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Masada Geography
Geography for the learners of Masada College, Sydney http://www.masadageo.weebly.com
Curated by Ryan Gill
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Solar Roadways


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Gabriel Pizarro Dasso's curator insight, June 11, 12:15 PM

creo que es al menos el mejor invento de diseño hasta hoy en día 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 13, 6:26 AM

What an interesting idea. Power of the future?

Michelle Fulton's curator insight, June 17, 5:20 PM

Some really interesting discussions could be held around this video-Geographically, Scientifically, Technologically, Environmentally, Creatively and Critically. 

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 11:44 AM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 6:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 6:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 4:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 11:44 AM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

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The Permanence of Geography

The Permanence of Geography | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
The current rise or durability of the economies of the Global South do not signal that economic geography does not matter, but that current investment has simply shifted.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 16, 2013 9:23 AM

In an era where globalization has rendered distances a minor barrier to diffusion, some have erroneously concluded that geography is no longer relevant to economic development and urban planning.  Nothing could be farther from the truth, but that doesn't mean that the 'old rules' of space and place aren't be re-written.  This is a nice article that discusses the continued importance of spatial thinking and geography for urban planning.


Tags: urban, planning economic, urbanism, globalization, unit 7 cities.