Maths resources for South African teachers
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Maths resources for South African teachers
A broad selection of articles, talks and ideas for Maths teachers from the Internet, courtesy of St Alban's College Library (If you would like to receive a weekly newsletter of the latest items in this Scoop just mail me at vanzyla@stalbanscollege.com)
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What Have Mathematicians Done For Us? - Professor Chris Budd OBE I Gresham College

Published on Nov 28, 2016
The contribution of mathematicians over the centuries will be celebrated, showing how mathematical ideas have huge relevance today varying between Maxwell and the mobile phone, Florence Nightingale and modern statistics, Pythagoras and the development of music, Euclid and art, Euler and Facebook, and Cayley and Google.

Mathematics has played a vital role in the development of human civilisation, and is the foundation of much of modern technology and popular culture. However, the achievements of mathematics and mathematicians are often unknown or misunderstood. Even basic mathematics can make a profound difference to our lives.

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The Extraordinary Theorems of John Nash - with Cédric Villani I Royal Institute

Published on Nov 2, 2016
Fields medal winner Cédric Villani takes us through the very special world of mathematical creation of John Nash, who founded several new chapters of game theory and geometric analysis in just a few revolutionary contributions that seemed to come from nowhere.

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How algorithms rule our working lives | Cathy O’Neil

How algorithms rule our working lives | Cathy O’Neil | Maths resources for South African teachers | Scoop.it

1 Sep 2016

Employers are turning to mathematically modelled ways of sifting through job applications. Even when wrong, their verdicts seem beyond dispute – and they tend to punish the poor

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Why is TV 29.97 frames per second? I Standupmaths

Published on Oct 3, 2016
I look at the historical quirks which gave us TV at 29.97 frames per second. In North America at least. It's a comfortable 25 fps in Europe.

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Hidden Figures: The Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Powered Early Space Exploration

Hidden Figures: The Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Powered Early Space Exploration | Maths resources for South African teachers | Scoop.it
A heartening testament to "the triumph of meritocracy" and to the idea that "each of us should be allowed to rise as far as our talent and hard work can take us
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A History Lesson: When Math Was Taboo I NPR

A History Lesson: When Math Was Taboo I NPR | Maths resources for South African teachers | Scoop.it
Math is "contemptible and vile."

That's not from a disgruntled student. It's from a textbook.

The author, 16th century mathematician Robert Recorde, nestled the line just after his preface, table of contents and a biblical quote citing God's command to measure and number all things.

Recorde didn't believe in math's awfulness — quite the opposite. He was simply reflecting popular opinion on his way to a spirited defense of math. Why?
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Who Was Ada Lovelace, The World’s First Computer Nerd? I DNews

Published on May 27, 2016
This 19th-century female mathematician created the first computer program, but do you know who she is? Who is Ada Lovelace?

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The Prime Problem with a One Sentence Proof - Numberphile

Published on Jul 18, 2016
A prime number problem posed by Fermat that has been proved multiple times - including a famous proof using one just sentence.

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Can You Solve The Red Ball Lottery Puzzle? I MindYourDecisions

Published on Jul 10, 2016
This problem involves 100 red balls, 100 blue balls, and 2 urns. First you distribute all the balls between the 2 urns, placing at least 1 ball in each urn. Next, you select an urn at random, and then draw a ball at random from the urn. You win $100 if you draw a red ball. What is your best strategy for distributing the balls, and what is your winning percentage?

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Let's Talk About Sets - Numberphile

Published on May 17, 2016
Dr Bobby Wilson talks about sets... Sum-free sets, fractal sets... All sorts of sets.

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The Advanced Mathematics of the Babylonians | JSTOR Daily

The Advanced Mathematics of the Babylonians | JSTOR Daily | Maths resources for South African teachers | Scoop.it

25 March 2016

The Babylonians knew their mathematics thousands of years before the Europeans.

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How statistics can be misleading - Mark Liddell I TED-Ed

Published on Jan 14, 2016
Statistics are persuasive. So much so that people, organizations, and whole countries base some of their most important decisions on organized data. But any set of statistics might have something lurking inside it that can turn the results completely upside down. Mark Liddell investigates Simpson’s paradox.

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The Simplest Impossible Problem

Published on May 3, 2014
A 7-year-old can understand this problem which completely baffles mathematicians.

