tolerance and embracing the different culture of Islam.

more...
Denise Pacheco's curator insight, September 25, 2013 5:27 PM

This picture is definitely an eye opener for some people and cultures! I honestly don't think it has anything to do with men unless the culture is male dominant and all men are in charge of that country over what women should or should not wear. I can't speak for other countries, but in the US, we are allowed to dress as we please. It's completely up to the woman on what she feels comfortable in and it also has to depend on the occasion. Weather, advertisement, social media , and etc do have a lot to do with it because of the influence it has on our youth. But our opinions and assumptions on why women in other countries, especially religious based cultures, comes from what is taught to us in schools and what we hear or see on tv and the news. Most US citizens are under the impression that women in other countries who are covered up, dress that way because they're husbands, fathers, or male population don't allow for them to dress otherwise because it is an offense to their culture and religion.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Canyons

Canyons | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"A canyon is a deep, narrow valley with steep sides."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Canyons are really cool to look at, but they also tell stories.  The various layers of rock can be dated based on crystal structures and possible organic content in sediment, and the eroded sides can be traced back to wind, or in some areas, water-based erosion patterns.  I think that shows that one does not just have to look at the rocks, but one can use their imagination to view history, and even infinite time by considering that the canyons are transient and shifting messages that are carved into rocks by the world, and the universe.  I think that where the article said people have relied on and depended on canyons, it brings to the surface more illumination of the immense convenience of humans having everything they need to survive- just on this one planet...  Food, clothes, shelter, can be created by what is around us.  It is like we were put here with resources- it sorta feels like some of the Sim games.  I do believe aliens are responsible for putting what is now known as the human species on this planet, and I do believe in the abstract yet artificial terraformation of Earth by aliens.  Canyons erode, and die away, as do humans.  I can't help but believe that they are messages from the natural universe, along with the material resource provisions that have been so widely abundant for humans on this planet.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2013 9:45 AM

This encyclopedic entry is a concise explanation of the environmental forces that create canyons. 


Tags: water, physical, geomorphology, landforms, National Geographic.

Scooped by Matthew DiLuglio
Scoop.it!

Malala's global voice stronger than ever

Malala's global voice stronger than ever | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
The Taliban shot Malala Yousafzai to silence the outspoken Pakistani teenager once and for all. But it backfired: Her voice is now more powerful than ever.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

While I view Malala's efforts as positive, I can't help but think that she is merely challenging "the establishment..." I think lots of things are ridiculous in this world, and that she should be shot for protesting is one of them, but realistically, I think that the Taliban could be roughly equated to the law enforcement division of the government of the US, and I think that if we stood up to even the ridiculousness of police enforcement, whether it is 'for a cause' or not, we would get brutalized too, and reap the consequences.  If I wanted to stand up against a law that truly oppresses what I believe I should have access to, and I... for example, publically smoked marijuana, does that mean that I should reach international acclaim and fame, with funding from other countries?  I personally believe, based on friend's testimonies, and research in books... that marijuana is more important than even the most basic forms of elementary education for living  beings.  And it is illegal in most of the 50 of the 'United' States.  And I would be punished for using it in places where it is not legal.  While I don't want Malala to be besmirched, I do think that society is considering education as important as possible because of her undeniably foolish (in terms of danger presented) protests, while there are much more valuable things in life, such as entheogens, that would not be as valued if publically protested, due to... being besmirched.  I do not believe spiritual sacrements should be prohibited, and I also do not believe that some forms of education should be prohibited (like... do you really want dangerous radicals making advanced nuclear weaponry? but other forms are ok...)... How about countries having laws that do not restrain individuals from actions that do not bring negative or unwanted actions against other people, as is generally suggested by the UN Declaration of Human Rights...?

more...
Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:41 AM

It really is amazing what this girl has done. It is crazy to think that some women today are not allowed to get an education. For Malala to risk her life for her education and the education of women is truly amazing. I can't even imagine growing up in a country where men will shoot you for wanting an education. I think by standing up and fighting for what she believes in might actually help create a culture change. However with this being said it won't be easy. They have such strong cultural beliefs that women and education shouldn't mix. But I do believe that one day Malala's battle might one day change things for women in education. 

Scooped by Matthew DiLuglio
Scoop.it!

