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Massively MOOC
Examining the development of the Massive Open Online Course
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Rescooped by Peter Mellow from Learning with MOOCs
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This is not a post about MOOCs this is a post about learning - Digital scholarship blog

This is not a post about MOOCs this is a post about learning - Digital scholarship blog | Massively MOOC | Scoop.it
Back in Summer 2011 when I first began to notice the disruptive word 'digital' preceding the comfortable (though perhaps under-theorised) word 'humanities', the two together leading to capitalisation and the acronym DH, I was uncertain quite where...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Peter Mellow
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MOOCs and Pedagogy: Part 2

MOOCs and Pedagogy: Part 2 | Massively MOOC | Scoop.it
Hard as it is for me to keep up with the spread of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) in higher education and the sizable issues accompanying how they are organized, taught, and what students take...
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Audrey Watters Wrestles with MOOCs | Open Education | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Audrey Watters Wrestles with MOOCs | Open Education | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Massively MOOC | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.
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The pedagogical foundations of massive open online courses | David G. Glance, Martin Forsey & Miles Riley - First Monday

In 2011, the respective roles of higher education institutions and students worldwide were brought into question by the rise of the massive open online course (MOOC). MOOCs are defined by signature characteristics that include: lectures formatted as short videos combined with formative quizzes; automated assessment and/or peer and self–assessment and an online forum for peer support and discussion. Although not specifically designed to optimise learning, claims have been made that MOOCs are based on sound pedagogical foundations that are at the very least comparable with courses offered by universities in face–to–face mode. To validate this, we examined the literature for empirical evidence substantiating such claims. Although empirical evidence directly related to MOOCs was difficult to find, the evidence suggests that there is no reason to believe that MOOCs are any less effective a learning experience than their face–to–face counterparts. Indeed, in some aspects, they may actually improve learning outcomes.


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Maria Persson's comment, May 26, 2013 9:00 PM
Appreciate your comments Paulo - insightful and provokes further thought. Thanks for the comment.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, May 31, 2013 6:46 AM
Great comment Paulo!
Hein Holthuizen's curator insight, September 29, 2013 3:27 AM

A great outcome for those who don't like travelling (not me) and want to train/teach those who are in need of knowledge they are able to give.

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Learning as Performance: MOOC Pedagogy and On-ground Classes | Digital Pedagogy | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Learning as Performance: MOOC Pedagogy and On-ground Classes | Digital Pedagogy | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Massively MOOC | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.

 

If we apply the idea of performance-as-creation in a classroom environment, we go against the current trends of standardization and measurement that often distract attention from actual learning and place it instead on drills and test scores. When a student’s explicit goal is to earn a certain score on a certain test, the test becomes the student’s adversary. Learning becomes an act of competition in which the student -- young and inexperienced -- is pitted against the examination, often created by a team of “experts” in the name of instructional design. Endless assessment creates a school environment in which students are challenged to prove that they can outwit an exam. Learning, in this system, happens by accident or according to the strict expectations of the test.

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