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Differentiated instruction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Differentiated instruction

Differentiated instruction and assessment (also known as differentiated learning or, in education, simply, differentiation) is a framework or philosophy for effective teaching that involves providing different students with different avenues (often in the same classroom) to acquiring content; to processing, constructing, or making sense of ideas; and to developing teaching materials and assessment measures so that all students within a classroom can learn effectively, regardless of differences in ability.

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I wanted to explore differentiated learning and learn about the process of it. If I were to become a teacher I would have to learn about how to deal with many different types of students. So differentiated instruction can help me in successfully teaching the students. But I first wanted to take a look at what it is. Although I had some idea of the concept I wanted to explore a little bit more. Wikipedia although a lot of teachers do not allow to be used I still believe it can be a good resource. It allows me to see a whole process and background. In this article they talk about the definition, purpose, background on where it stemed from, and then goes on to provide how it it used and some steps in the process of it. Although it does not provide much depth it was useful in just gaining some knowledge about it in order to expand on the idea. I still have questions about how it is used? What do other people think about the process? And what is the best way to use it?

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Differentiated Instruction - Videos, Articles, Resources, Experts

Differentiated Instruction - Videos, Articles, Resources, Experts | Math education | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
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Before even getting to the video within the definition was the word recognizing. This related back to the idea of learning the environment and picking up on the differences of a classroom. I thought that was a very important word to have within the definition. The purpose of including this video is because it allowed me to get an actual look at differentiated instruction in action. I could read many articles and watch very video about differentiated instruction and why it works and get many opinions. I appreciated the chance to see how it actually works in a real life setting. Also as I was watching this I started to think back to my own schooling. I started to realize the patterns of differentiated instruction. It was especially prominent in my elementary school. As I was watching this I could start making those connections. This video also allowed me to start thinking about if I become a teacher how I could arrange my class to be suited to all the different learning abilities of the class. 

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Tips & Strategies for Effective Differentiation & Instruction.wmv

This video will help teachers with differentiation of instruction to provide an effective, engaging, learning environment by creating a culture of student su...
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

I think this was a great learning tool for me. It is different from the majority of my other articles in that I actually gives instructions and teaches me how to use differentiated instruction. Clearly this is not the most scholarly video and there is so much more to learn about effectively teaching. And although I had said in my other articles about the idea of differentiating and how it is not something with a solid structure and how you have to learn based on the environment and how its important. And I still believe that but what this video allowed for me is to see the other side and learn about the straight structure and what to do. Learning has multiple components and while I believe that one of the more important aspects is learning and working with the environment learning the structure and format can be just as important. Because it creates the basis and allows for growth. Learning this ideas and getting instructions give us some groundwork on how to successfully expand on them in order to help our students. That is why I thought it would be important to include this as well. In order to give me some foundation to expand on.

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Community College Students: Why We Hate Math

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My favorite sunject growing up was always math. But I also realized by talking to my friends and people around me that it was not a very popular opinion. I always heard about how much people disliked it. So one of my major goals for becoming a teacher was to change this opinion. To make math approacable and enjoyable for all students not just a select few. So in my journey to get there I wanted to figure out exactly why people disliked it. So when I wanted to explore why students disliked math I saw this video. And there were a couple of reasons I liked it. First I like that the responses came from real students who at struggled with math. Instead of some scholarly article talking about why they believe students dislike math. I also believe that they touched on a couple of reasons that I had definitely heard before. Such as they didnt know what the math related to. Asking the question when will I need this? And i think that is a very smart question to ask. And one of my goals would be to show how this math relates. They also touched on something about memory. That people often forget certain concepts and that class is boring. I definitely had heard a lot of that growing up with my friends. And I think that is something that can be improved on. Learning why students feel this way is just the first step to finding a solution. 

