Marketing in Motion
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Marketing in Motion
Marketing practice is rapidly changing. This topic explores the latest trends in marketing communications, digital and mobile marketing, social media, community / tribal marketing and value co-creation.
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Understanding youth attitudes to social media | Marketing Magazine

Understanding youth attitudes to social media | Marketing Magazine | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Understanding youth attitudes to social media, Young people now have mixed feelings about social media, so brands must proceed with caution, advises Sophie Maunder-Allan, group strategy officer at VCCP. | Marketing Magazine
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

 

Insight by Kathryn Moore:

 

This is a cautionary tale for all marketers.  

 

Brands are successful insofar as they create a positive brand experience for their customers.  The brand experience, either positive or negative, is the result of the cumulative customer experience over multiple points of contact with the brand.  Communicating brand messages via social media is common practice for marketers wishing to engage with this youthful demographic.  However, current research suggests that we may not truly understand how our digital natives really feel about social media; and, it is time to debunk the myth.  

 

It is a commonly held belief that our adolescents are,“…antisocial cyberbullies who lock themselves in their bedrooms, becoming pale, spotty and incompetent in rare face-to-face social situations”.  The current research suggests that this assessment couldn’t be further from the truth.  Rather, it appears that our youth feel anxious, stressed and trapped by social media.   As our digital natives, they are at the leading edge of technology adoption and receive little guidance about how and when to use these technologies, or, as the author asserts, “They are being left, literally, to their own devices – often a multitude of them.”   The message for marketers is that continued bombardment of brand messages on social media may make this demographic react negatively to the brand.  Our youth, it appears, actually value real brand connections and experiences.  

 

The more things change, the more they stay the same; it would appear that our young people are as misunderstood as previous generations.  For marketers, this message serves as a cautionary tale - communicating brand messages through social media to our digital natives could end up doing more harm than good. 

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Quick-Service Restaurant Chains ~ Mobile Marketing Draws Customers

Quick-Service Restaurant Chains ~           Mobile Marketing Draws Customers | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Quick-service operators increasingly have the ability to target their customers right where they are. The industry’s use of mobile marketing has grown exponentially over the last two years, and marketers are projected to spend $1.2 billion on mobile display advertising (not including smartphone apps, mobile coupons, and other mobile ads) by 2014, according to eMarketer.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by Andre Savard:

 

In an era dominated by digital consumerism and heightened demand for convenience-based goods and services, many quick-service restaurant chains, such as Subway, Domino’s Pizza, and Burger King, are ramping up their mobile marketing campaigns to leverage digital technologies in effort to better connect and interact with the right consumers, at the right time, and in the right place.

 

Reliant on speedy delivery, quick-service restaurants have launched a series of new mobile marketing tools to enhance the consumer experience and streamline the conventional restaurant-consumer transaction by allowing consumers to create, pay, and submit their orders virtually using their mobile devices.  Subway has developed an interactive mobile marketing tool that allows consumers to create and order their own sandwich via a virtual production line, and in turn designate a pick-up location and time to avoid in-store lines.  Similarly, Domino’s Pizza connects with consumers through a new mobile tool that provides direct user updates throughout the entire pizza preparation process, including who is making the pizza.   Further, geo-location technology is being incorporated into many mobile marketing campaigns as a means to improve the delivery of advertisements toward targeted consumers who are within a store’s vicinity.  For instance, Burger King’s “geo-aware” mobile marketing campaign, “Free Fries Friday”, successfully leveraged user location data to tweak advertising through targeted banner ads; results revealed a 3.21% click-through user rate, as opposed to an average 0.33% by other direct marketing mobile campaigns.  

 

Although mobile marketing tools and advertisements are gaining traction among quick-service restaurant chains, marketers must remain cognizant that consumers continue to be bombarded by countless marketing ploys each day, hence the delivery and appeal of such mobile marketing is critical to success.  Thus, marketers must develop mobile marketing campaigns that seek to generate customer value; otherwise, efforts will be construed by consumers as merely mobile spam.

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Adobe Systems - "the Cloud's" digital and mobile marketing

Adobe Systems - "the Cloud's" digital and mobile marketing | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Adobe Systems announced “the next generation” of Adobe Marketing Cloudofferings at the 2014 Adobe Summit: The Digital Marketing Conference. Here's a breakdown of how the company is expanding its personalization, mobile, and core services within the Marketing Cloud.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by K.P. Page

 

In this article, Ms Dupre discusses Adobe Systems’ upgraded Adobe Marketing Cloud, which expands Adobe’s focus on personalization, mobile and, breaking with the article’s title, core services. 

