Marketing in Motion
17.6K views | +4 today
Follow
Marketing in Motion
Marketing practice is rapidly changing. This topic explores the latest trends in marketing communications, digital and mobile marketing, social media, community / tribal marketing and value co-creation.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

Six Tips for Executing a Successful Augmented Reality Campaign

Six Tips for Executing a Successful Augmented Reality Campaign | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Marketing Strategy - Executing an innovative and successful augmented reality (AR) marketing campaign doesn't have to be complicated. For retail marketers considering experimenting with AR, here are a few simple tips to keep ...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Augmented Reality is for many marketers the next big thing, as it allows brands to engage customers and to build relationships with them in the space their customers are actually living, not in some online world. And with wearable computers becoming a reality more and more, the AR trend might finally take off soon.

 

This article gives a few ideas of what to keep in mind while designing AR:

 

1. Make it relevant

2. Create engaging content

3. Understand where users are interacting with content

4. Include a clear call to action

5. Integrate with other marketing tools

 

Looking over this list, the first thing that comes to my mind is that the same list would also be true for TV ads, radio ads, spokespersons, social media campaigns, and so on. So where is the groundbreaking potential of AR? As AR is an inherently localized and place-based technology, it is more likely that AR-savvy marketers will succeed when they allow consumers to connect with their physical-spatial-material environment, similarly to how social media-savvy marketers succeed by allowing consumers to connect with their social environment. The five points listed above are all well and good, but we have to direct our attention to the AR killer feature that is not part of this list.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Jaeik Bae
Scoop.it!

Why Google paid $3.2 billion for thermostat startup Nest

Why Google paid $3.2 billion for thermostat startup Nest | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

“Google is moving into your home”

 

Google has recently announced that it was acquiring Nest, company that makes smart smoke alarms and thermostats. Google’s acquisition of Nest showed their interest for emerging market of “connected-home”. The idea behind the connected home is to connect all appliances to the internet so that they can be controlled from afar using either mobile devices or through internet. Google wants to make a bigger presence in the home by introducing their own line of digital appliances and their start point is smart thermostat and smoke detector.

 

You might be thinking what does connected-home has to do with marketing; for advertising companies such as Google, connected-devices can help companies gather better information about how consumers interact with household appliances. By using the data about people’s habits while they are at home, companies would be able to make better targeted ads. This is a common online marketing practice, where marketers track people’s online behaviours to develop and deliver specific ads based on their behaviours; however, this was only limited to people’s internet behaviour; now, by using connected-devices, marketing companies can virtually track users’ every move from how they use TV, phone, and even the room temperature. Gaining insights about customers is crucial in marketing. Up until now collecting data was expensive and timely; however, with connected-devices, companies can collect better data at lower cost in less time. Data collected by connected-devices can help marketing companies build better customer relationship management (CRM) so that companies can better pinpoint and target customers more effectively.  

 

To sum up, connected-devices can be a creative and innovative way to collect consumer insights that can help marketers better understand consumer's behaviour and habits, which can lead to developing a better ads that can attract and encouraging consumers to make the purchase.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD from Marketing Trends
Scoop.it!

Good data: The secret ingredient to good analytics

Good data: The secret ingredient to good analytics | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Welcome to the CMA Blog. All marketing-related topics are fair game: branding, strategy, online, offline, marketing trends, technology, direct marketing, market research...and more.

Via Karl Michaud
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Karl Michaud

 

In Marketing: An Introduction, Gary Armstrong states, “Digital technology has also brought a new wave of communication, advertising, and relationship-building tools . . .” – but the results are only reliable as the databases. Jan Kestle’s, Good data: The secret ingredient to good analytics, published on-line by the Canadian Marketing Association delves into the perils of using social media tools and other high tech solutions for marketing when the quality of the database is suspect.


Kestle questions the data from the National Household Survey, which has replaced the mandatory long-form census form. Kestle argues that this data that marketers rely upon has gaps and biases, which marginalizes the data for determining target audiences - this allows Kestle to pitch her company and existing product lines at Environics Analytics. She cites the old adage – garbage in, garbage out, in that regardless of the complexity and definition in any particular marketing model, if the baseline data is flawed, then so too are any generated results.


Marketing: An Introduction focuses on defining the marketing process, understanding the marketplace, and designing a marketing strategy. Kestle is correct in concluding, “. . . the need for quality data will render marketing analytics worthless—no matter how sexy the software or vibrant the visualization tools.” Her article underscores the importance that the data that marketers use to devise their strategies must be current and relevant if their models are to predict the desired outcome, “... to create value for customers and to capture value from customers …” (Armstrong Page 1).