Who BEARS THE burden after natural disaster?

Who BEARS THE burden after natural disaster? | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Drake, Colo. • Lifelong canyon resident Mary Myers hangs a painted sheet from her front porch overlooking the Big Thompson River. On it is a list of who Myers thinks has helped her and who she thinks hasn’t.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I want to move to Colorado sometime in the next 10-20 years when for me it will be more of a viable option than it would be as a right now 2013 spur-of-the-moment kind of thing.  I would like to plan for it, and make sure that there is a better chance of my residence being within a non-flood-plain zone, rather than winding up getting flooded.  I noticed that the rent for decent apartments in some areas of Colorado is absolutely dirt cheap, and the next best thing to them paying you to live there... but these areas are in flood zones.  It really is best to know the area before you move too, and I can use my hometown Scituate as an example- every year some roads flood... Knowing where this happens allows for my family to take safer detours rather than risk any sort of accident.  There are safer roads to take in the freezing/snowy weather, which would avoid sliding off the road in ice, or down a hill without brakes.  Knowing an area is important to me, because I plan to learn more about where I would move to long before I actually permanently move there, in order to save myself from any bad situations that might have happened before in those places, situations that might happen again.  I traveled a bit this past summer, and the people I met had really different lifestyles down south, and they were afraid to go outside during the 55/60 degree weather because that was 'cold' to them... I guess all situations could be subjectively rated as bad, worse, or not bad at all, but I definitely want to know all of what I would be in for, before I moved into a new area.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Political Ecology: Mapping the Shale Gas Boom

Political Ecology: Mapping the Shale Gas Boom | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Where in the United States is fracking unlocking natural gas from shale rock?

 


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

In class we studied "fracking," or the fracturing of shale deep in the Earth with blasts of fluid, which produces a harvestable oil yield and much pollution to aquifers in the area.  I live at a house sometimes, where the water is rusty- and it really prevents me from doing much of anything with the water.  I can't cook with it, I can't shower in it, I can't drink it, I have to use bottled water to even brush my teeth because the simple rust content is so vile.  I cannot even imagine what the industrial acid- hydrochloric acid, as well as other contaminants in the water- would do to the water someone relies on...  I think of situations where neighbors trees are dangling over someone else's property, and how branches may be required to be cut down because of their interference with neighboring property, and I would hope that something can be done about protection of aquifers, along the same times... If there is something negative or unwanted affecting someone's water, something really should be done about it.  Knowing that there are negative consequences that come along with fracking, I really can't fathom why people do it!  I live in a protected watershed area in Scituate that does not allow development of any kind on one side of the road because of the Scituate Reservoir.  People are not allowed in the Reservoir Property at all, let alone not allowed to dump waste or cause any sort of harm to the environment, because a huge portion of the state of RI gets their water from that reservoir.  I am not an absolute tree-hugger, but I also don't think that such problematic activites should be 'stirred up' in areas that affect something that humans rely on and need to survive.  While I see that I am not affected by these shale fracking ops as are indicated on the map, I also DO care about the peope in those areas! Why should they be subjected to such putrification of their water resources?  I am once again perplexed by the darkness of humanity.

more...
Candy Copeland's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:08 PM

Many communities are fighting fracking.  In Texas a man sued oil company and the oil company lost so they conter sued the man for defamation.  Parts of Colorado have recently passed laws to keep fracking out of their communities.  

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 12:48 PM

This was a very interesting topic to read about,  its clear the issue of fracking has so many cracks to it(haha). While whats occuring is completly unnatural, the economic forces behind it are clear, this is a big way to help give amercans cheeper gas. However the effects it has locally are increadibly destuctive and will likely have futher consiquences as fracking continues. I noticed by looking at this map that policialy it seem like fracking is occuring in the red states, seems they want to use there land for the resouces even though it might destroy. While politicaly librals want to protect there enviorments of there blue states. This really adds anouther levle to it and how the placment of these new gas companys is panning out arcosss america.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 8:06 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of the ecological perspective of geography because it describes the relationship between political geography and the ecological makeup of a region.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

