math
12 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by alexparrish
Scoop.it!

Number of major math changes for California students

Number of major math changes for California students | math | Scoop.it
First-graders will get tiny tastes of algebra while learning to add, and middle school students will be exposed to statistics and geometry while still solving for X.
alexparrish's insight:

math is evolving and is startng to ge more intence for everyone

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by alexparrish
Scoop.it!

Some states better than others when 8th-graders' math, science ...

Some states better than others when 8th-graders' math, science ... | math | Scoop.it
Researchers took eighth-grade test results in math and science from the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) to predict performance on the international comparative study test known as the Trends in ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by alexparrish from CLOVER ENTERPRISES ''THE ENTERTAINMENT OF CHOICE''
Scoop.it!

Problem Solved? 8th Grade Math Curriculum May Change in Saratoga - Patch.com

Problem Solved? 8th Grade Math Curriculum May Change in Saratoga - Patch.com | math | Scoop.it
NBC Southern California
Problem Solved? 8th Grade Math Curriculum May Change in Saratoga Patch.com The new eighth-grade math course will be more rigorous than a general pre-algebra class but not as complex as Algebra I, Tom Adams, head of...

Via VERONICA LESTER
alexparrish's insight:

In this article is that online sites might have a change in their math curriculum for 8th grade. Also they were talking about how the new math course will be more rigorous. If you don’t what rigorous means it means it means to be extremely through. But they said it should not be as hard as algebra 1. Something that concerns me is how they said that they didn’t talk about how they would teach the students. Also they said it would be more difficult than a pre-algebra class. One thing that I would like to know is if it’s just changing the curriculum on this site or all over California.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by alexparrish from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

47% of 8th grade students taking Algebra 1 or higher math

47% of 8th grade students taking Algebra 1 or higher math | math | Scoop.it
Over the last several years both parents and school leaders have pushed more and more students into middle school algebra. Is it helping? What role with the Common Core State Standards play? Read our latest blog post.

Via Mel Riddile
alexparrish's insight:

This article that I scooped was about 8th grade math standards. Some of the things it was talking about were how 47% of the 8th grade was able to take algebra 1 or higher forms of algebra. Another thing it talked about was how adults and teachers are starting to notice this to. One of the ways the adults might have noticed this is that is by the algebra test scores are higher than usual. Or that maybe that if they put out a higher level algebra question just to see where the student is in math. Another way to find out if the students are a higher level of Math, is by putting them through a series of different algebra Questions.

more...
Tai Hong's curator insight, May 6, 2013 8:50 AM

As time passes, we learn more about everything, including education. When we know more about how to educate students, they become more capable of exceeding our limits than we are.

Rescooped by alexparrish from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Algebra, Rigor, 8th Grade, Math Acceleration | Jason Zimba

Algebra, Rigor, 8th Grade, Math Acceleration | Jason Zimba | math | Scoop.it

Jason Zimba in EdWeek

 

"It is incorrect to say that algebra isn't covered until high school. There is a great deal of algebra in the 8th grade standards. For example, students in grade 8 are expected to solve two simultaneous equations with two unknowns. I don't see a lack of rigor there. The standards actually invest heavily in algebra because of the way they focus so strongly on the prerequisites for algebra in the elementary grades.

 

I actually think the questions about algebra are better formulated as questions about acceleration. How will kids who are ready for advanced work accelerate to reach courses like calculus during high school? But those are questions for policy, not for standards. The standards don't speak to this issue. Decisions about acceleration and ability grouping are still the purview of local districts, just as they've always been. For example, I've seen where the state of Massachusetts has provided some interesting guidance for districts showing several different models for acceleration, all of them ending at calculus in the senior year of high school."


Via Mel Riddile
alexparrish's insight:

In this article that I scooped the main topic of this is how 8th graders are expected to do a little bit of algebra. Then it talks about how they are supposed to be able to solve a problem that has two unknowns. Then he talks about how it has to do with a lot of algebra because it somehow invests a lot to do with algebra. Then he starts talking about how algebra is better described with questions about acceleration. One way he says its better described in terms of acceleration is they start getting better and accelerating faster. The last part of the paragraph is a little bit confusing to me but I tried to put it in my best words.

more...
No comment yet.