Too often we use models for analysis without truly understanding the inherent risks and weaknesses of the model – flash over substance. Market segmentation and targeting will only succeed if not only the model employed is relevant, but also the underlying data is accurate.

more...
Karl Michaud's curator insight, January 23, 2014 12:56 PM

In Marketing:  An Introduction, Gary Armstrong states, “Digital technology has also brought a new wave of communication, advertising, and relationship-building tools . . .” – but the results are only reliable as the databases.  Jan Kestle’s, Good data: The secret ingredient to good analytics, published on-line by the Canadian Marketing Association delves into the perils of using social media tools and other high tech solutions for marketing when the quality of the database is suspect. 

Kestle questions the data from the National Household Survey, which has replaced the mandatory long-form census form.   Kestle argues that this data that marketers rely upon has gaps and biases, which marginalizes the data for determining target audiences - this allows Kestle to pitch her company and existing product lines at Environics Analytics.  She cites the old adage – garbage in, garbage out, in that regardless of the complexity and definition in any particular marketing model, if the baseline data is flawed, then so too are any generated results.

Marketing:  An Introduction focuses on defining the marketing process, understanding the marketplace, and designing a marketing strategy.  Kestle is correct in concluding, “. . . the need for quality data will render marketing analytics worthless—no matter how sexy the software or vibrant the visualization tools.”  Her article underscores the importance that the data that marketers use to devise their strategies must be current and relevant if their models are to predict the desired outcome, “... to create value for customers and to capture value from customers …” (Armstrong Page 1).

Too often we use models for analysis without truly understanding the inherent risks and weaknesses of the model – flash over substance.  Market segmentation and targeting will only succeed if not only the model employed is relevant, but also the underlying data is accurate.

Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

Lingerie Brand Aerie Isn't Retouching Its Models With Photoshop For Its New Ad Campaign

Lingerie Brand Aerie Isn't Retouching Its Models With Photoshop For Its New Ad Campaign | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Hooray!
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

In the wake of the Abercrombie & Fitch controversy, American Eagle's Aerie lingerie brand is going down the Dove way of real beauty. In its latest campaign, Aerie does not photoshop its models and instead goes with a "real beauty" theme. A smart move for sure to differentiate itself from its competitors, which are criticized for their overall sexual appeal (A&F) and for promoting unrealistic body types (Victoria Secret).

 

Aerie hopes that this new move will not only earn them goodwill from customers, but that their customers reward them with word-of-mouth as well. In order to facilitate engagement, Aerie suggests a hastag to use on instragram and twitter to be featured on their main page. Pretty standard engagement strategy, and I think the real question will lie in whether their target audience will find this move genuine, or whether the dominant writing that "The girl in this photo has not been retouched", which is found on almost every ad, is seen as a sign that this is just a marketing ploy. It will be interesting to see whether this is part of a long-term strategic positioning of aeri, which would certainly make sense.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

Hipsters Ruin Everything: This Denim Ad Parodies The Best Scene From 'American Psycho' (Video) | Elite Daily

Hipsters Ruin Everything: This Denim Ad Parodies The Best Scene From 'American Psycho' (Video) | Elite Daily | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Only an ad agency based in Amsterdam could come up with a commercial this amazing because whoever came up with the idea to make a jeans commercial based on the infamous business card scene in "American Pyscho" had to be f*cking stoned.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

If you like American Psycho, this one is for you. And if you are interested in how brands become producers of cultural content, this is especially for you.

 

I am not sure how to call this 6 minute parody of American Psycho / hipster culture yet. Maybe "cinematographic content marketing"? It surely is content marketing, one of the finest and most entertaining examples, as it provides some valuable entertainment instead of pure information and the deepening of mindshare through repition. You could also call it branded entertainment, as this 6 minute video almost reaches short movie format. 

 

However you call it, from a creative perspective this video just strikes the totally right balance in borrowing from an iconic movie and updating it into a new era. What was the Yuppie in the 80s are the Hipsters in the 10s: Both privileged in their lifestyles and obsessed with status consumption. At first, I was irritated that Bateman's famous Phil Collins monologue was replaced by a lecture about the merits of animal-digested coffee beans, but it totally makes sense from two perspectives: First, the furthering of niche interests and cultural consumption / habitus in the hipster culture, and second as a wonderful tie in to the marketing strategy of this jeans outlet to provide a refreshing atmosphere in their stores. You will have to watch the video in order to figure out what I mean by this, because I don't want to take this away from you.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Steve Neta
Scoop.it!