 

“Personalization” is targeted towards two categories – consumers and clients.  Adobe Target Premium is a self-learning algorithm that collects and analyses consumer behaviour across digital and mobile channels.  Adobe Experience Manager is focused on integrating sites, assets, communities, adaptable forms and mobile apps to provide clients with an integrated repository to develop future marketing strategies.

 

“Mobile” recognizes that consumers are spending up to three times more on mobile devices than on websites and that app users tend to have stronger brand loyalty and recognition.  To leverage this, Adobe Systems expanded mobile targeting through tracking user behaviour data, measuring returns on investment, sending push notifications based on consumer locations and re-engaging clients who stop using a particular app.

 

“Core Services” describes maximizing the Cloud experience through what is referred to as multichannel optimization by building profiles, sharing assets and providing a mixed marketing platform across the digital and mobile platforms.  For the consumer, the focus is tailored marketing. For Adobe’s marketing clients, the focus is accessible and integrated information.

 

The article provides insight into the level of sophistication and commitment Adobe Systems has dedicated to CRM.  The data-mining and analysis serve both the consumers through customized profiles and Adobe’s clients through access to a single repository to streamline processes and better inform marketing strategies.  The “relationship” in CRM is evident in the focus on re-engagement if the consumer stops using an app – there does, however, need to be a balance to avoid annoying the consumer. 

 

Linking back to the article’s title, the only marketing threat is to companies which don’t keep pace with Adobe Systems’ focus on the consumer, the client, and media trends. 

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Wayne Brady Acts Out Frito Lay Flavor Suggestions on Twitter | News - Advertising Age

Wayne Brady Acts Out Frito Lay Flavor Suggestions on Twitter | News - Advertising Age | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Try acting out potato chip flavors, improvisational style, in front of thousands of social media followers. On Tuesday this will become the next career highlight -- or lowlight -- for Wayne Brady.

 

The celebrity entertainer known for his work on "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" is lending his acting talents to Lay's "Do Us a Flavor" contest in a real-time, social media video campaign.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Ronald Balkaran:

 

Social media users continue to grow at a rapid rate and marketers are scrambling to jump on the social media train.  After a successful debut in Canada in 2013, Lays recently announced the return of its “Do Us a Flavour” contest which invites fans across the country to submit their ideas for the next great potato chip flavour.  In addition to website submissions, participants can send ideas through text messaging and via mail.  But that’s not all.  Lays has opened up the flood gates through social media interaction by also accepting ideas through Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr and Instagram. 

 

New for this year’s contest is the new Twitter destination at www.twitter.com/LaysCanada where Canadians can also join the “flavour” conversation.  In addition, to kick off its latest promotion through a social media video campaign, improv comedian Wayne Brady produced several real-time impromptu songs for flavours suggested by social media fans.  Lays covered all social media networks and maintained an integrated marketing communication strategy which also included television and print advertising.

 

Lays’ use of social media maintains interaction with consumers whether submitting a flavour, voting for a flavour or simply joining the “flavour” conversation.  In addition, social media will be central to the final chosen contestants as they spread the word of their progress and increase their voting chance to win.  Lastly, the variety of flavour ideas will no doubt generate talk and word of mouth marketing.  Lays has penetrated the social media networks for this contest and can build free and authentic endorsements.  This should not come as a surprise as potato chips are normally at the centre of all social events!

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On it: How marketers are promoting brands in real time with social media.

On it: How marketers are promoting brands in real time with social media. | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Advertisers watch what's trending and craft content to match.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by Cynthia MacEachern:

 

This Wall Street Journal article discusses how advertisers are beginning to use social media for real time brand promotion and it focuses on the new tools that allow it.  Marketers are interacting on social media and joining conversations in real time.  The idea is active brand promotion to a highly targeted population. With video feed now possible through Twitter’s Vine services and Instagram, the tool set for brand management has just become more robust, and it has changed the nature of the marketing playing field again.  The article offers useful advice about how to promote brands in real time.  Among other things it suggests experimenting with new media, following but not joining conversations, and watching social media for flurries of activity.


More important than how to do it are the strategic implications of real time promotion.  Real time communication is the important game-changer here-not the tools and methods.  It follows social media activity and trends as they occur and contributes to these conversations at the right time with the right message.  This activity is a powerful tool for executing branding strategies and campaigns.  There are competitive advantages for the most nimble organizations-those who can react instantly using a solid marketing playbook as a reference.  To enable it, firms must decentralize authority within their marketing organizations.  They must move from a contemplative, deliberate campaign planning orientation to a different dynamic.  Now, marketing and promotion will be tactical activities that can have an immediate effect on the organizations success and will be even more empowered to conduct brand management and CRM activities.