more...
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 5:03 PM

It is really sad that there wasn't a plan in place already for diabled people in such a time. However I don't think that the city of New York should be fined for it. This poor planning most likely exists all around the U.S and this was an eye opening experience as to what needs to be done for the future. Any money they are fined should be used towards a relief program or for a plan for future crisis's. However instead of fining them I think the government should order a new plan of attack for the futre, and all of the money should be put into that plan. The city might be able to create a sort of transportation sytem for disabled people or even warn the city earlier next time. It is tough to accomodate everyone in a crisis because there is so much commotion goin on, but I do belive that there can be a better plan put in place to make sure everyone has a fair shot to evacuate. No person should be stranded because of a disability. New York needs to put their money into creating a plan of attack for the future and other states need to follow suit so that we can prevent something like this in the future. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:34 AM

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

Scooped by Matthew DiLuglio
Scoop.it!

Times of Oman | Column :: Sustainability test for new age mega cities

Times of Oman | Column :: Sustainability test for new age mega cities | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Again, I will assume the perspective of not advocating for cities.  This article is about cities, and how it is cheaper for the government for people to live in the same area while the government making it look like it helps the people, and the now mainstream subliminal approval for the eradication of natural beauty and wonder... being replaced by the federally endorsed MEGACITY!  I like Megaman. I don't like cities. I hate megacities.  Will these super cities and their supposed sustainability allow Earth to survive? or will they produce more pollution and kill the planet that most of us call our home, while leaving more and more people out of touch with nature?  I am from a rural area- ponds and woodlands in the undeveloped area of Scituate, where development is actually prohibited by the government... and I love it.  I would immensely be opposed to other people living in cities with no access to the natural beauty of the world.  It frightens me, this megacity idea, which aims to have no need for country life... and later on, further down the road, they will likely try to set up megacities in rural areas, destroying all that I have known to be beautiful and come to love in this place...  I plan to contribute to the advocacy of rural areas by doing what I can to stop overpopulation- not having children.  I don't like humans, I don't like Earthlings, I don't like their megacities and bureaucracy, I don't like the direction that they are heading, and I don't like being part of a group of people that did not choose to exist in places that we further did not choose.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography of Aspiration

Geography of Aspiration | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Try to replicate it with development schemes all you want, but you're overlooking what makes New York City—and other places of ambition—so great.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I think that historical opportunity is what makes NYC so great... well, great as implied by the writers of this article.  Having a good history, it is only natural that it would become something so popular and draw the ambitious to it.  In contrast, a newly formed colony of humans on Mars would be potentially better- because in this hypothetical/planned colony, people would be able to benefit from the fact that they are building from the ground up, from scratch, and with the knowledge of other development schemes/trends that occurred elsewhere.  This could entirely circumvent all ill aspects of society... Sometimes to create, one must first destroy... perhaps NYC should be rebuilt to eliminate problems, before humans move on to other worlds?  I thought NY was a bit of a mess when I drove through with my cousin.  The graffiti was gorgeous, but the filth and traffic were quite triumphant, and it is not a place where my ambition would lead me.  I think true talent will be found, regardless of this subliminal advertisment brought about by the article endorsing NYC as a 'place of ambition.'  Not all of us can go to these 'meccas' of talent... but it doesn't mean we are any less extravagent as life forms.  I would ask if most people would want to make it big in places like that, or if they would rather be happier, elsewhere.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 2013 8:38 PM

Part of the economic success of a city can be an overriding cultural ethos of the metropolitan area.  This elusive spirit of the city is often referred to as a sense of place, which many sound 'fluffy' to some, but can have some very tangible impacts on the urban economic development.  This article answers the question, "How does a sense of place impact urban economic development?" by using various U.S. cities such as New York City, Portland and San Francisco.  


Tags: urban, economic, place, neighborhood.

