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How Online Dating Sites Use Data to Find 'The One'

How Online Dating Sites Use Data to Find 'The One' | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

This article details how data is used by online dating platforms to match members though social listening & observing ethnography. Three dating platforms with unique algorithms but similar objectives are described: Match.com & HowAboutWe observes member behaviors and patterns, while Coffee Meets Bagel uses mainly social listening and Facebook. Interestingly, Match.com found that consumers break their own rules about what they want in a relationship; for example, a woman would put money as an important factor, yet her social media activity would show her continually interacting with the musician or artist.

 

Evidently, consumer data paired with ethnography is important to the success of these dating sites. Big data is important for determining consumer preferences, whereas ethnography is incorporated through social elements and user inputs. Sites allow behavior to be easily observed, giving us great insights; for instance, having at least 1 mutual friend increased the probability of two people connecting by 37%.

 

When companies combine data and consumers’ social habits, they are able to better meet needs and preferences. This points to the significance of monitoring the type and accuracy of data collected to make credible matches because this methodology limits sites to only observing online behavior.

 

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The Making of Titan's Skinn

The Making of Titan's Skinn | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

"The brand did ethnography studies on Indian men and women as well to understand how they used their perfumes, stored them, and used them for what occasions."

 

Insight: Titan perfumes did a deep study about the Indian culture in order to understand better this society, in order to make the "best" perfume possible adapted to them and their lifestyles. The company carried out this research because Indian market has huge differences with European one, in which they already have a position.

 

It caught my attention easily, at first because we also talked about Indian market in class the other day, but mostly for the genius idea. 

This research helped the company understand better the market, the smells Indians prefer and what do they use them for; and to realize how less developed, compared to others, is the Indian market.

Indeed, the key point that differences these perfumes from the others is the percentage of fragrance strength. They discovered that Indians wanted perfumes to simply last longer because of the high temperatures they are exposed to, that make the perfume disappear as the day passes. The thing is that this key point could be found by anyone, even without going to India, it is well known that India has high temperatures. 

Again, consumer ethnography was the tool, which made the key competitive advantage possible. 

 

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Is Your Company Listening To Social-Media Chatter For All The Wrong Reasons?

Is Your Company Listening To Social-Media Chatter For All The Wrong Reasons? | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

This article analyzes the importance of recognizing where the value in social listening lies, and how an unstructured social media monitoring system may, in fact, be a liability. Erich Joachimsthaler uses corporate instances to exemplify how merely gathering metrics is effective if a business is content reacting to market trends; however, in order to proactively drive growth, it is imperative that organizations understand the context of their monitoring.

 

Joachimsthaler provides thought-provoking suggestions on how corporations should utilize social listening in order to strike influential “touchpoints” with their consumers. An example is BMW’s launch of the 3i electric car and the over-arching social media system that makes servicing the car simple for owners. It provides value to the company, also, by tracking uses and challenges drivers face, providing BMW the opportunity to constantly enhance the driving experience.

 

The suggestion that companies should reduce how often they generate data reports is surprising considering that multi-national organizations typically do not cease operations. By constantly searching for statistics that will drive growth (such as demographic trends and brand associations) and focusing assets on them, organizations can use social listening effectively to recognize and demonstrate their differentiating factors, making it a worthy investment.

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How Social Data Influenced Hyatt to Pull Part of Campaign Days Before Launch

How Social Data Influenced Hyatt to Pull Part of Campaign Days Before Launch | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

This article shows how Sparks and Honey (An agency specialized in social media analysis) goes beyond the concept of social listening. The company's final goal is to help their customers to synchronize their brands with culture. To do so they use an innovative process that involves tracking every “hot” issue in the media -not only information related to the brand-, predictive analysis to estimate the potential impact of a trend and everyday meetings to share worker’s findings.

 

The Sparks and Honey paradigm provides their customer with immediate and relevant data allowing them to plan in accordance to nowadays’ trends. There are some examples of that concept at the very first paragraph of the article and in the last ones. The former is about plugging on a campaign and the latter is just a Facebook post that links the discovery of new planets (a hot topic at that time) with a customer’s product.