Latest Horror-Movie Ad Prank, With a Screaming Devil Baby, Is Completely Messed Up

Latest Horror-Movie Ad Prank, With a Screaming Devil Baby, Is Completely Messed Up | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Here's one baby that no one's expecting.

 

Steve Neta's insight:

This video caught my attention as it made national news headlines across North America today. Call it marketing, a publicity stunt, a bad prank – or as some in the marketing world call it, “prankvertising”. It creates some good food for thought. The prank was staged in New York City and it tempted the good will of passers-by with what appeared to be an abandoned baby carriage. When a good Samaritan checks on the carriage, the “Devil Baby” sits up and screams at him or her – at times the remote-controlled carriage would chase them as well.

 

At face value, this prank achieved what was intended – it got people across the continent talking about the stunt and linked it to the movie, Devil’s Due. However, it raises an interesting question in these types of marketing “stunts”: How much is too much?

 

On one hand, video of this prank went viral and drew a ton of publicity. On the other hand, it took unsuspecting well-meaning people and gave them quite a scare – all while filming it to be later shown to the world. David Gianatsio of AdWeek notes that these efforts “can be invasive, sadistic and potentially risky.” The risks can be many because, as Gianatsio’s article points out, reactions from non-actors can be real. There are risks in people getting hurt, legal liabilities, and causing traumatic consequences.

 

There are friendlier versions of prankvertising, but what is the true value in stunts that trade on fear and verge on obscenity? One cannot deny that they attract attention – in just one day, “Devil Baby Attack” has garnered nearly 16.5 million views. What really needs to be considered is “how much is too much?” There can be a fine line to walk between getting attention and being offensive.

more...
Iunisi Vaiaku's curator insight, March 19, 2014 12:01 AM

A approach the horror film industry is trying to market out horror films. Good article about the ethical side to how much is too far for advertisers and especially for this case with devil baby! Being punished for being morally good??

Suggested by Paul Brown
Scoop.it!

Burberry’s Success Story with building relationships through social media integration via Salesforce.com

Burberry’s Success Story with building relationships through social media integration via Salesforce.com | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Luxury brand Burberry uses the salesforce.com platform to deliver rich and exciting retail and runway experiences that are social and mobile first.  They are providing quick chat responses around the clock and ‘Mobile First’ events to prove that their social and mobile customers are important to them; by doing so, they are increasing customer relationships and loyalty. 

 

“You have to create a Social Enterprise today,” says Burberry CEO, Angela Ahrendts, which is why Burberry was one of the first to create a social networking chat platform.  BurberryChat provides associate responses to customer queries in less than twenty seconds.  Also, high executives from the company take time each week to post videos for their mobile followers about new initiatives and products. 

 

The release of Burberry’s salesforce.com has taken their customer relations to the next level.  When a customer agrees to opt into the service, it tracks what is in their carts, what customizable items they have created, what they have purchased in the past, and what they have shared online with their friends.  In-store sales associates can then use that information to better assist customers in finding exactly what they are looking for. 

 

Burberry has also featured several innovative ‘Mobile First’ events, where followers can watch exclusive Burberry fashion shows on their mobile devices prior to its television release.  Ahrendts mentions that “this is how customers live, they wake up with their phone in their hand, and life begins.”

 

Burberry is creating a competitive advantage by leveraging social and mobile marketing techniques to strengthen their customer relationships and loyalty.  Beyond bolstering loyalty, it will be interesting to see if they use the information they gather to promulgate personalized advertisement in order to generate further income, or if they decide to hold themselves to a higher standard. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Paul Brown
Scoop.it!

Google developing Street View-like feature for hotel interiors | Marketing Magazine

Google developing Street View-like feature for hotel interiors | Marketing Magazine | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered what the inside of the hotel really looks like before you hit the ‘confirm booking’ button?  Well, Google is taking the lead with another innovative idea which will show you just that. 

 

Google is working with major hotel companies, like Best Western and Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group, to bring you high-resolution 360° virtual tours of thousands of hotels across North America.  These organizations are providing Google with footage of their lobbies, bars, restaurants, guestroom, and even their conference centers and pools where applicable. 

 

By providing this unique service, Google is solidifying that their brand is a step above the competition, which will entice potential consumers who are searching for accommodations to use Google.  This in turn will allow Google to increase their advertisement income with the added hits.  As a result, Google is increasing their number of users, improving customer satisfaction and customer relations, and increasing revenue for the organization.   