Dean Haakenson's comment, June 6, 2013 8:30 AM
Very cool.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:53 AM

This reminds me of the production method idea you taught us where even though you may be able to produce 2 products better than a third world country it is for the best if you have them do what they excel at while you do your thing. (You made a lebron james reference in class). the reason why im connecting this is because every city has its own thing to offer with San fran being the arts portland with the mom and pop shops and new york with the enterainment. if you can excel at what you do then your city can blossom.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Portland: A Tale of Two Cities

Portland: A Tale of Two Cities | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Portland is a city that some residents praise as a kind of eden: full of bike paths, independently-owned small businesses, great public transportation and abundant microbreweries and coffeeshops. And then there’s a whole other city. It’s the city where whole stretches of busy road are missing sidewalks, and you can see folks in wheelchairs rolling themselves down the street right next to traffic. It’s the city where some longtime African-American residents feel as if decades of institutional racism still have not been fully addressed."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I don't think that Earth offers everything for everyone.  Given the situation of predetermination about birthplace and essentially upbringing, social class, and outcomes, in an infinite universe (infinite until proven otherwise), a single small planet cannot possibly offer us everything we are destined to need in the universe, let alone the towns that we are limited to.  I do not believe in choice, I believe in destiny... I do not blame people for racism or crimes, as HORRIBLE as they may be. I think that people are made into what they are by the world around them, in existential and defining ways.  Yeah, there is plenty of room for improvement and change in Oregon, but realistically, there is also more room for improvement in other areas too.  I don't really see humans as the sort of people that will ever get better without some sort of divine intervention.  I am taking the perspective of separation of paradise and purgatory that was mentioned in this article, and applying it to a different scale, but I do believe that mankind is to be condemned by the universe, due to its faults and inability to play well with others.  The world freaks out when kidnapping victims are found after a decade of abuse and captivity, but this same world breeds animals for slaughter and consumption... Earthlings clearly have been taught to not care about those that are different, whether in looks or species... I think the kidnapping situation is vile and appalling, but I also think that breeding species for slaughter (which affects more living beings) is democratically more of an issue.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 10:11 AM

Portland, Oregon is often discussed as a magnet for a young demographic that wants to be part of a sustainable city that supports local businesses and agriculture.  This podcast looks behind that image (which has a measure of truth to it) to see another story.  Relining, gentrification, poverty, governance and urban planning are all prominent topics in this 50 minute podcast that provides as fascinating glimpse into the poorer neighborhoods of this intriguing West Coast city.  When in cities, we often use the term sustainability to refer to the urban ecology, but here we see a strong concern for the social sustainability of their historic neighborhoods as well. 


Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic, racepovertyplace, socioeconomic.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 10:21 AM

Recently I came across a craigslist post from a gentleman who was trying to rally individuals to Portland with him for a journey on the "Michigan Trail" to Detroit. He made promise that the intention was to perform rejuvinating work in  Detroit alongside it's current residents and that there would be "no gentrification." 

Not that I found these statements or intentions to be profound or useful in anyway, but this podcast really put a nail in the coffin for me. The effects of gentrification are well known for both their positive and negative aspects. But the bottom line is this, regardless of intention the poor and diverse populations will be displaced unless it is from them that this renaissance takes place. Not Portlandia hipsters looking for some sort of "promise land."  

Portland apparentely has it's own issues with gentrification and a class of social and cultural norms that make it difficult to make the case for cities on the rise to take the same path.  

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography
Scoop.it!

The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities

The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Residents and planners around the country are dreaming up innovative ways to create eco-friendly, self-reliant communities. But turning ideas into reality is a tall order.

 

Urban revitalization projects gentrification have been an important part of the American scene since the 1990s.  As we reconsider the city, and some of the associated issues with dense living, many are also thinking about the environmental impact of urban life and rethinking how to make neighborhoods more sustainable.  This article uses the Denver Lower Downtown (LoDo) neighborhood as its case study for analyzing sustainability with the city.  


Via Seth Dixon, Gregory S Sankey Jr.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have totally thought about this before, and a family that I know just spent the past several months remodeling their house to be more 'green.'  I think that in addition to energy, neighborhoods could have community grow-ops, where they grow all the necessary crops to sustain their area- fruits, vegetables, grains, cotton, etc. and I think that the communities would be cleaner, greener, and brought more together if they had the opportunity to work every day to provide for themselves and their community.  I miss out on a lot of enjoyment in life because I have to do things like school.  Other people miss out because they have work, or other obligations.  I think that if people farmed as communities, it would be economically, environmentally, and socially proficuous, as well as eliminating a need for capitalistic trade with other regions, where people might get cheated.  I have so many ideas of Utopia that I have gotten from reading and philosophizing with friends and acquaintences, but there really are so few people that have the ability to implement anything on a large scale, that I am often frustrated with these concepts of 'betterment.'  It really is sad that people are taught so much these days, because their brains are full of garbage, rather than new possibilities.  It would be really interesting to have an experimental colony where these ideas of sustainability could be tried out, but I think that will happen long after my generation has died.