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Many math students are flailing, repeating courses without success | EdSource Today

Many math students are flailing, repeating courses without success | EdSource Today | Math education | Scoop.it
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This resource allowed me to see from a different perspetive why there is such a demand to teach students so many different skills in math. Although I had originaly thought that it is better for students to work at their own pace and spend more time learning their basic skills. This allowed me to see from another perspective why it is important to push students a little more to be what the school considers on level. Because I can understand that it is true that if students fall behind it will be far more difficult to keep them motivated to get them to the level they need to be for high school. And I can see how if the students can keep on pace they will fall back as they get higher on. But I wonder then how do we keep all the students on pace if they are having difficulty. What is the best way to deal with the different skills and levels of the student. What is the best way to not pressure students to go to a level that they are not prepared for while also making them stay on track? Is there a way to make it fair and equal for everyone?

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Coping With Math Anxiety -- Platonic Realms MiniText

Coping With Math Anxiety -- Platonic Realms MiniText | Math education | Scoop.it
Article on math anxiety, its causes, and constructive ways to cope with it, especially on homework and exams.
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article really picks up some important aspects of math. Math anxiety is actually something I never really thought about directly. Although after reading this article it makes a lot of sense to me and I can definitely say it is something that I have seen. I had however never thought of it by name. I like that they call it anxiety because a lot of people would think that it is something that is controlled or somehow not actually a real problem. But anxiety is in fact a real biological response. And something that most people can not control but it can be dealt with. Once people realize what the problem is they can work to resolve it. And its not something that can solely be fixed just by studying or learning math. It is deeper than that they have to work on themselves. And by having teachers realize this it can help to develop a teaching style that will help the students with it as well. Another great point of this article is when they mention how easily people play off their math skills. There is definitely a stigma in math related to students. Most students have no issues just saying " I cant do math". And removing that attitude that people just sometimes are good at math is one of the first steps in reforming math education. As long as people just play off their math skills they will never grow. Another great aspect to this article includes the math myths. As I was reading them I even realized that I believed some of them. As if they had been ingrained in my brain. But by making students realize that they are truths they can take a step back and really start learning.

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How to Fix Our Math Education

How to Fix Our Math Education | Math education | Scoop.it
The current curriculum is not a good way to prepare a vast majority of high school students for life.

 

THERE is widespread alarm in the United States about the state of our math education. The anxiety can be traced to the poor performance of American students on various international tests, and it is now embodied in George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind law, which requires public school students to pass standardized math tests by the year 2014 and punishes their schools or their teachers if they do not.


Via Michael Rees
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This does a good job at addressing some students concerns such as from my first article. It thinks about a question people always ask about in math "when will we need this"? It is a question that students often ask because they dont understand the purpose of math. I like that this article was not afraid to say maybe what students are being taught is not something that they will actually use. Not to say that it doesnt have a purpose because I believe that all math has a purpose but it may be true that perhaps not all the students have to know it. Maybe all students dont really have to follow the normal sequence of algebra, geometry, more algebra, pre-calculus, and calculus. Maybe some students would be better suited trying different sorts of math instead of just "pure" math. Perhaps if we were to allow this students would be more willing to work in math if they felt good about what they were actually learning. This now begins to offer a solution to something that may improve math education. It would take a lot more to really reform math education but I believe that realizing some of these ideas can take us in the right direction. 

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Differentiated Instruction with UDL | National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials

Differentiated Instruction with UDL | National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials | Math education | Scoop.it
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article takes into further depth the process of differentiated instruction. There were certain components to this chart that I found valuable. The title of this chart is "Learning Cycle and Decision Factors Used in Planning and Implementing Differentiated Instruction". I thought that seemed like an appropriate name because it did not say that this is the structure for differentiated learning it instead talks about learning and making decisions. This expresses the idea that differentiated instruction is not about doing something a certain way but instead just about learning to deal with the classroom environment. The article then goes to explain the different components and one word that always stuck out to me was "flexible". That word struck me because I interpreted it to mean that there is some choice. Probably on the part of the techer and the student. Being flexible means that there does not have to be a set structure and probably shouldnt be. Also as I was reading about the components I appreciated that it allowed me to not only learn about what to do but also what to look for. I have learned from my teachers that teaching is not just about what im putting out but also what im taking in and learning as well. This article helped me look into the process and explore how it is used. There is still a lot I would like to learn. Such as what people think about it? Is it truly fair and how can we make sure that it is equal for everyone? And just to get an idea of how others use it as well. 