The advantages are significant.  Real time marketing enables a firm to establish tone and presence, leverage news as it happens, and to engage social media influencers immediately.  This bears considerable attention past simply the tools that enable it.

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In The Last Week I've Spent $127 Playing Candy Crush Saga

In The Last Week I've Spent $127 Playing Candy Crush Saga | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Candy Crush Saga is the top grossing app in the Apple iTunes store and it's because of people like me.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by Ishaan Srivastava

 

Free to play? Really?

 

That is the question that comes to mind when one looks at the dynamics of mobile game sales and consumption. When people funnel their entire paycheques into paying for what is a "Free to play" game, one is compelled to examine the psychological stimuli that leads to this behaviour, and to the shift in the revenue generation paradigm from advertising to in-app purchases.

 

"King, the company behind hit mobile game ‘Candy Crush Saga’ stopped using advertising as a source of revenue, instead relying on virtual currency." - Mobile World Live

 

There has been an undeniable shift in in the revenue generation paradigms of mobile games. Where once in game advertising was the primary revenue generator, and users had to purchase the app to get rid of the ads, today, an increasing number of mobile app developers focus on revenue generation through in-app purchases. The idea is to sell add ons and services within the game environment.

 

This paradigm, where users make these in-app purchases instead of paying an upfront fee, has been dubbed the "Freemium" model. Since most casual gamers are unwilling to spend any measurable amount upfront for a game, this model very cheekily entices them into first downloading the free game, and then upgrading their character/abilities with "Boosts" that cost next to nothing, often no more that 99¢. With such a negligible amount, most users have no problem spending on upgrades. And they do so over and over again, never realizing how much they have spent cumulatively on the game. 

 

A number of factors aid in making these games so addictive that people spend hours at an end doing nothing but slumping over their phones, crushing candies, running from haunted temples or solving word puzzles. One is the fact that these are easy to play games. No special gaming skills are required. They are pick-up-and-play games. Another is their cross platform compatibility. Users can play these games on multiple devices, on both mobile and non-mobile platforms. The most potent, however, is what upgrades these games offer, and how these upgrades are offered.

 

Usually, users are given three options to unlock upgrades. First is through using up points earned in game. Although the simplest, users are usually reluctant to use up these points that form a pseudocurrency within the gaming environment. Second is by inviting other people through social media, a classic referral technique. Users often exhaust both themselves and those connected to them through incessant such requests. The final option, is to pay a nominal amount, usually less than a dollar, to unlock these upgrades. Payment is done through either PayPal or credit card accounts that were setup at the start of the game. After the first time, users often forget that they are spending actual money on these games, because the transaction happens in the background. Though some critics have labeled this a manipulative move, Freemium games continue to thrive.

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Superman With a GoPro - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

GoPro has found social media marketing gold: Consumers love their GoPro, and they go long ways to show them off. Luckily, the GoPro is a camera that can make videos, and the internetz loves videos. 

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Viral Marketing: The Carrie Telekinetic Coffee Shop Surprise Prank

Viral Marketing: The Carrie Telekinetic Coffee Shop Surprise Prank | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
How ThinkModo did viral marketing for the movie Carrie this 2013. Learn from them on how you can apply on the principles they use on making your brand viral.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

 

By James Donnelly:

 

The Marketing Trend considered for the 2nd review was the viral marketing campaign promoting the Carrie movie. A shop was altered for a telekinetic prank, with intent for video to ‘go viral’ to promote the weekend movie release.  Viral marketing uses a preexisting distribution network (such as a social network) to achieve marketing goals through a self-replicating process that is akin to a physical virus (flu or IT).  The intent of a viral campaign is to acquire disproportionate publicity far in excess of traditional marketing.


The primary intent of any campaign is to support the success of the product it is promoting.  In order to be successful, the viral campaign should:


1) Be like an actual virus, in that it can be easily replicated and spread.


a) The idea needs to be new, engaging and easy to search for or pass along.

b) The idea should be newsworthy to get supporting distribution from traditional media, often free.

c) Exceptional content to attract and retain the initial audience.

d) Appeal to influencers - those individuals that promote and sustain the product.

e) Make the virus contagious and easy to spread.  In this case, a link to the video is easily disseminated by the influencers.