 

Carlson is also working on developing another feature which will allow guests to move through the floor plan of their hotels.  I would personally like to see this function extended to things such as sites to see, and attractions in the vicinity of the hotel.

 

Finally, a new online payment application called Google Wallet is being launched which has associations with Omni Hotels and Resorts, Marriott, Avis, Amtrak, Alaska Airlines, and Orbitz. It will track loyalty program information in order to provide additional benefits to the consumers who choose to use Google for their travel needs.

 

Google continues to use their massive empire to spark new trends and wade into unchartered waters, but what makes them so successful is that they do it by asking their users what they want, and by keeping customers at the center of their new initiatives. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Kathryn Moore
Scoop.it!

Will consumers accept in-store mobile communications?

Will consumers accept in-store mobile communications? | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

marketingmag.ca/news/marketer-news/infographic-canadians-want-in-store-mobile-offers-but-only-if-theyre-relevant-84006

 

“…don't let anybody kid you. It's all personal, every bit of business.” – Mario Puzo, The Godfather

 

Creating a highly personalized and compelling customer experience that serves to drive business results is the challenge for marketers.  When executed correctly in-store, real-time, mobile marketing provides yet another vehicle to optimize customer loyalty and satisfaction and capture value.   

 

Data suggests that mobile, tech-savy shoppers are more receptive to receiving personalized promotions on their smartphones as long as these promotions enhance the shopping experience.  The challenge is in correctly identifying and leveraging individual consumer insights through such hyper-targeted mobile marketing campaigns.  The days of ‘spray and pray’ are over. 

 

Heightening the customer experience includes promoting complementary product lines.  Retailers should take note that seventy-one percent of customers surveyed identified that they would make a purchase if presented with a promotion on their smartphone for a complementary product; perhaps a coordinating hat and scarf to accompany the new coat you are purchasing.  Delivering mobile notifications tailored to customer needs while clients are in-store will drive profitability as long as the customer feels that the business truly understands his or her requirements.

 

Marketing success and the ability to speak to clients on a one-on-one basis drives sales when executed correctly.  However, marketers need to be warned - get it right or risk damaging the customer experience, relationship and, ultimately, the ability to capture value – because, in business, its all personal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

Marketing moves the world

FEATURING Michael Lerner, Ivo Nandi, Mark Saul, Mark Kelley, Jennefer Lafleur, Juzo Yoshida, Joe Pistone, Jon Schmidt AGENCY Goodby, Silverstein & Partners CREATIVES…
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

A humorous take on how marketing moves the world. A great intro video for presentations on marketing, such as my first Introduction to Marketing lecture tomorrow morning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

WestJet Christmas Miracle: real-time giving

Thanks to a team of merry WestJetters and the power of technology, we've learned that miracles really do happen. See how we did it, and learn how you could w...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

A wonderful example of how event marketing spins into a viral social media campaign, thereby multiplying the effect and reach of the campaign.

 

WestJet passenger spoke with a WestJet Santa (in blue, of course) before boarding, telling them all their wishes for christmas. Thanks to the WestJet elves who ran into the stores, passengers received their presents upon arrival while waiting for their luggage.

 

This is the right time to launch such a campaign, and even though it seems expensive to buy TVs and Andriod tablets for your passengers, the reach that is generated by this campaign for free will easily make up for it. It is another good example how you can plan to become viral, similar to Volvo's stunt with Jean Claude van Damme. In the current WestJet case, the timing is excellent and the campaign plays high on real emotions that are captured on the faces of the everyday people in the video.

 

But really, I think it is mainly a timing issue and a desire for miracles. We all long for a miracle for christmas, and having an airline that reinforces kids beliefs into the magical figure of Santa is a good trigger to share this video.

more...
Axelle Breton's curator insight, December 12, 2013 5:53 AM

Un beau cadeau pour les clients Westjet!

Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

Red Bull's Content / Social Media Strategy · joachimscholz · Storify

A short collection of links and thoughts about Red Bull's marketing strategy for future analysis.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

I pulled together some links for reading about Red Bull's success in their content / social media marketing strategy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

 Vine Creates Major Buzz asThe Next Thing in Social Media

 Vine Creates Major Buzz asThe Next Thing in Social Media | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Vine is a cutting edge new iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch application that will revolutionize marketing and communication for brands. Vine is a mobile service that lets you create and share short looping videos (Vine Lab, Inc.: 2013). Although there are a variety of other apps circulating with the same objectives, Vine has been able to attain a competitive advantage by being purchased by Twitter. Being owned by a major company in the social media industry will enhance Vine’s brand name. There has yet to be a definitive number of users to date; however, Vine is currently ranked number 13 on the iTunes App store. When asked why he purchased Vince, Twitter CEO answered “It’s the next big thing” (D’Orazio: 2013).