more...
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 12:11 PM

Here we have the perfect example of the positive effects associated with gentrification. Unused and weathering space being revitalized and re-purposed for the benefit of local economy and communitites. Not only that but the intention of these projects is to also operate in an ecologically sustainable manner by using as little resources as possible. The occupation of mill space is something that's even been seen here in Providence, most notably the hope artiste building in Pawtucket on the Providence line.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Ambiguous Triumph of the “Urban Age”

The Ambiguous Triumph of the “Urban Age” | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"At the very moment when urban population has been reported to surpass the rural, this distinction has lost most of its significance, at least in many parts of the affluent world. Two hundred years ago, before automobiles, telephones, the internet and express package services, cities were much more compact and rural life was indeed very different from urban life. Most inhabitants of rural areas were tied to agriculture or industries devoted to the extraction of natural resources. Their lives were fundamentally different from those of urban dwellers."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have spent a lot of time in cities.  I think that urbanization as well as popularity of city-jobs will come to a halt once other planets are colonized.  People will be able to spread out and move towards equilibrium and equality, but right now, cities seem like an excuse to open up potential for danger.  In AVP II: Requiem, the people were ordered to the main area of city for an 'evacuation.'  This evacuation never happened; instead, the area was bombed.  It seems more strategically optimal for foreign or alien invasions to have people living closely in urban areas than it would for them to be spaced out in various country areas.  I know it is terrible to think about that sort of stuff, but the title of this article is "The Ambiguous Triumph of the 'Urban Age,'" and I don't think that cities and urbanization are triumphant at all.  I live in the sticks in Scituate, and I have had so many incredible spiritual experiences in the woods, and deep philosophical discussions with friends there, that I really condemn cities for what it takes away from the spirtual/animal part of being human.  I fear evolution will bring about mass dystopia- as it has done in some countries, and I also do not think that automobiles are a good thing.  I really disapprove of so many things in cities and urban societies, and I am unhappy when I see praise brought into the contexts of terrible achievements that damage the Earth.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography
Scoop.it!

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon, Gregory S Sankey Jr.
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

more...
David Ricci's comment, April 16, 2013 7:28 AM
As i read this article I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side. I wanted to take all of the information presented to see the pros and cons that are related to GE foods. After finishing my reading it seems to me that the debate revolves around whether or not these crops and foods are bad for you. If they are bad, then do the pros outway the cons? I can say that after reading the article I dont feel much more educated on the topic. There seems to be a large grey area covering GE crops. The only people who know the full extent of these projects are the people in charge and the government. With the information that i have gained today though, i can say that GE crops have the potential to be extremely benefitial aroud the world. Many places that have trouble growing crops can use GE crops that withstand bugs and even climate. These benefits can help with cost minimalization in areas that need it, potentially creating better and more farming in areas around the world that need it. GE crops if regulated properly can atleast for a time have a global effect on food and agriculture. A jump in production of crops can help economies and help the general wellbeing of countries that have trouble producing even close to the right amount of food for the people living there.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 1:04 PM
An interesting article to read, it talked about the genetically modified seeds and food that is created by companies and then grown by American and other farmers worldwide. This article relates to the globalization point that we talked about in class. The seeds are genetically modified here or elsewhere in the world and then sent to farmers all over the globe to grow for increased profit typically. Many countries around the world, especially third world countries, have food shortages and by genetically modifying food so that farmers can get a bigger harvest, more people will be fed and less would die to famine and malnutrition. Like David, I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side while I was reading. The article did seem quite vague regarding argument points however it gave facts left and right which I found to be new to me and fairly interesting, learning that 70% of food that we eat has at least one GE ingredient. Time will tell if this has prolonged pros/cons I suppose.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 10:41 AM

I love the hard facts that this article presents, in a very unbiased way. I've heard many claims from 'both sides of the aisle' about GE crops, but have never in one article seen such a clear and concise representation on the actual truths (or myths) surrounding the GMO debate.