2) Make it trigger strong emotions:  Tie-ins to emotion increase the likelihood of individuals spreading it.


3) Make it interesting and drive engagement.


Measured virally, this video was successful with 37M Youtube views in the 1st week, currently 54M views and 12,000 search results.  From a movie success view, the movie only grossed $35M domestically and an opening weekend of just $16M.  The extraordinary success of the viral campaign does not necessarily turn into a commercial success – conversely, this illustrates that a successful viral campaign can lack the tie-in to a product.

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Nicholas Wallace's curator insight, May 7, 2014 4:51 AM

A shop was altered for a telekinetic prank, with intent for video to ‘go viral’ to promote the weekend movie release.  Viral marketing uses a preexisting distribution network (such as a social network) to achieve marketing goals through a self-replicating process that is akin to a physical virus (flu or IT).  The intent of a viral campaign is to acquire disproportionate publicity far in excess of traditional marketing.

 

The primary intent of any campaign is to support the success of the product it is promoting.  In order to be successful, the viral campaign should:

 

1) Be like an actual virus, in that it can be easily replicated and spread.

 

a) The idea needs to be new, engaging and easy to search for or pass along.

b) The idea should be newsworthy to get supporting distribution from traditional media, often free.

c) Exceptional content to attract and retain the initial audience.

d) Appeal to influencers - those individuals that promote and sustain the product.

e) Make the virus contagious and easy to spread.  In this case, a link to the video is easily disseminated by the influencers.

 

2) Make it trigger strong emotions:  Tie-ins to emotion increase the likelihood of individuals spreading it.

 

3) Make it interesting and drive engagement.

 

Measured virally, this video was successful with 37M Youtube views in the 1st week, currently 54M views and 12,000 search results.  From a movie success view, the movie only grossed $35M domestically and an opening weekend of just $16M.  The extraordinary success of the viral campaign does not necessarily turn into a commercial success – conversely, this illustrates that a successful viral campaign can lack the tie-in to a product.

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Snack company partners with Canadian Olympic Committee - Food In Canada

Snack company partners with Canadian Olympic Committee - Food In Canada | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Mondeléz Canada and the Canadian Olympic Committee have announced a four-year partnership, which will launch in time for the Winter Games in Sochi

 

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Karen P. Page:

 

Mondeléz Canada, which brands include Cadbury, Dentyne, and Christie, became an official sponsor of the Canadian Olympic Committee in November 2013.  Using Canada’s Olympic Team as the tool, Mondeléz Canada launched a public relations (PR) campaign, utilizing several strategies to obtain favorable publicity, promote select products and appeal to the Canadian market. 

 

Distinctive packaging for Mini-Chips Ahoy, Oreo cookies, Maple Leaf cookies and Ritz crackers were linked to the Olympics.  The packaging included: the official COC symbol; treats strategically placed upon ribbons to represent medals; and a maple leaf imprinted on Oreo and Ritz.

 

The campaign also made effective use of social media. Television integration with Canada Broadcasting Corporation prominently featured two animated mascots, Pride & Joy. There were live communications via Twitter and Facebook.  An interactive app was available for download on iTunes, Google Play or www.prideandjoy2014.ca.  The app provided users with updates and chances to win a variety of prizes, including a trip for two to Russia to watch the Men’s Gold Medal hockey match.  Mondeléz Canada also committed to donating $1, with a maximum of $50,000, to the COC for every download, thereby inviting Canadians to feel as though they were supporting the Canadian Olympic team.

 

The campaign was a PR success.  It appealed to the Canadian market’s “pride & joy” and afforded the opportunity for the public to support Canada’s athletes.  It provided excellent packaging and, through social media and traditional advertising, effectively linked the brand with the Olympics. To have improved upon the campaign, Mondeléz Canada should have further promoting the donation to the COC and announcing the grand prize winners. Publicity surrounding both events would have confirmed Mondeléz Canada’s commitments and served as a capstone opportunity to further promote their brand and Olympic sponsorship.

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Play a Giant Game of Pong on This McDonald's Billboard

Play a Giant Game of Pong on This McDonald's Billboard | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

DDB Stockholm came up with a cool interactive billboard for McDonald's that allows people with smartphones to play McPong, for lack of a better name, using app-free geolocation technology.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Ronald Balkaran:

 

With technology advancements and emerging trends in digital media, traditional billboard advertising has been viewed as dull and boring with little effect on lasting impression.  McDonalds launched its pick n’ play advertising in Stockholm with a game of pong on the “big screen” and put life back into outdoor billboard advertising.  The advertisement uses an interactive billboard which allows people to play a game of pong using their smartphones without the requirement for downloading an app.  Players who survive more than 30 seconds in the game are rewarded with digital coupons which can be used at the nearby McDonalds restaurant.

