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Local Life Expectancies

Local Life Expectancies | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties


Via Seth Dixon, Courtney Burns
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 8:30 AM
I wonder what the link between male longevity and Iowa males is? Perhaps the connection the land -physical work and local food.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 7:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 10:59 AM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
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Population Density

Population Density | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

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Izzy Bennett's comment, October 7, 2013 1:26 PM
I love this map because it really shows how the population is spread out across the world. It's amazing how Australia and Canada are practically empty, especially compared to China and India!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:31 AM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

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European women marry, give hope to Samaritans

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
MOUNT GERIZIM, West Bank (AP) — The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I know a man who is Indian, and his grandparents came from India.  He tells me that their people do not formally or very much at all approve of interbreeding between their people and other cultures.  He says Indians stick with Indians, and that's how it's supposed to be.  I think in the future that the genetic diseases will be abolished by selective characteristic modification through reproductive alteration using technology- I think DNA modification will become a popular trick in both reproduction and everyday life that will allow for the end of illness.  This would allow people to marry into other cultures without fear of genetic complications, but they would still have that cultural barrier my Indian acquaintence referred to.  That same dude has some funny insight about Italians and other cultures, and noted that Italian-Americans are not really Italian at all.  We had a couple of interesting discussions regarding different cultures, and he told me that he is 100% Indian.  I don't mean to seem degrading AT ALL but the first thing that popped into my head was how people breed dogs to be purebreds, which are coveted and expensive, as well as pure.  I'm a blend of many different nationalities, and I'm proud of it... The universe is a blend of many nationalities, and I ever-ponder my connection with the Universe, and it's nice to know that I have a commonality with the Universe!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:39 AM

Some folk cultures, such as the Samaritans, have historically intermarried and have been plagued by genetic diseases.  Recently, they have turned to global solutions to their local demographic woes.  "Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community."  


Tagsfolk culture, gender, population, Russia, religion, culture,
Middle East


Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 9:00 AM

It's a very interesting and sad phenomenon when groups that thrived in the past begin to dwindle to a point where the acts of individuals can decide the entire future of the demographic. It brings in questions of tradition and if those people have a duty to propagate their genes to keep their group alive. I can only imagine how tense the environment could be when single accidents or deaths could mean the end of your people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 9:14 AM

This article describes a how the small religious group, the Samaritans, have seen their numbers shrink to unsustainable levels and have been forced to turn outside to find wives. These men are importing brides from places like Ukraine because of a significant gender imbalance and heightened risk of birth defects due to genetic homogenization over the centuries. These circumstances present an fairly unique case of migration, one which should it become a standard practice, could have an effect on the culture of the Samaritan communities.

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

The presence of large numbers of people that speak languages other than English at home occurs on the east and west coasts of the U.S., but largely in the south and western areas of the U.S..  In high school we used to have discussions about how there were many immigrants coming into the U.S. from or through Mexico.  With migration comes cultural diffusion, as the people coming into the United States bring their language and many other cultural elements of their country of origin with them.  I know there are certain neighborhoods in cities in Rhode Island where most people that I see on the street are speaking Spanish.  I have a relative that has married an immigrant from Guatemala, and she learned that the North East coast of the U.S. Is where many people from Central America move to- often in groups that settle as communities to help each other.  I can understand that it is essential to live near people that speak your language, and it makes sense that their strength and comfort in numbers is also a way of having a "home away from home."  Being the area of the world on the southern land border of the U.S., and that Central America consists mainly of Spanish speakers, it fills in the Southern areas of the U.S. with people that speak a language other than English.  The coasts overall can be explained as being populated by people that speak languages other than English at home because they contain ports of travel and trade, and are points where many flights from other countries would land and drop off travelers and migrants.  That and beautiful ocean views make the coasts a great place for foreigners to settle and live.  These pull factors are likely influential reasons for people to relocate to the areas on the map.

