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Masada Geography
Geography for the learners of Masada College, Sydney http://www.masadageo.weebly.com
Curated by Ryan Gill
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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 10:02 PM

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 5:09 PM
Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 10:51 AM

Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.

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Where the Hell is Matt?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 9, 2013 10:11 PM

I've seen other "Where the Hell is Matt" videos and this recent one is building on that tradition.  These videos show some fantastic international icons and people around the world.  Simultaneously, this video show the unique cultural elements seen around the world while showing the essential beauty of our common humanity.  Who wouldn't want to go to all the places that Matt has been? 


Tags: geo-inspiration, worldwide, folk culture.

GeoBlogs's curator insight, March 11, 2013 3:41 AM

Where can you send Matt ?

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Time Zones

Time Zones | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM

Coordinating a meeting across time zones can be confusion logistical task and one that people rarely can do off the top of their head or consulting some resources.  It is, however, fundamentally a geographic task.  Our friends at the Global Catastrophic Risk Institute put together this collection of 5 maps (and this time zone converter) to help global collaboration.

Louis Culotta's comment, February 27, 2013 3:16 PM
good info...I use a app on my phone most of the time for this info.
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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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Global cities of the future

Global cities of the future | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Explore the cities and emerging urban clusters that will drive dramatic growth and demographic changes over the next generation. A McKinsey Quarterly Economic Studies article.

 

In the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. That is reason enough to explore this global dataset with over 2,600 metropolitan areas. 


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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedomHealth-Healthy communities prosperEconomy-Green energy equals good businessEquality-Women ruleJustice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


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Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 8:24 AM

HDI

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
more...
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
more...
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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Earth from Above

Earth from Above | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpaste.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.