McDonalds capitalized on the growing digital media meets outdoor advertising trend to interact with consumers.  Games appeal to our sense of fun and competition and McDonalds not only took advantage of this behavioural trait but did so in an open arena.  The advertisement appealed to the excitement of being part of a game with an audience cheering on and the ability to share the experience which I think made it a huge success in engaging with consumers.  The reward of a coupon for a free meal beats any other offers of free meals on sites such as Groupon and Living social as this represents a true reward.  Participants are recognized for their achievement but, more importantly, feel a sense of accomplishment after the game.  This competition, accomplishment and reward system enhances consumers’ motivation while keeping it fun and exciting.  Perhaps McDonalds will now be associated with the good attributes of “fun and exciting” as opposed to “super size me.”  

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The Van Damme Dividend? Volvo Truck Sales Rise 31% - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ

The Van Damme Dividend? Volvo Truck Sales Rise 31% - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Volvo Truck sales continued to rise in November, although it's too early to tell how well its recent round of attention-grabbing YouTube ads will convert into new customers.

 

In December 2013, the Wall Street journal published an article on a sudden 31% rise in sales of Volvo Truck in November compared to the same period last year.   Considering the economic times that remain challenging in the EU, this increase is significant for Volvo truck.

The company is uncertain whether the increase in sales has been influenced by new stricter European emission taking effect in 2014 or if the sale is associated with a series of six viral videos launched on YouTube, one of which including Mr. Jean-Claude Van Damme featuring an “Epic split” between two trucks to demonstrate Volvo new Dynamic Steering viewed by more than 60 million in less than three months.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7FIvfx5J10

 

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Jean-Luc Rioux:

 

Web only commercials are becoming a growing trend as it is more economical compared to TV advertisement and possibly more impactful.  For example, a Sunday night football add costs $600,000 and will reach about 15 million people.  The Van Damme ad has already reached four times this exposure for a total conception cost of less than a million dollars. Not only did the video go viral, it created a series of parodies, each of them exposing even more the Volvo brand in the process.

 

Using spectacular combination of music, scenery and a well-chosen actor, Volvo truck was able to go beyond the expected brand positioning of attributes and benefits associated with the technology of Volvo truck.  Instead, the on-line video generated a clear mental image of Volvo Truck beliefs and values which triggered strong emotions in a much larger audience than originally intended. 

 

Although Volvo truck hasn’t pinpointed the exact cause of the spike in sales, in my mind, anything that generates such a viral response on YouTube has to improve exposure of the brand and lead to sales. 

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What we’re trying to say is, if you don’t buy our stuff, you might be a wuss.

What we’re trying to say is, if you don’t buy our stuff, you might be a wuss. | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Jim Bean advertising

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Ishaan Srivastava:

 

Usually, marketing is perceived as no more than an attempt to appease consumer preferences. Companies allocate significant resources to researching consumer preferences, developing new products that meet these predilections and promoting them on an international level. Every now and then, however, companies attempt instead to mould consumer preferences. This series of advertisements by the bourbon giant, Jim Bean, prove a perfect case in hand.

 

Through the interwoven use of virile fetishization, shame based masculinity,  old west nostalgia and the “American Spirit”, the bourbon giant attempts to coerce their male customers into relinquishing other forms of alcohol in favour of the brand’s product, endeavouring to create loyal following of devout fans who would order the stuff reflexively and would rarely consider anything else. This goes in sync with other brands of whisky that ride the same bandwagon. 

 

The concept of selling masculinity is surprisingly a new one, taking its origins in the feminist movement and being further provoked by the increase of a metrosexual culture that is perceived as making sissies out of innocent boys, who care more about pocket squares and selfies they do about muscle cars or cast iron. An entire industry of media and marketing devoted to being the proverbial manly man has formed, incessantly asking one question: “Where have all the real men gone?”.

 

But where in the olden days masculinity had to be earned, now it can simply be purchased. By hitting that deep-seated desire to attain some bygone image of masculinity, companies can get consumers to purchase their goods on instinct, in an attempt to become a bacon-chomping, wood-chopping caricature of what being man used to mean.