 

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

If you are interested in how to use Vine for your marketing strategy, most post online will just show you some eye-candy examples of what creative executions brands have come up with for using Vine. But how does Vine fit into your marketing strategy? My students Alexandra Marinelli and Jeremy Vincent spent some thoughts on this. Some really good ones, so I want to share them with you.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Ross Tansley
Scoop.it!

The 'Internet of Things' Heralds the Arrival of the Jetsons Age

The 'Internet of Things' Heralds the Arrival of the Jetsons Age | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

The article “Internet of things” depicts how the internet will connect and automate everyday items that until now have been standalone; fridge, stove and microwave.   Emerging technologies will allow devices to talk to one another and automatically perform a task or update without having to so much as push a button.  It is going beyond programmable thermostats; the thermostat will adjust the temperature because it knows when everyone has left the home. 

Tech companies are responding to changing consumer behaviour by catering to the need for a more efficient lifestyle.   As mentioned in the article, this is the very way that tech companies will attract consumers; their value proposition.

Although not mentioned throughout the article, pricing must be major component of the marketing strategy and therefore integrated into the value proposition.  Selling on the notion of automation alone will grab the attention of almost all consumers who own their home.  However, in order to ensure the widest market share is obtained the price must be affordable.   Automated systems in homes and cars are very expensive making this product only available to the wealthy. For example, lights in a room that become brighter or dimmer depending on the amount of sunlight available. Homes are already price inflated making it hard to justify adding additional costs for a want and not a need.  In order to mainstream these devices into the homes of the average consumer, the price must be affordable.

An additional way to attract the average customer would be to promote how automation can save on the cost of maintaining a home.  As mentioned in the example above, lights dimming when more natural light shines in will save money in the long run.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Push Up Muscle Shirt | The Flattering Man

The Push Up Muscle Shirt | The Flattering Man | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Just read about this. It looks kind of amazing. beats getting a gym pass am I right?
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Old Spice guy is back, this time with a version of "prankvertising" that enlists viewers to prank their own buddies. Old Spice has been successful in getting their commercials viral before, mainly due to its irony and invitations to engage with the makers of the commercials. This campaign starts a new page in Old Spice's playbook, as it takes the marketer out of the way and just lets consumers spread the message among each other without any company interaction. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by A. Savard
Scoop.it!

Cause Marketing | It's Good Business!

Cause Marketing | It's Good Business! | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Cause Marketing – an unconventional marketing tool!

 

Terry O’Reilly from CBC’s Under the Influence delivers an interesting view of how “cause marketing” is breaking new barriers by connecting for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in an atypical partnership of marketing and advertising aimed to generate profit while supporting important causes around the world.  


Cause marketing is a relatively new term aimed to make the world a better place through service of the public, whereas traditional brand marketing focuses on making a profit in the service of corporations.  O’Reilly explains that despite “many non-profits looking at corporations as money-hungry machines, and corporations viewing non-profits as an endless line of charities looking for handouts”, when the right partnerships align, remarkable results can be achieved.  The article presents a series of successful cause marketing partnerships, including Marriot & the March of Dimes, American Express & the Statue of Liberty Restoration Project, Home Depot & KaBOOM, and Bono’s “Product RED” campaign, all of which build upon the sustainable marketing platform of taking responsible social and environmental action to meet both the short and long-term needs of customers and their organization.

 

Further, the Cone Millennial Cause Study indicated that nearly 70% of respondents preferred brands they believe to be socially responsible, and almost 90% indicated they would switch brands if that corporation is associated with a good-cause. Cause marketing not only serves as a marketing tool to extend both brand and cause awareness, but it can also enhance consumer loyalty by building stronger connections, all of which create win-win solutions.  

