MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
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MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
Examining the development of the Massive Open Online Course and its variants.
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Rescooped by Peter Mellow from Learning with MOOCs
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A review of MOOCs and their assessment tools

A review of MOOCs and their assessment tools | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

He starts with a taxonomy of MOOC instructional models, as follows:

cMOOCsxMOOCsBOOCs (a big open online course) – only one example, by a professor from Indiana University with a grant from Google, is given which appears to be a cross between an xMOOC and a cMOOC and had 500 participants.DOCCs (distributed open collaborative course): this involved 17 universities sharing and adapting the same basic MOOCLOOC (little open online course): as well as 15-20 tuition-paying campus-based students, the courses also allow a limited number of non-registered students to also take the course, but also paying a fee. Three examples are given, all from New England.MOORs (massive open online research): again just one example is given, from UC San Diego, which seems to be a mix of video-based lecturers and student research projects guided by the instructorsSPOCs (small, private, online courses): the example given is from Harvard Law School, which pre-selected 500 students from over 4,000 applicants, who take the same video-delivered lectures as on-campus students enrolled at HarvardSMOCs: (synchronous massive open online courses): live lectures from the University of Texas offered to campus-based students are also available synchronously to non-enrolled students for a fee of $550. Again, just one example.

 


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Rescooped by Peter Mellow from Open Educational Resources in Higher Education
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Learning Futures | Curtin Teaching and Learning

Learning Futures | Curtin Teaching and Learning | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

The Learning Futures team focuses on strategic innovations that advance the mission of the university. The team helps shape the future of learning and teaching at the university through human and technological capacity building and promotes continuous improvement using learning analytics.

 This team’s programs will influence and impact students, staff and the broader community by leading and managing a range of early stage innovation projects. These projects will range across formal and informal learning innovations, pathways and partnerships  and learning analytics. The primary benefits realized by the team are the university’s capability for scalable personalization and its international reputation as a leader through technology-enriched learning and teaching.

 

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Via Kim Flintoff
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Craig Patterson's comment, June 13, 2013 1:52 AM
Is this link working?
Kim Flintoff's comment, June 13, 2013 2:12 AM
The website was redesigned and we disappeared ... This scoop is simply a flag about who's curating... We didn't expect anyone wold ever want to visit us.....
Regis Elo's curator insight, January 13, 9:02 AM
LOVE #tecademics experience on line ....a matter of  learning and earning http://er972073.tcdmcs.com/ambassador
Rescooped by Peter Mellow from Learning with MOOCs
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SPOCs may provide what MOOCs can’t | University Business Magazine

It’s hard to follow higher education news these days without seeing a reference to MOOCs. The online learning platforms from edX, Coursera, Udacity, and others were launched to great fanfare over the last two years. Proponents praise them for their potential to change education, while critics chalk them up as more hype than hope.


To be sure, for all their promise, MOOCs also have their share of problems. For one thing, as has been documented in each of the popular platforms, the attrition rate is high. For the thousands of students that enroll in a MOOC, only a fraction will fulfill the requirements of the course.

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