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Differentiation

Differentiation | Math education | Scoop.it
We're all capable of learning, unlearning and relearning. We're all capable of adapting to changes. We're all capable of evolving and improving, just as we're capable of acting stubbornly and simpl...
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article provided me with a couple of different things. First it provided me an actual opinion. And when it comes to certain things such as education opinion can be just as important as fact. Sometimes we have to think what do people actually feel. Another thing this article allowed me to do was take a step back and not just think about how I can help the student but first think how does the student need to be helped? How could I help someone if I do not realize what they need. So by alloweing myself to think about this I can more effectively help a student. And realizing that it is not just about what I do for the student. Perhaps something that can be even more effective can be making the students work together. Instead of necessarily breaking them up and teaching them differently by having students of different levels work together perhaps they can learn off of each other. I appreciated how this article made me think a little differently but it also left me with many questions. Such as what this person actually wants us to do? He has good thoughts but what is the best way to put thoughts into actions. I also still wonder how others think about differentiated instruction and how it compares to him.

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OP-ED: Differentiated Instruction: Easier in Theory than in Practice

OP-ED: Differentiated Instruction: Easier in Theory than in Practice | Math education | Scoop.it
Differentiated Instruction is not the same as honors classes or acceleration.
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article allowed me to look from a new perspective. So far I had been thinking about how useful differentiated structure can be. But i realized by reading this article that sometimes we have to look from both sides of the spectrum. To truly get an understanding of how it works I have to see some negative aspects as well. Teaching is not something that is black and white so when learning about an aspect of learning how can I look from only one side. In order to grow we need to explore all possibilities. Including what is wrong with differentiated learning. Although I have formed an opinion about differentiated instruction and how it can be useful in teaching I do understand the negative points of this article. I appreciated that this article wasnt entirely negative. This article explored more and related to both positive and negative effects. I also appreciated that they talk about how it affects the teachers as well. Although I do believe that teachers should think about how they can help the student. And my goal as a teacher would be to help my students however I can. But I still believe that by including this I can expand my ideas even more. Thinking about how the teachers are effected can allow teachers to learn and grow. And that is something that can always be useful. The article then related it to other actual debates that are happening. This allows to take a step back about the theory of differentiated learning and takes it into reality showing some of the effects that it makes on the whole community. That is yet another opportunity for learning. This article also finally gave other ideas in comparison to differentiated instruction. This allowed me to realize other ways of closing the "gap" in education. By exploring different ideas such as this I can finally think about a productive way of teaching. Although I still dont know everything about how to successfully teach I've realized that I do not have to. By exploring different ideas I can start to form my own and hopefully as a teacher I can use these ideas and build from it some more. 

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Column: Why our kids hate math

Column: Why our kids hate math | Math education | Scoop.it
Patrick Welsh: By pushing algebra on younger students, more pupils require remedial courses. Less is more, and slower is faster.
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article allowed me to see another reason for why students dislike math but this one allows me to see it from a different perspective. This article talks about outside forces that may be why students may be having difficulty. They talk about this puch to get students to a certain level and even though I always enjoyed math that is something I remember feeling. There always seemed to be this pressure to get students to a certain level that the school thought the students are meant to be at. I also noticed they talked about pushing students to a level before they learned their basic skills. Which I understand. i always noticed that math builds on its skills. So if I was ever absent for anything or just fell back oon a concept it was very difficult to get back. So it would seem logical that if someone fell back on their skills it would be very difficult to get back on course. Especially if the course was moving at a very fast pace.But I still wonder how with everything moving so quickly and so many different standards to teach how we can effectively teach students of many different levels and skills so that the material is challenging yet not undermining them and their skills. 