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SnapSaves - shop.snap.save

SnapSaves - shop.snap.save | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
SnapSaves gives you instant cash back on your daily grocery and personal care purchases at ANY retailer in Canada such as Walmart, Target, Loblaws, Costco, Whole Foods, Sobeys, No Frills, Superstore, Safeway, IGA, Shoppers Drug Mart and more!
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

This is a nice update on the coupons we all know, and also an example of how mobile marketing is not always all new, but can decidedly follow the established marketing mix. SnapSaves basically seems to be a digital or mobile coupon book. 

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Trulia's First National Campaign Focuses on Mobile-Minded Women

Trulia's First National Campaign Focuses on Mobile-Minded Women | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Home buying brand Trulia is launching its first national ad campaign this week, aiming to drive viewers—particularly women—to download the digital real estate brand's mobile app. 


"Women have 96 percent of the influence on purchase decisions," Kira Wampler, Trulia's recently named CMO, its first, told Adweek. "More mobile is also super important for us, as we see where the category is going."

 

Worth $45 million overall, the "Moment of Trulia" effort includes TV spots that will go live Monday on cable channels such as Scripps-owned HGTV, as well as digital radio (Pandora and iHeartRadio), online video (Hulu and HGTV.com), display, mobile and out-of-home advertising. Facebook and Twitter marketing will lean on earned-media plays, whilemommy bloggers are also in the mix. 

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Have you ever passed by a house that looks exactly like your dream house? but didn’t have enough time to write down the phone number of the real estate agent? or you wanted to go to the open house, but didn’t have time? Trulia is an online residential real estate company for home buyers, sellers, renters and real estate professionals. Trulia recently launched its first national ad campaign aimed for college-educated married women aged 25-44 to download their free mobile app,which provides free information regarding the house and connects potential home buyers with real estate agents. Trulia spent $45 million overall focusing on mobile and out-of home advertising for hand-held device female users. Trulia recognized that women have significant influence on purchase decisions when it comes to buying a house and it seems like Trulia’s mobile marketing is working quite well; Trulia’s digital efforts created twice as many leads as traditional marketing and mobile app install ads generally receives a 36 percent better return on investment compared to normal response in the home real estate category; moreover, Trulia agent stated that over half of the leads happen via mobile.

 

Trulia’s ad campaign (video:Moment of Trulia) will be successful as it contains sense of humor and it well highlights functional benefit of their service (viewing houses without any location or timing restriction, even in washroom or even when you are getting a pedicure!); Presently, real estate agents spend significant amount of money on traditional marketing; however, Trulia’s presented a possibility wherein mobile marketing can provide a solution to more affordable marketing strategy that can reach more people than traditional marketing tools such as display boards. Future? This type of mobile marketing providing mobile content will likely to gain more popularity as the number of mobile-device users continues to rise, so the future of mobile marketing is bright!

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How Pepsi's Grammatical Errors In Social Media Hurt Its Fight Against Coke

How Pepsi's Grammatical Errors In Social Media Hurt Its Fight Against Coke | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

According to a recent study, customers value proper grammar more than anything else in their social media interactions with brands.

 

That's bad news for Pepsi, which makes more grammar errors on LinkedIn than Coke, and for General Motors, which gets things wrong more than Ford.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by Ross Tansley:

 

Grammar has always been and will continue to be an important part in any type of communication. With social media growing in popularity as a channel for marketing, more ads are showing up as posts and messages to get the product’s message to the masses.  Using proper grammar can have a major impact on the effectiveness of getting the message out which goes tenfold for advertising.

The article “How Pepsi's Grammatical Errors In Social Media Hurt Its Fight Against Coke” discusses how grammatical errors can have an impact on how consumers perceive the brand.  The study conducted shows that “customers value proper grammar more than anything else in their social media interactions with brands”.  Moreover, it seems that big companies are not reviewing their social media content before it is released to the public which can have negative impacts.

 

There is an emphasis on grammar throughout our school age years and into our careers.  We are trained to pick up on grammatical errors and it is seen as something unfavorable; causing us to see a brand as unfavorable.   In addition, people will spend more time looking at the errors and completely overlook the meaning and intent of the advertisement.

 

Consumers will view the organization as unprofessional and sell a lower quality product, compared to the competition.  The article states that “the care that a company takes with its communications is often indicative of its overall attention to detail."  If they don’t put quality into their communications, how do we know they put quality into their products?

 

When comparing two companies occupying the same market and are competing for market share, promoting products through social media can be an effective way to capture the attention of consumers.  However, errors in the message will attract the wrong type of attention.

