Masada Geography
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Masada Geography
Geography for the learners of Masada College, Sydney http://www.masadageo.weebly.com
Curated by Ryan Gill
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Where North Korea wants to Attack!

From the NY Times: "North Korea, which seemed to be running out of tubs to thump, found a new target for its ire in a propaganda video released Saturday on Uriminzokkiri, a government Web site.

To a soundtrack of fervent synthesizers and inspirational light rock, the video announces that North Korea will aim nuclear weapons (that it may, or may not, be able to launch) at Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Honolulu and… Colorado Springs, Co.

The unorthodox move — apparently an attempt to target the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or Norad, and the United States Air Force Academy — is compounded by the fact that Pyongyang does not quite know where the city is. The map shown in the video places it somewhere in Louisiana."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:35 PM

We watched this video in class and its just absurd. North Korea has no idea what they are doing and what are they going to attack? Nuclear weapons are no joke but this video is pretty funny.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:24 PM

North Korea uses propaganda videos in order to convince its citizens that they are in fact, the biggest and baddest. This video is supposed to show North Koreans that they should not fear the United States because they (might?) have nuclear missiles that can potentially reach American soil, specifically DC, Los Angeles, Hawaii, and Colorado Springs (though they depict Norad as being in Louisiana, not Colorado). North Korea's policies regarding outside media keep the people dependent on the government as a source of information. While the United States is quite sure that North Korea cannot in fact reach the United States, the idea is still unnerving. As military technologies develop, physical geography may no longer be a form of defense, 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 8:54 AM

Of course it is going to be scary when you watch a video of missiles be launched towards your country.  That's simply just the surface of things, but any educated person knows that you need to put everything and anything into the proper context.  So, in order to get a true measure of this videos legitimacy you need to analyze a few areas.

 

First off, the video is in Korean, so I personally do not know what they are saying which makes me hesitant to overreact. There is a visual I see but sometimes pictures tell a whole different story than the actual situation.  Secondly, this could be simply propaganda to invoke confidence in its citizens.  Just like every government on the face of the earth, they might be just trying to convince its people that they are safe due to their military mite and the capability of defending their homeland.  Lastly, what type of weight would I put on a source that is inaccurate.  They clearly mislabel Colorado Springs.  If this attack was legitimately imminent don't you think they would have things accurate down to the millimeter?????  

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:25 PM

I actually feel this is a great way to teach students, we just aren’t used to it in America.  The students who already know what they’re doing should be helping those who struggle.  When we boast about how well someone does at something, it can actually discourage the student who doesn’t understand.  It is definitely a tricky situation to be in, but I can understand why.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:54 AM

This video lays out them main difference between educational theory in the west, and educational theory in the east. In the west, we place value on a student achieving the right answer. Right Answers eventually lead to high grades. All classes eventually boil down to the grade given. In reality, it is all that most parents, teachers and students care about. In the east knowledge is measured through the work that goes in to getting the correct answer. Mistakes are seen as a natural outcome of hard work. They are not discouraged as they are in western education.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 15, 2015 2:16 PM

the difference in mentality is amazing as described in this article the difference in perception of struggling students in america and Asian countries is staggering and i think that our country has been so concerned for so long with only the best succeeding that it needs to be fixed, i know that we have taken steps int he right direction with different government programs which is promising and hopefully this development will continue

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China profile

China profile | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

China is simply to important to ignore and this profile is a good primer for students unfamiliar with the East Asian country to get caught up to speed. 


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Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 12:23 PM
China has a huge population but is has a horrible life style. It
Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 12:25 PM
China has a huge population but it has a horrible life style. It's really bad when people have to protest for human rights. Even though their economy has boosted their pollution problems are unexceptable.
Joel Roberts's comment, May 3, 2013 2:37 PM
China's huge population growth isn't necessarily such a good thing because most of the new population is males because parents want males so they can have more workers after they get married but its harder to get married because there is less and less girls in China's population.