Matt's Geography ...
Follow
Find tag "geospatial"
40 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

In Wonderland, Alice got a chance to perceive herself as small and as tall after eating and drinking magical food and drink that changed her perspective, and allowed her to perceive reality as something far more interesting than it was ordinarily.  I can only imagine that these scientists that got the opportunity to study ancient buildings and cities from satellites were enthralled like Alice, and became enlightened as to things that a few hundred years ago never would have been able to comprehend.  The idea of new perspectives brought about by spatial thinking and satellite imagery is relatively new, but opens up many possibilities like determining cluster patterns of cities and villages in order to find central areas of societies, and to assess irrigation and agriculture and proximity to areas of currently located water, or water from long ago.  I gave this some thought and compared it to our society.  There would be mills near water, large settlements in the capitols, and other identifying characteristics that would relate rather directly to historical peoples not all that different from ourselves.  Satellites are like the Eat me Drink me refreshments in that we can draw more conclusions from factually obtained imagery from way up high away, and then we can speculate further based on that.  Ancient civilizations appeal to me because I am interested in the origins of humans, which most certainly came from other planets (in my opinion.)  I would hope that there would be some clues visible from the skies about origins and settlement locations from long ago to see where they (in my opinion) landed on this world.

 

more...
Isaac Sheynkman's curator insight, January 24, 7:54 PM

Archaelogist Sarah Parcak has been using satellite technology to find ancient Egyptian pyramids, palaces, and settlements.  With the use of that technology, in 2011, they were to locate 17 pyramids, 1000 tombs, and 3100 ancient settlements.  They were able to find out throught this technology that patterns of site looting have increased between 500 to 1000 percent since then the spring in the arab areas.  People were stealing things from tombs 5000 years right when people got buried.  

elizama ramirez's curator insight, January 25, 12:15 AM

DR Sarah Parcak a archeologist is passionate about finding  ancient settlements under the sands. She uses a satellite technology as a resource to find these ancient settlements. It can be either pyramids, temples, or just statues.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

more...
Justin McFarland's comment, September 12, 2013 9:36 PM
When I first loooked at this picture I thought it was a piece of art. Its amazing has geography can look so beautiful and natural at the same time.
Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:14 PM

Yesterday at the ESRI User Conference, the Urban Observatory was unveiled.  The physical display contained images from cities around the world to compare and contrast diverse urban environments.  The online version of this was announced during in a 10 minute talk by Jack Dangermond and Hugh Keegan.  This interactive mapping platform let's users access 'big data' and have it rendered in thematic maps.  These maps cover population patterns, transportation networks, and weather systems.  This is a must see.  Read Forbes' article on the release of Urban Observatory here.


Tags: transportation, urban, GIS, geospatial, ESRI.

Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Rescooped by Matthew DiLuglio from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | Matt's Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


Via Seth Dixon
Matthew DiLuglio's insight:

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.