  

O’Reilly concludes that successful cause marketing requires sustainability, a feat driven by profit over cause.  Corporations cannot afford to ignore core business first - marketing has to lead with the product, not the cause – yet, cause marketing should not be overlooked as a tool for one’s marketing platform! 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

How Stars Like Jay Z And Martha Stewart End Up With Samsung Devices

How Stars Like Jay Z And Martha Stewart End Up With Samsung Devices | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Meet the superconnector behind Samsung's mysterious and elite influencer recruitment program. And see what it feels like to be White Gloved.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

This is not your everyday Tupperware party: Samsung puts a great amount of effort into targeting influencers in business and showbizz to catch up on Apple's sucess with the iPhone. From the article:

 

"The White Glove program is a cross between the social marketing of Tupperware parties (minus the pressure to buy something), the house calls of Mormon missionaries (minus the pressure to give up smoking), and the persistence of Green Eggs and Ham--but for gadgets. A friendly, clean-cut rep shows up to dinner at your friend’s house one night, teaches you all about the “product,” and lets you take it home and decide for yourself. At no cost."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD from Integrated Brand Communications
Scoop.it!

Branding Strategy Insider | 7 Strategies To Create New Business Categories

Branding Strategy Insider | 7 Strategies To Create New Business Categories | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

I have written about creating “category-of-one” brands before. Most brands spend their time trying to increase their share of existing markets. They pursue many different tactics to do so, from innovating new product functions and features and offering price promotions (which erodes brand equity) to improving product quality and creating value-added services. Some even create highly entertaining ads hoping this will help them break through the category messaging clutter. The problem with these approaches is that they are incremental and most of them can be very easily matched by the competition.

 

Brand managers know how difficult it can be to create brand differentiation within an existing category. In mature markets, every market position has already been taken. True breakthroughs come only from creating entirely new categories, highly compelling new categories.

 

So, how does a brand manager achieve this?


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
more...
Intriguing Networks's curator insight, January 21, 2014 4:15 AM

#what a great simple headline and eye catchig graphic. Does what it says on the tin.

Intriguing Networks's curator insight, January 21, 2014 4:17 AM

neat graphic and the right ideas but will it turn your head?

Nick Jennings's curator insight, September 8, 2014 3:50 AM

This article provides insight as to how businesses can differentiate themselves from the competition. The use of breaking customer compromises can separate a company from its competition with a distinct and unique stand point. The article lists Amazon as an example which I feel is accurate as they were able to change the face of customer purchasing with just the click of a finger. By recreating a category it can develop customer retention and brand differentiation. Cirque Du Soleil is a fantastic example as they have positioned themselves as a circus unlike any other creating a new and exciting experience for the consumer. These are just some examples of how marketers can create differentiation from other brands and build both band recognition and recall.

Suggested by Kevin Hastey
Scoop.it!

Nvidia crop circle marketing stunt gets attention

Nvidia crop circle marketing stunt gets attention | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
A chip maker's plot to draw attention to a new product had people scratching their heads and looking for UFOs

 

Not sure if this is how I do this, I can get it to post with the insight tag on my own page, but I don't seem to get that option here.

 

This is a strong example of using mystery and the main stream media to do your marketing for you and at little cost. 

 

The level of detail in the crop circle plays on people who believe that “aliens” are out there to drive the story and because of the buzz create by those who are alien visitor believers, main stream media outlets like CNN which cater to people’s desire to believe in the weird and wonderful quickly hopped onboard with the story giving it international attention. http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/01/us/california-crop-circle-gone/

 

It is also an effective campaign due to the many meanings of the number 192 that is written in braille in the crop circle design.  These possible meanings created further interest in the story as many individuals taking a preference as to which of the various meanings of the number were trying to be represented caused further attention in the media.

 

Adding to the buzz was the release of a YouTube video reportedly showing “aliens” creating the crop circle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eoz0QUYU45o

 

When the company Nvidia announced at the Consumer Electronics show that the crop circle was their work and was designed to promote the company’s newest chip for smart phones and tablets, the company was able to use all the publicity that the crop circle speculation and associated You tube video had created to effectively create a buzz about their company and its newest product prior to one of the world’s biggest electronics shows.

 

 http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_24853325/monterey-county-crop-circle-publicity-stunt-nvidia

 

The overall result is that Nvidia was able to be the buzz company at the start of the show and it created the effect at little cost by pandering to those who believe in the improbable and the main stream media’s desire to get the next big scoop!

 

This is my submission for Marketing trend #2

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Paul Brown
Scoop.it!

Scotiabank targets young adults with NFC poster campaign - NFC World

Scotiabank targets young adults with NFC poster campaign - NFC World | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Scotiabank’s Scene summer campaign is using state-of-the-art marketing technology to target Toronto’s young adults and movie enthusiasts. 

Near-Field Communication, or NFC, is a relatively new technology, which you may be familiar with in the form of your Credit Card’s Tap technology.  In essence, NFC is the interaction between a chip implanted in things (credit card or a NFC smart poster/ad), and an electronic device (supermarket payment terminal or cell phone). 

