Math Education
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Flipped Classroom A New Learning Revolution ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Flipped Classroom A New Learning Revolution ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Math Education | Scoop.it
Danielle Leibowitz's insight:

One of the hot topics in education today is the "flipped classroom," which for those who don't know, means that instead of lecturing in class and assigning practice material for homework, this traditional model is flipped, and students watch the lecture at home and do their homework in class. I think that this is a really interesting idea that has promise, especially looking at the data on how student performance has increased as a result of its implementation. For a math class I think this would be great because often times the lecture can be overwhelming and although students probably haven't fully grasped the content duing the lecture, they haven't had adequate time to process the information so they often don't ask questions. With the flipped classroom, however, this problem would be eliminated because students would be able to watch the lecture on their own time, having the ability to replay the lecture as well, so that they can acquaint themselves with the material, and then by the time class comes they can have questions prepared. This makes for much more interactive and effective class time.

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We need a war on poverty, not teachers

We need a war on poverty, not teachers | Math Education | Scoop.it
The right loves to demonize unions, but economic factors are much more important to success in the classroom (We need a war on poverty, not teachers - the importance of economic factors in classrooms http://t.co/k6JwXadxD8...
Danielle Leibowitz's insight:

I found this article very timely because I recently had a lengthy conversation with a teacher from the school I observe at--which is low-income--about the effect of poverty on education. While this article is brief, it still delivers the point that although the education system in America as a whole could use improvement, statistics show that our top schools are highly competitive internationally, and thus our attention should be focused on improving our low performing schools, which are often located in impoverished areas. Seeing as presenting this exact text to a class may be controversial, looking at statistics on educational performance in the U.S. and other countries could be a way to objectively bring this relevant topic into the classroom, while also incorporating math into the lesson. Perhaps students could be given a set of statistics on test scores and performance ratings of a variety of countries, as well as information about the culture of these countries, then the students could perform some statistical operations on these numbers, and finally, based on their data, students could make comparisons between the nations and regions within the U.S. to draw conclusions about similar trends that may be a cause for high or low performance, such as resources, values, etc. While this topic may be sensitive any way you frame it, I think this would bring some highly relevant information into the classroom, and would allow students to draw upon students math skills, while also engaging their critical thinking.

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Put down that pizza slice, math teachers

Put down that pizza slice, math teachers | Math Education | Scoop.it
In attempting to create an environment where children feel engaged in math, much of the math has been eliminated altogether
Danielle Leibowitz's insight:

This article brings up an interesting debate about what instructional methods should be used in math classes that I think warrants some discussion. While there is a lot of literature in favor of using concrete concepts that students are already familiar with to help them learn new, more abstract material, this article points out that relying on the concrete may turn into a crutch later on. I think this is something teachers should take a moment to reflect and form an opinion on. The example used in the article relates mostly to early math, but would the same point hold for more advanced math? What is the difference between using something as a crutch and using something to illustrate a concept? I believe that this is something teachers could bring up with their students to find out more about their thought processes and where they might be using crtuches or shortcuts to solve a problem as opposed to using these outside connections to better understand the content.

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U.S. math instruction less effective than Chinese math teaching

STEM education U.S. math instruction less effective than Chinese math teaching. Published 25 October 2013. Share |. International comparisons of students in mathematics have shown higher performance by several nations than by students ...
Danielle Leibowitz's insight:

Comparing STEM education in the U.S. to other leading countries is a great practice for bettering our education system; however, the question is, of all the comparisons we make, which ones are useful for policy reform? If two nations are drastically different, what changes can feasibly be implemented? While some may think these are only questions for the experts, I think this is a discussion that could also be had in the classroom. Seeing as many teachers already ask students what methods of instruction are beneficial to their learning, why not introduce some texts relating to the matter and grow the discussion? Perhaps a text such as this article could be brought into the classroom, and some Chinese math content and instruction style could be experimented with to see how students respond. I would recommend trying this because it could provide insight into the way students learn that could be beneficial on a large scale for studies such as the one mentioned in the article, and also on a small scale for the purpose of the teacher learning more about the students' learning.