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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:48 AM

While this is ostensibly a map that would be great for a cultural geography unit, I'm also thinking about the spatial patterns that created this map.  What current or historical migrations account for some of the patterns visible here?  What would a map like this look like it it were produced 50 years ago?  Why are Vermont and West Virginia the only states without a county with over 10% of the population that speak another language at home? 

 

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Maria Lopez's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This map is a great visual showing how multicultural the United States has become. This change is visible however is more states than others. For example, Most of the West Coast and Texas is made up of bilinguals that can speak both English and Spanish. I believe because they are so close to Mexico and that California sees a large influx of immigrants this would make sense. In addition, Florida is also another state that sees immigrants entering from overseas and has a large Cuban population because of this that Florida would be bilingual as well. It is interesting to see that in both Hawaii and Arizona, indigenous Native American languages are still spoken. Finally, the Dakota's have a large population of German speakers which I would have never associated together in the past. It is very interesting to see if these languages expand any further in the next ten years.

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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

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David Ricci's comment, April 30, 2013 6:47 AM
Japan clearly has their job cut out for them due to the geography of the country. Thier land has very limited airable land making agriculture extremely hard to maintain. The mountainous terrain also makes travel much harder for these people. Because of this their population like stated in the video has been pushed to hotspots like the yamato region. Japan has developed their culture solely based on how disconnected they are from the rest of the world. Japan is a chain of many islands so they have to import alot of their goods. This means having good trade partners, always making new trade partners, and avoiding conflict. This didnt work so well looking back at world war II. Unfortunately they must either become more self sufficient like chris said, or they have to stay on the good sides of alot of other countries.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, April 30, 2013 9:51 PM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 7:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Population growth seems to be a trend that we see happening now as sharply increasing, but it is supposed to level out.  I doubt that this will happen.  Realistically, there are correllations between colonizations of other countries and population growths.  We are at a time when people are signing up to start colonies on Mars, and inevitably, other worlds.  Compared to the tiny confines of Earth, the large universe waits for us with open arms and trillions (potentially even infinite times) the quantities of living space.  Perhaps the leap in population comes at a time when we will be colonizing other worlds.  If Earth in the now can hold 7 billion people, and it is expected to level out under double that, that means another Earth-sized plane would be able to hold the same number as Earth, assuming all needs can be met (food, water, etc).  Earth is becoming one of the homeworlds of one of the dreaded species seen in movies, like Aliens, that spreads like an infection.  The multiplying on the homeworld has been seen as abundant, but speculation of the future is even more scary.  I would guess that DNA modification would take place in the relatively near future to protect colonists from the wrath of raw space and mishaps that may befall them on the colonies, as well as eliminate a few of the needs of humans- oxygen, food, water- to make the available living space more suitable for them.  Look at it like a bucket of rainwater filling up in the rain- at full capacity, there is no other option if the rain keeps falling; it begins to overflow.  My speculation is based on where there is available land for colonizing, and it seems that we humans might move to nearby, and eventually, more distant worlds, instead of trying to overpopulate Earth.

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Valorie Morgan's curator insight, August 28, 2013 6:38 AM

This link shows exactly how small the world seems to be also how far apart we actually are. Pictures presented on this link show lives, we could not even imagine of in America. One of the pictures that seemed to stand out most was the ethic family of sea gypies. They based their entire life in sea water. They do not have the source of fresh water, or any source of electricity and only come to the land to bury their dead. This really shocked me, I cannot think of a life entirely lived in water, it sounds crazy but it makes me wonder, how do they get the fresh water every human needs?? It's possible they have a method to strain the salt from the water, but this is really somthing to look into. 

olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 26, 2013 12:37 PM

WORLD POPULATION

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:36 AM

This should definitely be a major concern for the human planet becasue if people are multiplying that quickly and staying alive longer than the futre could be facing some serious problems. For example; the food supply could run low, shelter could definitely become scarce, diease could become a high risk becuase there are so many people that are close which means they could be sharing a number of things.