The Summer Scene Campaign, which used NFC technology, provided Toronto’s young adults and movie enthusiasts the opportunity to win or earn movie tickets by Tapping or Scanning one of the 80 Scene Smart Posters around Toronto with their NFC enabled phones.  This is helping to create a stronger relationship with their tech-savvy young adult consumers.  The posters also provided directions to the nearest Scotiabank, where consumers could sign up for a Scene card, which in turn would capture more value for Scotiabank. 

Samsung has signed a deal with NFC to include a built-in NFC reader in their new line of phones; NFC is currently working a similar deal with Apple. 

In Japan they are using NFC to allow customers to ‘like’ things via an interactive bracelet, just by swiping it against a product.  They are also using NFC to personalize ads, as individuals walk past a NFC smart board, there is a quick exchange of data, and the board posts a customized ad for that individual. 

Here in North America, Wired Magazine featured an NFC Lexus ad, where you can place your NFC enabled phone onto the magazine, and then use it to navigate Lexus’ internal navigation/audio system.  There are countless ways that this technology can be used, but I’d like to see it used in malls, to quickly upload maps and discounts to my iPhone. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by K.P. Page
Scoop.it!

Excessive packaging dangerous, frustrating for consumers: Poll - Many consumers consumed with rage about product packaging, CBC Marketplace poll reveals

Excessive packaging dangerous, frustrating for consumers: Poll - Many consumers consumed with rage about product packaging, CBC Marketplace poll reveals | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the content

From: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/excessive-packaging-dangerous-frustrating-for-consumers-poll-1.2490047, By Megan Griffith-Greene, CBC News Posted: Jan 10, 2014 5:00 AM ET

 

This article defines ‘wrap-rage’ as “the frustration people feel when trying to pry open hard plastic packaging that seems all but impenetrable”.  A Canadian Marketplace poll indicated 90 percent of Canadians experienced “wrap-rage” with packaging designed to market, showcase and protect products, as well as prevent theft.  Consumers are also increasingly annoyed with the environmental impact of waste generated through excessive and unrecyclable packaging.  One proffered solution was a tax on corporations not using recyclable material for packaging.

 

Who hasn’t experienced ‘wrap-rage’?!?   A broader definition, however, is required. Think of excessive cardboard, twist ties, and plastic which must sometimes be navigated to finally get to our product.  The article mentions these items as a recycling challenge but they were not attributed to ‘wrap-rage’. Numerous twist and zip-ties certainly raise my ire!  Frustration and inconvenience, however, should be usurped by the environmental impact of excessive and unrecyclable packaging. 

 

A tax is proffered as a means to obligate corporations to use recyclable materials for packaging, but the efficacy of a tax is questionable.  After all, those costs would simply be passed on to the consumer. The indirect result may be that the consumer chooses the more environmentally conscious manufacturer because of lower costs, which could, in turn, force corporations to re-examine their packaging.

 

In an era where corporate social responsibility is increasingly important, it is in the best interest of corporations, the environment and consumers if corporations were more environmentally responsible in their packaging.  Using recyclable materials could be a strong marketing tool that does not have to compromise showcasing and protecting products.  Reducing ‘wrap-rage’ associated with accessing the manufacturer’s product and addressing concerns about the environmental impact of non-recyclable packaging would benefit all and, ultimately, be an excellent marketing tool.

more...
Jess Ojeanto's curator insight, September 22, 2014 11:20 PM

agregar su visión ...

Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

How WIRED Designed the Ultimate Smartwatch | Wired Design | Wired.com

How WIRED Designed the Ultimate Smartwatch | Wired Design | Wired.com | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
WIRED commissioned Branch to design a smartwatch and glasses that are far slicker—and smarter—than anything on the market today.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Wearable computers will be, without a doubt, one of the mega trends in the coming years. And with the boundaries between online and offline, between physical and virtual, and between privacy and connectedness blurring more and more, the world of mobile marketing will also be one of the most exciting areas to play in - as is social media today.

 

But first we have to think about the products that will connect consumers with augmented reality and their social network in a less intrusive way. What Samsung and Google are presenting with Galaxy Gear and Google Glass, respectively, is a sad reminder of how environmentally friendly cleaner were marketed in the 1980s and 1990s: Functional. For the evangelists, may they be called treehuggers or nerds.

 

New patterns really take off when they are combined with existing patterns and tastes, worbing and transforming them into something new. That is why Method is so successful with its eco-chique household cleaners. 