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Oreo plays off Olympic news with real-time strategy | Marketing Magazine

Oreo plays off Olympic news with real-time strategy | Marketing Magazine | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Oreo is leveraging its real-time marketing know-how, and a little good fortune, to show its support for Canada’s Olympic athletes during the Sochi Winter Olympics.

 

The snack brand started its Olympic campaign with a bit of raw luck: an animated ad that features a Canadian female skier winning gold debuted during the opening ceremonies. Less than a day later, Canada was abuzz with the gold medal win for skier Justine Dufour-Lapointe, as well as a silver for her sister Chloe. 

 

Oreo has been able to amplify that good luck with some real-time marketing that has actually been in the works for months. Oreo is often credited with one of the best examples of real-time marketing, at last year’s Super Bowl when it responded to half-hour-long power outage with its “You can still dunk in the dark” Tweet.

 

“We learned to be successful at unplanned, spontaneous moments by doing a lot of upfront planning and preparation,” says Mosakos. “We have been preparing for these Winter Games for months, and we have every scenario, every possible medal moment, and every possible Tweet/post ready, as well as the internal procedural prowess to be ready.”

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Social media has transformed the marketing environment allowing companies to react to events and communicate with their customers in a matter of milliseconds. This is the new speed of marketing, and many companies are beginning to capitalize on this new marketing environment through the use of real-time marketing.

 

Real-time marketing is marketing performed "on the fly" as a reaction to unplanned and spontaneous external events and moments.[1] Oreo was the brand that proved the power of real-time response during the 2012 Super Bowl, when it obtained a significant amount of attention by quickly responding to a half hour power outage in the stadium with its “You can still dunk in the dark” Tweet, which generated over 15,000 retweets.[2] Oreo has learned to be successful at unexpected, spontaneous moments by doing a lot of upfront planning and preparation and has recently leveraged its real-time marketing know-how to show its support for the Sochi Winter Olympics. In planning for the Olympics Oreo prepared for every possible scenario, and medal moment, which allowed the brand to take advantage of a number of events including the celebration of the three Dufort-Lapointe sisters competing in one event.

 

Successful social network marketing involves making relevant and genuine contributions to consumer conversations, without being to obtrusive.[3] Real-time marketing allows brands to join the conversation and act like a real human being online, as no one wants to be friends with a brand.[4] In addition, real- time communication allows brands to provide relevant content, which is more likely to catch people’s attention and encourage them to share. Oreos ability to join in on relevant conversations online is a perfect example of how social media can be used to market a brand.

 

(Marketing Trend 3 submission)


[1] Lieb, R. (2013). Real-Time Marketing: The Agility to Leverage 'Now'. Altimeter Group. Retrieved from: http://www.slideshare.net/lieblink/report-29336695

[2] Barakat, C. (2013). Real-Time Marketing Lessons from Audi and Oreo. Retrieved from: https://socialtimes.com/real-time-marketing-lessons-audi-oreo_b142681

[3]Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Trifts, V., Buchwitz, L. 2012. Marketing: An Introduction, Fourth Canadian Edition. Pearson Education Canada. 4th Canadian edition.

[4] Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Trifts, V., Buchwitz, L.(2012). Marketing: An Introduction, Fourth Canadian Edition. Pearson Education Canada. 4th Canadian edition.

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Fair Exchange? | Mobile Marketing Magazine

Fair Exchange? | Mobile Marketing Magazine | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Mobile advertising comes in for a lot of criticism in some quarters. Banner ads on mobile don’t work, so the argument goes; they are too intrusive and people don’t like them or click on them. There may be some truth in that, but it’s not doing much to stop mobile advertising’s seemingly unstoppable march towards dominance of the digital landscape.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by Karl Michaud:

 

The MobileMarketing article, Fair Exchange? - David Murphy - deflates the exuberance for mobile marketing, cautioning that to be successful the customer must buy into the value proposition. 

 

Murphy notes, “that global spending on mobile advertising had more than doubled in 2013, hitting $17.96bn . . . mobile will account for virtually all – 94 per cent – of that growth <UK 2014>.”  Despite significant growth in mobile marketing, unlike many authors’ articles that rave about it, Murphy cautions his readers by analyzing why three companies: Ovivo Mobile, Blyk, and Textmedia.biz failed miserably. These companies tried to reward customers with either free minutes or money for watching ads.  In all three cases many customers did not feel the value exchange was sufficient.  Murphy states if “. . .  the thing has a chance of going viral, and then you get the sort of numbers that start to attract the interest of brand advertisers.” 

