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Masada Geography
Geography for the learners of Masada College, Sydney http://www.masadageo.weebly.com
Curated by Ryan Gill
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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.

 

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Population Bracketology

Population Bracketology | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Try the Population Bracketology game from @uscensusbureau! Weekly data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau compares populations for US states and metro areas.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, March 20, 2013 8:34 AM

Although I've never been very good at brackets, I have a better shot with this one!  Neat way to engage students with population data!

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:51 AM

Try bracketology for geography while you're waiting for games to start!  :)

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 10, 9:15 PM

I got 52 on both, some surprises for me.

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The Permanence of Geography

The Permanence of Geography | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
The current rise or durability of the economies of the Global South do not signal that economic geography does not matter, but that current investment has simply shifted.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 16, 2013 12:23 PM

In an era where globalization has rendered distances a minor barrier to diffusion, some have erroneously concluded that geography is no longer relevant to economic development and urban planning.  Nothing could be farther from the truth, but that doesn't mean that the 'old rules' of space and place aren't be re-written.  This is a nice article that discusses the continued importance of spatial thinking and geography for urban planning.


Tags: urban, planning economic, urbanism, globalization, unit 7 cities.

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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 3:36 PM

World cities and megacities - Presently , the mega cities of the world have to have a population of at least 10,000. Many cities are very near the minimum to be considered a mega city, but are not quite there. By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, is estimated to be home to 29 megacities.

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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Geography of Aspiration

Geography of Aspiration | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Try to replicate it with development schemes all you want, but you're overlooking what makes New York City—and other places of ambition—so great.

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Dean Haakenson's comment, June 6, 2013 11:30 AM
Very cool.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:31 PM

I think that historical opportunity is what makes NYC so great... well, great as implied by the writers of this article.  Having a good history, it is only natural that it would become something so popular and draw the ambitious to it.  In contrast, a newly formed colony of humans on Mars would be potentially better- because in this hypothetical/planned colony, people would be able to benefit from the fact that they are building from the ground up, from scratch, and with the knowledge of other development schemes/trends that occurred elsewhere.  This could entirely circumvent all ill aspects of society... Sometimes to create, one must first destroy... perhaps NYC should be rebuilt to eliminate problems, before humans move on to other worlds?  I thought NY was a bit of a mess when I drove through with my cousin.  The graffiti was gorgeous, but the filth and traffic were quite triumphant, and it is not a place where my ambition would lead me.  I think true talent will be found, regardless of this subliminal advertisment brought about by the article endorsing NYC as a 'place of ambition.'  Not all of us can go to these 'meccas' of talent... but it doesn't mean we are any less extravagent as life forms.  I would ask if most people would want to make it big in places like that, or if they would rather be happier, elsewhere.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:53 PM

This reminds me of the production method idea you taught us where even though you may be able to produce 2 products better than a third world country it is for the best if you have them do what they excel at while you do your thing. (You made a lebron james reference in class). the reason why im connecting this is because every city has its own thing to offer with San fran being the arts portland with the mom and pop shops and new york with the enterainment. if you can excel at what you do then your city can blossom.

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

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Global cities of the future

Global cities of the future | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Explore the cities and emerging urban clusters that will drive dramatic growth and demographic changes over the next generation. A McKinsey Quarterly Economic Studies article.

 

In the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. That is reason enough to explore this global dataset with over 2,600 metropolitan areas. 


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How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.

 

The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."

 

Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.


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Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 7:56 AM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.