 

This article from Wired puts out some concepts and thoughts on how these new wearable computers will look like. Some really good points are raised from a design perspective - for example that the whole point of glasses is to not constantly touch them to avoid finger prints and imbalancing the frame. You want to forget about the fact that you are wearing glasses, and only reminded once so often when you can see something in the distance you knew you would not have been able to see without glasses. The concept for smart glasses takes this idea further, and basically tucks our social connections away into a comfort blanket that only alerts us when things get busy - to check the smart bracelet around your wrist.

 

So another idea is born, which you won't find in the article: I doubt that the future killer wearable tech will be a stand alone device. It will be not ONLY the glasses that revolutionize how we engage with the physical-virtual world, and it will not be ONLY our watches how we engage with the social world, but it will be a combination of devices that are aware of each other and talk to each other.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

Beyoncé's Surprise Album Was the Year's Most Brilliant Release | Underwire | Wired.com

Beyoncé's Surprise Album Was the Year's Most Brilliant Release | Underwire | Wired.com | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Late last night Beyoncé released a surprise album on iTunes. The internet went nuts and it was great.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Beyoncé's aurprise album that dropped a few days ago is a wonderful example of how event marketing is being merged with social media marketing. You can consider this the wholy grail of interactive marketing - there, I said it. What do we look for in events? Excitement, memories, experiencing something that we will remember for a long time to come. And what do we look for in social media marketing? Engaging fans and followers to share information, to generate word of mouth, to trigger large-scale cascading effects. 

 

Beyoncé created a moment on social media, a time in which much of the social media chatter focused in on something unexpected, both in terms of its existence and its marketing. A secret album?! OMG! It is like an event that transcended its real world boundaries and became an online event, creating an incredible amount of buzz.

 

"This isn’t necessarily the future of album releases for major artists, but for someone like Beyoncé it might be the smartest way to do an album release. Whereas most artists constantly self-promote on social media, Beyoncé is using fever-pitch level of interest in Beyoncé to do the promoting for her. She didn’t put piles of pre-release teasers on YouTube; she released the album and let everyone else tease it for her." 

 

Will it work for everyone? Well, Beyonceé can pull it off on her own, but even lesser-known people could strive to find ways in which something unexpected, something unbelievably interesting happens all of the sudden. 

more...
Cody Nold's curator insight, March 15, 2014 6:09 PM

No Promoting need with this girl.

Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

American Apparel: How To Create Successful Social Media Campaigns | InsideFMM

American Apparel: How To Create Successful Social Media Campaigns | InsideFMM | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Fashion brand American Apparel discuss online marketing, fashion advertising and creating successful social media campaigns with fashion bloggers and websites.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

American Apparel is often mentioned as a social media fail in connection with their Hurricane Sandy promotion stunt (http://www.sugarspunmarketing.com/blog/social-media-marketing-goes-wrong/#.UqRpsGRDuwH). But this is unfair, as this stunt reflected the brand's voice. Yes, it offended a lot of people, but others found it hillarious. 

AA's social media story is a complex one: At one point in time (2008) they heavily invested in social advertising - with little success. Learning from that experience, AA has become more savvy in their social media strategy and found some interesting ways to engage their customers.

 

The article here is one example, showing how AA used Lookbook.nu to highlight the fashion statements of their consumers. Another great example is presented in a comparison of AA with Abercrombie & Fitch: http://socialmediainfluence.com/2010/08/18/american-apparel-and-abercrombie-fitch-different-social-media-strategies-in-hard-financial-times/ , and this article on being relatable to your audience (http://monabuzz.com/learning-brands-social-media-american-apparel/). All three articles are great reads.

more...
Axelle Breton's curator insight, December 10, 2013 5:31 AM

American apparel revoit sa stratégie digitale

Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
Scoop.it!

7 Brands David Aaker Admired in 2013

7 Brands David Aaker Admired in 2013 | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Tesla, Patagonia, Red Bull, Gillette are brands that Marketing Giant David Aaker admired in 2013. No big surprises here, as those brands are on the top of most people's tongues you can quiz about strong brands in 2013. I haven't heart of Tanita before who are a healthy living giant in Japan, and I was unaware of Kmart's viral video campaigns. So I learnt something, that's why this is post is up here. (But seriously: Calling your company "Prophet", that's a little bit over the top, Dr. Aaker :)

more...
malek's comment, January 18, 2014 4:47 PM
Dove “Campaign for Real Beauty” can change the CPG advertising industry