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LA Daily News: Breaking News, Sports, Business, Entertainment & LA News

LA Daily News: Breaking News, Sports, Business, Entertainment & LA News | Mashup | Scoop.it
LA Daily News. Your local source for breaking news, sports, business, classifieds, and entertainment in LA.
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Masher - create free online video, photo and music mashups

Masher - create free online video, photo and music mashups | Mashup | Scoop.it

Online video editing, mash-ups, mashups, mix, mash, share, free content, video and photo mixing, best slideshows, free BBC video content.. Then add words, music and special effects.

 

An impressive alternative to Animoto.


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1 In 7 Americans Can't Read This Headline- And That Hasn't Changed In 10 Years | Huff Post

1 In 7 Americans Can't Read This Headline- And That Hasn't Changed In 10 Years | Huff Post | Mashup | Scoop.it

Sunday is International Literacy Day! We recommend taking the opportunity to curl up with with a warm cup of coffee, a comfy chair, and a favorite classic. Of course, this holiday is bittersweet - We know we'll be celebrating accordingly, but many Americans won't be able to do so.

 

According to a study conducted in late April by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Institute of Literacy, 32 million adults in the U.S. can't read. That's 14 percent of the population. 21 percent of adults in the U.S. read below a 5th grade level, and 19 percent of high school graduates can't read.

 

The current literacy rate isn't any better than it was 10 years ago. According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (completed most recently in 2003, and before that, in 1992), 14 percent of adult Americans demonstrated a "below basic" literacy level in 2003, and 29 percent exhibited a "basic" reading level.

 

We probably don't need to spell out the benefits of reading and writing for you. Economic security, access to health care, and the ability to actively participate in civic life all depend on a individual's ability to read.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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How to make ceramics that bend without breaking: Self-deploying medical devices?

How to make ceramics that bend without breaking: Self-deploying medical devices? | Mashup | Scoop.it
New materials could lead to actuators on a chip and self-deploying medical devices. Ceramics are not known for their flexibility: they tend to crack under stress.

 

The team has developed a way of making minuscule ceramic objects that are not only flexible, but also have a "memory" for shape: When bent and then heated, they return to their original shapes. The surprising discovery is reported this week in the journalScience, in a paper by MIT graduate student Alan Lai, professor Christopher Schuh, and two collaborators in Singapore.

 

Shape-memory materials, which can bend and then snap back to their original configurations in response to a temperature change, have been known since the 1950s, explains Schuh, the Danae and Vasilis Salapatas Professor of Metallurgy and head of MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering. "It's been known in metals, and some polymers," he says, "but not in ceramics."

 

In principle, the molecular structure of ceramics should make shape memory possible, he says -- but the materials' brittleness and propensity for cracking has been a hurdle. "The concept has been there, but it's never been realized," Schuh says. "That's why we were so excited."

 

The key to shape-memory ceramics, it turns out, was thinking small.

 

The team accomplished this in two key ways. First, they created tiny ceramic objects, invisible to the naked eye: "When you make things small, they are more resistant to cracking," Schuh says. Then, the researchers concentrated on making the individual crystal grains span the entire small-scale structure, removing the crystal-grain boundaries where cracks are most likely to occur.

Those tactics resulted in tiny samples of ceramic material -- samples with deformability equivalent to about 7 percent of their size. "Most things can only deform about 1 percent," Lai says, adding that normal ceramics can't even bend that much without cracking.

 

"Usually if you bend a ceramic by 1 percent, it will shatter," Schuh says. But these tiny filaments, with a diameter of just 1 micrometer -- one millionth of a meter -- can be bent by 7 to 8 percent repeatedly without any cracking, he says.

 

While a micrometer is pretty tiny by most standards, it's actually not so small in the world of nanotechnology. "It's large compared to a lot of what nanotech people work on," Lai says. As such, these materials could be important tools for those developing micro- and nanodevices, such as for biomedical applications. For example, shape-memory ceramics could be used as microactuators to trigger actions within such devices -- such as the release of drugs from tiny implants.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, FrancMoyano
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How to make ceramics that bend without breaking: Self-deploying medical devices?

How to make ceramics that bend without breaking: Self-deploying medical devices? | Mashup | Scoop.it
New materials could lead to actuators on a chip and self-deploying medical devices. Ceramics are not known for their flexibility: they tend to crack under stress.

 

The team has developed a way of making minuscule ceramic objects that are not only flexible, but also have a "memory" for shape: When bent and then heated, they return to their original shapes. The surprising discovery is reported this week in the journalScience, in a paper by MIT graduate student Alan Lai, professor Christopher Schuh, and two collaborators in Singapore.

 

Shape-memory materials, which can bend and then snap back to their original configurations in response to a temperature change, have been known since the 1950s, explains Schuh, the Danae and Vasilis Salapatas Professor of Metallurgy and head of MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering. "It's been known in metals, and some polymers," he says, "but not in ceramics."

 

In principle, the molecular structure of ceramics should make shape memory possible, he says -- but the materials' brittleness and propensity for cracking has been a hurdle. "The concept has been there, but it's never been realized," Schuh says. "That's why we were so excited."

 

The key to shape-memory ceramics, it turns out, was thinking small.

 

The team accomplished this in two key ways. First, they created tiny ceramic objects, invisible to the naked eye: "When you make things small, they are more resistant to cracking," Schuh says. Then, the researchers concentrated on making the individual crystal grains span the entire small-scale structure, removing the crystal-grain boundaries where cracks are most likely to occur.

Those tactics resulted in tiny samples of ceramic material -- samples with deformability equivalent to about 7 percent of their size. "Most things can only deform about 1 percent," Lai says, adding that normal ceramics can't even bend that much without cracking.

 

"Usually if you bend a ceramic by 1 percent, it will shatter," Schuh says. But these tiny filaments, with a diameter of just 1 micrometer -- one millionth of a meter -- can be bent by 7 to 8 percent repeatedly without any cracking, he says.

 

While a micrometer is pretty tiny by most standards, it's actually not so small in the world of nanotechnology. "It's large compared to a lot of what nanotech people work on," Lai says. As such, these materials could be important tools for those developing micro- and nanodevices, such as for biomedical applications. For example, shape-memory ceramics could be used as microactuators to trigger actions within such devices -- such as the release of drugs from tiny implants.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Lawrence Ripsher | Over this past week, I’ve been posting photos from...

Lawrence Ripsher | Over this past week, I’ve been posting photos from... | Mashup | Scoop.it

Over this past week, I’ve been posting photos from our trip up to Banff in late Aug. Here’s a single post with a compilation of my favorite 10 photos from the trip. Save for shots which have a bit of a human element (one my wife, the other my feet!) these are all landscapes. All photos were shot with the Fuji X-E1 and mostly the Fuji 14mm f2.8. Some were also with the 18-55mm kit lens (which I still adore) or the 35mm f1.4. 


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