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How I get all my students to be good at math

How I get all my students to be good at math | Math education | Scoop.it
As a mathematics educator for the last seven years, I can attest that most folks believe they either are or are not “math people." And that idea of innate math ability is very harmful to both those who believe they possess it and to those who...
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article begins to explore what are some good techniques to teaching math. What i especially like about it is that it talks about the actual students. Instead of just talking about what to teach or the material it goes deeper than that and talks more about the actual students and what would be the best way to make them feel comforatble in math. The article talks about how to differentiate math so that the students realize that it is not all the same. I thought that was very smart because I have noticed that students always clump together all the different types of math and make general statements about how they hate math or are bad at math. I think it would be a good technique to realize that there are multiple different skills and techniques in math. That may help the students realize that even if they dont understand some aspects in math doesnt mean they wont understand any of them. She also talks about persistence and that if they work hard enought they can pick up the skills they need. This gives the students the idea that they are all capable of doing math. She brings up the idea of overconfidence which can also be dangerous. That students should not become complacent and that they have to keep working to achieve. This also levels the playing field for all students. Instead of creating the idea that students are at different levels it instead think about how all students are capable and have to work to succeed. Then for the last part she steps away from the students and mentions how teachers and others should change. She is giving responsibility to other forces instead of just thinking that it is all about the students she realizes that other people play a factor as well. This really brought new light to me to think of teaching in this way. But there are still some questions that I would want answered as in how do we implement these thing in our teaching styles? How do we work with this and common core standards? I would want more depth about the best way to relate this to an actual classroom so these ideas are successfully implemented. 

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Self and Peer Assessment scaffolding sheets | Great Maths Teaching Ideas

Self and Peer Assessment scaffolding sheets | Great Maths Teaching Ideas | Math education | Scoop.it

Via William Emeny
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article helped me think about a new perspecitive. Not just thinking how I can directly help the student but also how they can help themselves. Or get help from other peers. It was good for me to realize that they can get help from many places. And sometimes working with their peers can be effective for them build confidence and learn. I thought the charts were an effective way of also making the students think about themselves. And although exploring my own thoughts have always been difficult for me Ive realized that is can be an effective way to grow and find new understanding. This article gave me some good ideas. And especially allowed me to think of a few of my own. And hopefully when I can become a teacher I will be able to expand my horizons about skills and activities to help my students. 

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William Emeny's curator insight, November 17, 2013 1:22 PM

Idea to improve the quality of feedback given during self and peer assessment

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Where should math teachers be focusing when teaching #commoncore

Where should math teachers be focusing when teaching #commoncore | Math education | Scoop.it
A collection of PDF's detailing the mathematical content emphasized in the Standards by grade level. These can be used as guides to inform instructional decisions regarding time and other resources.

Via Darren Burris
Rakhee Cherian's insight:

This article is different that most of the articles I focus on. And thats why I thought it was important to include. When I first saw it my thougths were that it wouldnt fit in to what I wanted to research about. But that I realized that that what I want to write about is math and how to teach it. This article shows exactly that. Whether or not I like common core or standards they are still a critical part of teaching because it relates to the subject: math. As a teacher it is my goal and responsibility to help my students learn what I am presenting. So thinking about my actual subject matter is an important part. This allowed me to think about what the students are expected to learn (whether or not I approve) and allows me to think what is the best way of going about it. Because in math there are certain things that students will need to focus on in order to achieve the grades and levels they need. Math necessarily isnt equal. Certain times concentrating on certain aspects can in fact increase learning. Especially in relation to testing and moving on to other course.certain material will be more relevant than others. I expect that if I ever become a teacher this will be something that would be a great resource to me in my journey to be a successful math teacher. 

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Chryste's curator insight, November 8, 2013 3:59 PM

Great tool for demonstrating what the major work is for any given grade level!