 

The differentiated social listening service offer by Sparks and Honey could be considered as the agency’s main competitive advantage. To achieve such differentiation Sparks and Honey just does its best to help businesses align themselves with the current environment by identifying hot patterns that might cause significant shifts in their business and consumers. So by using this methodology they allow companies to operate hand in hand with culture in real-time, to reach their customers easily, to connect better with them through the updated content of their ads, tweets and Facebook posts and to have a relevant impact on consumers.

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Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, September 20, 2013 7:46 PM
Comm332: You will notice that Alba has submitted this post again. She was brave and jumped head in to this assignment and was the first to submit. Thank you, Alba. Going first comes with a privilege that you get a second chance. If you compare the two scoopt by Alba (about the same topic), you will notice that they are slightly different. This one here is an improvement over the first one further below. It earns in between 4-5 points, while the first one below would have been more towards the 2-3 points level. This has mainly to do with the last paragraph. Alba does a much better job here in giving great insights into what makes the approach by Sparks and Honey special and useful. Well done, Alba! (And no, you can't ask for another chance if you are unhappy with your grade. That's a privilege for the very early.)
Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, September 23, 2013 9:30 AM
However, this submission is too long (252 words)
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Columbus, Ohio: Test market of the U.S.A.

Columbus, Ohio: Test market of the U.S.A. | Marketing Research | Scoop.it
The Midwestern city gives companies exactly what they want: A cross-section of the American public on which to test market their products
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Joachim Scholz, PhD's curator insight, September 17, 2013 10:21 PM

If you can ignore the over-the-top excitement displayed by the CBS "journalist", this video gives some good insights on how companies try out new product ideas and concepts in a test market... in Columbus, Ohio

Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
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How Bin Laden News Exploded on Twitter: A Visualization

How Bin Laden News Exploded on Twitter: A Visualization | Marketing Research | Scoop.it
By now it's common knowledge that the news of Osama Bin Laden's death broke on Twitter. Donald Rumsfeld's Chief of Staff, the fresh-faced Keith Urbahn, was the first credible so...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

How does Twitter go along with the old Katz and Lazarfeld Two-Step Flow Model of Social Influence? On the one hand, Twitter democratices the landscape and allows people to influence each other, without being a "gate keeper". On the other hand, influence is still a heterogenously distributed property, and some people have a louder voice than others on twitter.

 

This fascinating example of twitter analysis / social listening shows that trustworthiness can be more important on twitter than how many people follow you or how much you tweet. The bio of a governance insider (with only a "few" followers) was convincing enough that his tweet of bin Laden's death was retweeted by many of his 1000 followers. The other big impact on the social web was a reporter at the New York Times - with more followers, but somehow less of an impact.

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Inside Gatorade’s Social Media Command Center

Inside Gatorade’s Social Media Command Center | Marketing Research | Scoop.it
In the realm of marketing, Gatorade is probably best known for splashy commercials featuring some of the world’s most famous athletes. However, a new effort behind the scenes of...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

This interview details Gatorade's "Mission Control Center" that is used to listen, create dialogue and measure the effectiveness of campaigns. Mission Control influences marketing communications, for example by providing Gatorade followers with a full version of a song used in a commercial after it has been heavily discussed in social media. 

 

The video in this article provides a nice overview, and it is worth pausing it at 55 seconds to see what metrics Gatorade monitors: Beside insights related to their own brand (online discussions, social media outreach, brand attitudes), Gatorade also monitors the sports landscape. This points to the foundational insights that it is not enough to only consider your own brand, but to be closely connected to broader social trends and events. 

 

Additionally, Gatorade might want to track weather events, such as heat waves, for finding additional opportunities to engage consumers. Sending a coupon to an (influential) twitter user who complains about his AC breaking down in the middle of a heat wave would be a great consumer engagement; however, it also demonstrates that the instant interactions in social media might be most beneficial when consumers have instant access to a company’s goods.