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The iPad and Parental Engagement in Education

The iPad and Parental Engagement in Education | Math Education | Scoop.it
Parents have a very different perspective. Whilst educators wax lyrical about the potential of the iPad for learning, there are concerns from parents about its impact on their child. Or so we thoug...
Danielle Leibowitz's insight:

I found this article very interesting because as time moves forward and technology becomes more present in the classroom, it is important to bear in mind both the pros and cons of integrating technology into education. In this article, students were given a trial use of iPads and feedback from parents and students was very positive. Overall, students were more engaged in their learning, worked more collaboratively with their peers, and learned a set of valuable skills, such as making presentations, that arguably would not have been learned without the iPad. Concerns about the iPad, such as poor handwriting and traditional literacty skills, were minimal. I as well think that the iPad is a great tool for learning, and could be used for any subject, including math. One use, for example, could be to have students look up data on websites such as Social Explorer and to interact with this data in a visual, interactive way. Viewing data in this way helps students to visualize what the numbers look like, allowing them to better conceptualized the information. Nevertheless, while iPads are a great tool for learning, what are the implications for individuals and schools who cannot afford to give students iPads? Will high-income schools acquire even more tools for their students while low-income schools remain with limited resources, continuing to widen the achievement gap? At the same time, should we limit top performing students on the basis of equality? I feel that all students should be given every resource that is available to them, however, I feel that as we invest more and more into our high-performing schools, equal efforts need to be made to rise up our low-performing schools.

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Google+ Connected Classrooms Brings The World into Your Class

Google+ Connected Classrooms Brings The World into Your Class | Math Education | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Danielle Leibowitz's insight:

This article was an exciting find because I had recently read about virtual field trips and now I got to see what they are like! This is honestly the coolest thing, and the imagery is so clear I almost feel like I'm there. I can see this being an incredible tool in the classroom to expose students what exists beyond their school walls without having to go through the hastle of planning a trip and causing students to miss other classes. The experts in the video also seemed to enjoy doing the virtual trips, so it seems like a win, win. I think that any content area teacher could use this to enhance their lessons, and I think that students would really enjoy it as well. So neat!

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Nick Berry's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:41 PM

As you can see, this method of using Google + provides students with a chance that is as close as possible to a real school excursion. This entire Connected Classrooms experience can be viewed live or played back to classes around the globe.

 

Whilst watching these recordings and live broadcasts, students could be instructed to collect data/information  and later represent this data through electronic means - fulfilling one of the Year 3 and 4 Technology Content Descriptors.

 

"Collect, access and present different types of data using simple software to create information and solve problems."  (ACTDIP009)

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Wolfram Alpha Launches Problem Generator To Help Students Learn Math

Wolfram Alpha Launches Problem Generator To Help Students Learn Math | Math Education | Scoop.it
  via Techcrunch If you’re studying math or science, you are probably pretty familiar with Wolfram Alpha as a tool for figuring out complicated equations. That makes it a pretty good tool for ...
Danielle Leibowitz's insight:

As someone who was never particularly savvy with Wolfram Alpha, but often heard friends talk about its wonders, it is exciting to me to here about this new service that the website is offering, which I could potentially use as a teacher. Bascially, what the new feature does is it generates practice problems of varying difficulty in a variety of subjects that students can try, and if they are struggling, step by step instructions will be given. I think this could be something great to use for class because students already know and use Wolfram Alpha on their own accord, so it shouldn't be pulling teeth to get them to use it for purposes relating to class that would be directly beneficial to their learning. Perhaps if the bredth of subjects covered by the service is large enough, students could even be assigned problems from the website  for homework in addition to or in lieu of problems from a textbook. This way students could also get immediate assistance with their homework. The technocalities of this would require some research, but certainly food for thought.

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