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Rescooped by Paul Cogghe from Digital Delights for Learners
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The Problem Site: Problem Solving and Educational Games

The Problem Site: Problem Solving and Educational Games | Mathematics | Scoop.it
Problem Solving and Educational Games - solve problems, brainteasers and puzzles, and play educational games at The Problem Site

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Paul Cogghe from Eclectic Technology
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5 Methods for Developing Problem-Solving Skills > Eye On Education

5 Methods for Developing Problem-Solving Skills > Eye On Education | Mathematics | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 13, 2013 10:25 PM

Check out this infographic that provides five methods for developing problem-solving skills. Try out:

* Brainstorming with a Twist

* Word Association

* Inkblot (Rorschat Test) and this is a bit different than you might expect

* Solute vs Solution

* Gallery Walk

The names above do not do justice to the activity that you would so with your students...so click through to the post to learn more!

Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, March 14, 2013 6:41 PM

Critical thinking on the run!  I love this idea to share with your students in groups.  Collaboration, word association and problem solving on the spot!  Love it!

Rescooped by Paul Cogghe from Common Core Online
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Perseverance in Problem Solving, Part II

Perseverance in Problem Solving, Part II | Mathematics | Scoop.it
In part I of this two part series, I introduced a couple of ideas I have about defining perseverance in problem solving and some instructional shifts that need to happen in order to achieve those goals.

Via Darren Burris
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Todd Parker's curator insight, December 19, 2013 1:32 PM

I love this article on perseverance in problem solving.  It lays out what perseverance is in a problem solving context, how to instill and apply it, and the pitfalls to avoid when expecting perseverance out of our students.  I think that people (and some teachers) are ready to accept that some kids can persevere and others just can or will not.  They look at it as if it were inborn or absent from a person's personality.  The article makes a great point about students needing to make connections or relationships about the problem before they can move on to other stages of solving it.  If we can't give our students a basic foundation for the problem, how are they going to persevere?  We need to use strategies in place as teachers in order for us to expect our students to power through tough problems.  It's up to us to help them to make the necessary connections so that they can power up and power through problems.  The students in my fifth grade classroom will shut down quickly if they can't make connections to prior knowledge.  I have to build a bridge for them in order for them to engage in the mental labor of problem solving.  Perseverance can be a skill built in a person.  You don't have to be born with it.  And once you deploy strategies like questioning with your students and they experience a little success, it's amazing how much perseverance you can see.