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5 cool math tricks ft. Technicality I Physics Girl

Published on Nov 3, 2016
Math can be fun when you play with the rules, use it to do everyday things like fast math for calculating tips, and do some math magic tricks! Plus, math is the language of physics. Check out these 5 fun math tricks with Alex from Technicality.

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How I Rewired My Brain to Become Fluent in Math - Issue 40: Learning - Nautilus

How I Rewired My Brain to Become Fluent in Math - Issue 40: Learning - Nautilus | Maths resources for South African teachers | Scoop.it

15 Sep 2016

"When learning math and engineering as an adult, I began by using the same strategy I’d used to learn language. I’d look at an equation, to take a very simple example, Newton’s second law of f = ma. I practiced feeling what each of the letters meant—f for force was a push, m for mass was a kind of weighty resistance to my push, and a was the exhilarating feeling of acceleration.I memorized the equation so I could carry it around with me in my head and play with it. If m and a were big numbers, what did that do to f when I pushed it through the equation? If f was big and a was small, what did that do to m? How did the units match on each side? Playing with the equation was like conjugating a verb."

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Origami Soma Cube I Singingbanana

Published on Sep 23, 2016
The soma cube is a famous puzzle among mathematicians. Seven tetris-like pieces fit together to make a 3x3 cube. I made one from post-it notes.

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Manchester Mega Pixel: world's largest analogue digital image I Standupmaths

Published on Sep 22, 2016
Get involved with the Manchester Mega Pixel!

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How the Königsberg bridge problem changed mathematics - Dan Van der Vieren I TED-Ed

Published on Sep 1, 2016
You’d have a hard time finding the medieval city Königsberg on any modern maps, but one particular quirk in its geography has made it one of the most famous cities in mathematics. Dan Van der Vieren explains how grappling with Königsberg’s puzzling seven bridges led famous mathematician Leonhard Euler to invent a new field of mathematics.

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Why the metric system matters - Matt Anticole I TED-Ed

Published on Jul 21, 2016
For the majority of recorded human history, units like the weight of a grain or the length of a hand weren’t exact and varied from place to place. Now, consistent measurements are such an integral part of our daily lives that it’s hard to appreciate what a major accomplishment for humanity they’ve been. Matt Anticole traces the wild history of the metric system.

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This Mathematician Hacked His Way To True Love On OkCupid I Vocativ

Published on May 17, 2016
Chris McKinlay was just like thousands of other graduate students. He spent most of his nights chiseling away at his PhD thesis—an arcane treatise on large-scale data processing with supercomputers—living on a couple hundred dollars per month, sleeping in his cramped cubicle, and scrolling listlessly through online dating sites in search of love or, at least, a worthwhile diversion. That is, until he hacked OkCupid.

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Can One Mathematical Model Explain All Patterns In Nature? I DNews

Published on Jul 14, 2016
All patterns in nature might be describable using this mathematical theory. How did Alan Turing influence how we see the natural world?

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A children’s game and a mathematical breakthrough - The Boston Globe

A children’s game and a mathematical breakthrough - The Boston Globe | Maths resources for South African teachers | Scoop.it
“Most mathematicians who play the game see the interesting math. You say, huh, this is actually an interesting question, then you find that the question already existed and is older than the game,” says Jordan Ellenberg, a professor of mathematics at the University of Wisconsin and coauthor of the recent discovery. He first came across the game while teaching at a youth math camp in the 1990s.
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A history of nothing: how zero went from nil to something | Aeon Videos

From ancient trade to modern theoretical physics and computer programming, the history of mathematics closely mirrors the history of zero – first as a concept, and then ultimately as a number. Narrated by the UK mathematician Hannah Fry, this short animation explores how the evolution of the understanding of zero has helped shape our minds and our world.
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The Long Search for the Value of Pi I Scientific American

The Long Search for the Value of Pi I Scientific American | Maths resources for South African teachers | Scoop.it

March 2016

The mathematical odyssey, plus a guide to calculating pi for yourself

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How Making Music Made Math Cool in this Classroom | Class Act - Soul Pancake

Published on Nov 3, 2015
Robert “Mr. Mac” MacCarthy, a sixth grade math teacher at Willard Middle School in Berkeley, encourages his students to love math through creating rap music videos.

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