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Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, September 20, 2013 7:48 PM
Comm332: This would be a 5 point post. Many of my other posts would not warrant five points (I am a bad student), so be sure to use the right post as benchmarks. See also Alba's second post about How Social Data Influenced Hyatt...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, September 20, 2013 7:49 PM
and my comment to it
Suggested by Nikki Baumgartner
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How Marketing at P&G Takes Cues From an Election Campaign

How Marketing at P&G Takes Cues From an Election Campaign | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

This article explores P&G’s approach to social media listening, comparing the company’s real-time response rate to the operations of an election campaign. For example, by monitoring trending topics on social media platforms, the Tide Newsdesk was able to quickly respond to a jet-fuel spill at a NASCAR race. Just hours later, the team had created social-media content centred on the spill and Tide became a number two trending Twitter topic.

 

Companies that sell “every-day” goods (like Tide detergent) especially have a challenge in getting consumers emotionally connected to their brands. Social media listening helps to overcome this challenge by integrating products into consumers’ most important memories and events.

 

The article illustrates that the Newsdesk approach has not always yielded success, citing an example from the Pantene product division. However, it is important to note that with this form of marketing the cost of failure is much lower than it would be with more traditional methods. That is because the rate at which a company can act and react is much faster, and the likelihood of a new opportunity presenting itself is greater.  Social media listening brings with it a new risk mindset with the potential of even richer rewards.

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Nikki Baumgartner's comment, September 25, 2013 9:55 PM
For anyone who is interested in seeing the application of P&G's Tide Newsdesk: http://www.digitaslbi.com/cases/global/pg/ (Be sure to change to HD!)
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How Kraft Foods Listens To Social Media -- InformationWeek

How Kraft Foods Listens To Social Media -- InformationWeek | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

This article discusses the product insights that Paul Banas, a Senior Category Insights Manager of Kraft’s Oscar Mayer brand, gains through social media analytics. Banas has found that social media allows the brand to predict long-term trends in consumer behavior and gain invaluable insights into consumer perceptions of the Oscar Mayer brand.

 

Social listening has influenced Oscar Mayer’s Marketing Mix in a major way. It has revolutionized the way they conduct product research. They no longer rely on traditional forms of research, like focus groups and survey panels. Rather, Oscar Mayer tracks conversations about their product on social media, allowing them to gain a deeper understanding of consumer needs. In the article, Banas reveals that Kraft Foods has even created new products in response to their findings from social media. These products have yet to be released.

 

Currently, Banas works mainly with social media monitoring firm, MotiveQuest. However, he finds it difficult to determine if such investments translate into sales.  One way that Banas can track his social media ROI is by analyzing patterns in Oscar Mayer’s sales against the amount of his investments in social media initiatives. If there is a positive relationship, then he’s doing the right thing! 

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Olapic Brings The Persuasive Power of User-Generated Imagery to E-Commerce - BoF - The Business of Fashion

Olapic Brings The Persuasive Power of User-Generated Imagery to E-Commerce - BoF - The Business of Fashion | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

This article details the concept of Olapic, an online startup that compiles user-generated imagery to help drive sales for e-commerce sites. Olapic directly links photos from social platforms to online retailers, which would otherwise be lost on the Internet. In addition, their analytics allow clients to quantify how many sales each image helps to drive as well as determine conversion rates.

 

Despite a simple concept, the landscape of insights (engagement, brand monitoring, consumer attitudes) that can be gathered from each company is infinite. Furthermore, the importance of being well versed in pop culture events and trends is highlighted by Olapic’s capability of tracking campaigns (ex: Heidi Klum for New Balance) with certain hashtags.

 

To suggest next steps for Olapic, because of the notable shift in consumers’ behavior from in-store to online shopping habits recently, it would be beneficial to see whether specific items (ex: Nike shoes vs. Nike fuel band) generate more engagement and sales over others. Also, rather than limiting clients to the area of fashion, tapping into other markets such as home décor or beauty will provide insights that showcase which industries are most prevalent on social engagement platforms.

