Masada Geography
Follow
Find tag "images"
414 views | +0 today
Masada Geography
Geography for the learners of Masada College, Sydney http://www.masadageo.weebly.com
Curated by Ryan Gill
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lola Ripollés's curator insight, June 15, 8:58 AM

Amazing.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:33 AM

unit 1

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Roman Mirando's curator insight, September 10, 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Robert Hardy Simpkins's curator insight, September 10, 9:29 AM

The fact that in just 86 years we will have 15 billion people in our world is a very scary thought.will we have enough resources to account for all the people on Earth. Will there be multiple diseases killing people off. Our population needs to be controlled.

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How are satellite images different from photographs?

How are satellite images different from photographs? | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

"Satellites acquire images in black and white, so how is it possible to create the beautiful color images that we see on television, in magazines, and on the internet? Computers provide us with the answer.

Images created using different bands (or wavelengths) have different contrast (light and dark areas). Computers make it possible to assign 'false color' to these black and white images. The three primary colors of light are red, green, and blue. Computer screens can display an image in three different bands at a time, by using a different primary color for each band. When we combine these three images we get a 'false color image.'

Find tutorials and links to free compositing programs here."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 16, 2013 9:11 AM

Tags: remote sensing, imagesgeospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Ken Halpern's comment, March 1, 2013 1:23 PM
Very interesting to see how the process works. This is very helpful when trying to get a point across.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:59 PM
The Electromagnetic scale always confused me in High School! Hahaha. I also didn't know that satellites only take pictures in black and white.
Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | Masada Geography | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jennifer Brown's curator insight, December 10, 6:37 PM

Lake Hillier seems like one of those bucket list must see types of places. I would however not swim in it since no one know what the cause is. Its a horror movie waiting to happen!

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 11:44 PM

The pink lake, Lake Hillier,  located in Western Australia is stunning. The aerial view of the lake makes the lake seem unreal that is was is fascinating. What gives the lake its pink color is a mystery, but it may be from bacteria, but it shows how some places in the world are affected differently than others and it produces remarkable results.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Great Places

Great Places | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

Hawaii, Kauai Island...where they shot the Jurassic Park...

 

Sometimes we all want to see a fabulously gorgeous physical landscape and marvel at the beauty that is in this world.  For some other spectacular images, here is a great collection of images (without much geographic specificity though).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 6:23 PM

Here is a collection of imagines that encapsulate different landscapes and provokes different emotions. It is always nice to see pictures from places other than where you come from; the marvels of the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 10:41 AM

All these scoops are full of beautiful landscapes and places for tourists to visit. With Jurassic Park being such a big part of social culture and history, these landscapes are definitely worth venturing to. Hawaii is one of the biggest tourist and vacation spots in general. For all those who are able to travel there, they should invest in taking a trip to Kauai as well.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 11:49 PM

These landscapes are amazing, seeing how different many of these place are and yet all beautiful, shows how the physical landscapes of the world are so diverse.

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

EARTH Masterpieces

The natural landscapes shown as captured by satellite imagery is as beautiful as anything artists have ever created.  Some of the colors shown in the video may seem otherworldy.  Most of those color anomalies are due to the fact that remotely sensed images have more information in them than just what we see in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.  Some of these images are processed to show different bands so we can visually interpret data such as what is in the near infra-red band, skewing the color palette.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:09 AM

CD 1: The different types of landscapes and their distinctive landform features.

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

"The edge of the 4,000 square foot residence on Overlook Court was dangling about 75 feet above the rocky shoreline of Lake Whitney after part it it had already broken off."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 13, 10:00 PM

Natural hazards

YEC Geo's curator insight, June 14, 1:10 PM

In the lower map, the location of the house is marked by a yellow pushpin inside the solid red square.  Some geological background--this poor house has the misfortune to apparently lie directly upon the contact between two carbonate formations (marked by the white dotted line), and to also be on the erosive edge of a bend in the river. Both factors probably contributed to the demise of this particular home, which was eventually set on fire: https://tinyurl.com/nw7mfd2

 

 

One thing to notice is how straight the cliff edge is upon which the house is built.  Knowing that, I'd have to say that if I had a house located on the straight cliff edges within the dotted red squares I've made on the map, I'd be worried.

 

You can read about the geology of Texas here:

https://tinyurl.com/lrcp9yj

 

Image credit here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/House-on-Lake-Whitney-Cliff-Falling-Into-Lake-262718721.html?partner=nbcnews

Massimo Di Duca's curator insight, June 15, 12:13 PM

E la prospezione geologica da presentare al Comune? Era prevista nel PRG del comune? Esisteva un VIA?

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Education Around the World

Education Around the World | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

Flag Food

Flag Food | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

Mark Slusher's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:46 AM

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
oliviersc's comment, November 13, 2012 5:50 PM
Shared in this Revue : Cheesecake et bonnets pour tenir chaud = http://blogoliviersc.org/?p=5974
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:53 AM

Some of the best looking images I have ever seen! The picture I found most facinating was the "Door To Hell". The Door to Hell is filled with natural gas. "In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today." The fire started in 1971 and it is still burning today!? CRAZY

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:05 AM

Sometimes you really can't tell whether a picture is real or not. How do landscapes like this form on their own? In this particular picture, the cause of a drilling rig has left a giant hole. The fire is still burning and has left the world to see a beautiful, unnatural landscape.

Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth from Above

Earth from Above | Masada Geography | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpaste.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.
Rescooped by Ryan Gill from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

EARTH Masterpieces

The natural landscapes shown as captured by satellite imagery is as beautiful as anything artists have ever created.  Some of the colors shown in the video may seem otherworldy.  Most of those color anomalies are due to the fact that remotely sensed images have more information in them than just what we see in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.  Some of these images are processed to show different bands so we can visually interpret data such as what is in the near infra-red band, skewing the color palette.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:09 AM

CD 1: The different types of landscapes and their distinctive landform features.