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Marilyn Monroe’s Star Still Shines in Ad Campaigns

Marilyn Monroe’s Star Still Shines in Ad Campaigns | Marketing Research | Scoop.it
More than 50 years after her death, Marilyn Monroe still attracts attention and sales.
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How Social Data Influenced Hyatt to Pull Part of Campaign Days Before Launch

How Social Data Influenced Hyatt to Pull Part of Campaign Days Before Launch | Marketing Research | Scoop.it

This article shows how Sparks and Honey (An agency specialized in social media analysis) goes beyond the concept of social listening. The company's final goal is to help their customers to synchronize their brands with culture. To do so they use an innovative process that involves tracking every “hot” issue in the media -not only information related to the brand-, predictive analysis to estimate the potential impact of a trend and everyday meetings to share worker’s findings.

 

The Sparks and Honey paradigm provides their customer with immediate and relevant data allowing them to plan in accordance to the nowadays’ trends. There are some examples of that concept at the very first paragraph and in the last ones. The former is about pluging on a campaign and the latter is just a Facebook post that links the discovery of new planets (a hot topic at that time) with a customer’s product.

 

Hence it can be claimed that the greatness of this real-time methodology lies on the speed and the content of the search rather than on the consumer’s opinion of certain brand analysis. Thus this extensive social listening might only be request by companies that want to be active in a continuous basis on the Internet.

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Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, September 17, 2013 7:55 PM
Nice article. And take the time to watch the (rather unrelated) video to get your hope in humanity's future restored :)
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How Companies Learn Your Secrets

How Companies Learn Your Secrets | Marketing Research | Scoop.it
Your shopping habits reveal even the most personal information — like when you’re going to have a baby.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

This is a great article detailing different ways how companies do marketing research in practice - with astonishing results! The first part of the article describes how Target engages in some data mining of consumer habits in order to figure out who of their customers are in an early stage of their pregnancy. The idea is to capture these consumers early, while they are forming new habits. 

 

While this is a great example of using secondary data, the article later discusses how P&G employed qualititative research methods (lead by a Harvard Business School professor - Susan Fournier, is that you?) to solve a problem for Febreze's. In their first campaign, P&G addressed people directly about the bad smells in their environment. This didn't work. From the article:

 

"The reason Febreze wasn’t selling, the marketers realized, was that people couldn’t detect most of the bad smells in their lives. If you live with nine cats, you become desensitized to their scents. If you smoke cigarettes, eventually you don’t smell smoke anymore. Even the strongest odors fade with constant exposure. That’s why Febreze was a failure. The product’s cue — the bad smells that were supposed to trigger daily use — was hidden from the people who needed it the most. And Febreze’s reward (an odorless home) was meaningless to someone who couldn’t smell offensive scents in the first place.

 

P.& G. employed a Harvard Business School professor to analyze Febreze’s ad campaigns. They collected hours of footage of people cleaning their homes and watched tape after tape, looking for clues that might help them connect Febreze to people’s daily habits. When that didn’t reveal anything, they went into the field and conducted more interviews. A breakthrough came when they visited a woman in a suburb near Scottsdale, Ariz., who was in her 40s with four children. Her house was clean, though not compulsively tidy, and didn’t appear to have any odor problems; there were no pets or smokers. To the surprise of everyone, she loved Febreze."

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Lessons from New Product Launches--Cell Zone to iPad

Joan Schneider and Julie Hall of Schneider Associates, coauthors of the HBR article "Why Most Product Launches Fail," explain how to attract and maintain con...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

In this interview with Harvard Business Review, product launch experts Schneider and Hall discuss what makes a product launch successful, and what are the trapfalls to avoid. There are several implications for Marketing Research in this interview. For example, one thing Schneider and Hall emphasize (around 4:30) is to monitor trends. In their example, a product to allow people to have private cell-phone conversation (cell zone) should have paid more attention to the rising trend of texting. Back in the day, texting was for kids, but as kids grew into adults, the cell zone had lost mass appeal before it even took off. Another important aspect for launching successful products is to have a market (around 8:00). While this is an obvious statement, the Marketing Research implication here is that with social media it has become easier to gauge the market, to see whether there is an interest early on.

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