 

Muphy writes about one example - Samba Mobile – which “claims to be enjoying success. . . . <but he> can’t help thinking, however, that anyone in the business of offering free airtime in return for looking at ads faces an uphill struggle to achieve critical mass.  . . . the amount of promotional material you have to consume to get a decent reward seems excessive.”

 

In Marketing: An Introduction, Gary Armstrong cautions that, “. . . companies must use mobile marketing responsibly or risk angering already ad-weary consumers.” (p. 541) While the growth in mobile marketing will likely continue to trend upwards, like all “new” methods, it will take time to figure out how best to use mobile marketing to be successful.  Clearly, it is not as simple as offering minutes or money for people’s time – legitimate value propositions, like in all other marketing plans are required for success.

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Red Bull triggers social engagement via mobile advertising - Advertising - Mobile Marketer

Red Bull triggers social engagement via mobile advertising - Advertising - Mobile Marketer | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Red Bull is enlisting mobile and social advertising to launch three new energy drink flavors.

 

 

In April 2013, Red Bull combined mobile and social advertising while launching three new energy drink flavors: cranberry, lime and blueberry flavors of the energy drink brand’s new Red Bull Editions products. Using applications such as Pandora, Red Bull specifically tailored its marketing to the taste preference of the application user.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by Jean-Luc Rioux:

 

Red Bull has mastered the art of content marketing. Based on many successes of the brand in the past, the company is developing ideas that simply attract readers, viewers and listeners to the brand.  By using mobile applications such as Pandora, Red Bull is communicating directly with its customer, tailoring publicity material to the desire of its client demographic. Given the active life-style associated with Red Bull users, maximizing a campaign effort on medium meant to be accessible while on the go is in perfect harmony with the company’s brand.

 

Red Bull Mocial’s (mobile and social) approach to marketing is optimizing the exposure of the brand by ensuring that each tool complements each other, maximizing communication and synergy about the brand’s latest products.  

 

Red Bull has enjoyed great success with sales promotion tools such as coupons which positively engaged the consumer to the brand. Although Red Bull had incredible success with its marketing, going forward the company may need to adjust its hype and sensationalism promotion campaign towards a more “Youtility” marketing concept.  The company should consider “giving” something useful for free as opposed to interrupting the customer in the way they communicate with their mobile. By competing for attention at the same level than the user’s family, Red Bull consumer may become increasingly annoyed by their marketing pollution approach.

 

However, for the time being, Red Bull brand's power exceeds its product which despite its association with extreme sport is nothing else then a drink!

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I see your secret rooms and give you a secret store hidden in Boston - Imgur

I see your secret rooms and give you a secret store hidden in Boston - Imgur | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Imgur is home to the web's most popular image content, curated in real time by a dedicated community through commenting, voting and sharing.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

The above is no extraordinary clothing store. It is a stealth clothing store, hidden inside a pretty sketchy looking groceries convenience store somewhere in Boston. 

 

Why would you hide your clothing store? Probably in order to increase your street cred and also to appeal through the mystery of having a secret store. You have to be initiated into the secret circle of store patrons by a friend (or in this case, by imgur), so basically this secret store takes the idea of a brand community to its fullest extent by making the entire store an exclusive place with members-only events (Fournier and Lee's 2009 Fort script).

 

Compared to the alternative (would you care about a non-secret store that is a good drive away from you, if you are surrounded by stores anyways?), keeping your store secret might be a good idea, but how do you get customers? You got to leak the information sometimes in order to get beyond the social circles of your current shoppers, and this is where imgur comes in. I would not be surprised if the store owner / his agency leaked that post on imgur himself.

 

For those of you in Boston: The address apparently is 6 Clearway St. in Boston, MA.

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Maple Leaf Foods CEO Michael McCain named Business Newsmaker of Year

Maple Leaf Foods CEO Michael McCain named Business Newsmaker of Year | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
TORONTO - Michael McCain's response to the listeriosis outbreak that killed 20 Canadians this summer showed both genuine compassion and cutthroat business sense, and helped Maple Leaf Foods Inc. (TSX:MFI) emerge relatively unscathed from one of the worst food-borne illness outbreaks in Canadian history.That public health disaster turned business success story has made the Maple Leaf CEO Canada's 2008 Business Newsmaker of the Year, as chosen in an annual survey of editors and broadcasters by The Canadian Press.McCain garnered 44 of 125 votes cast in the business newsmaker survey, followed by Conrad Black with 29 and Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, with 25.Shortly after dozens of cases of listeriosis were linked to cold cuts produced at Maple Leaf's Toronto plant on Aug. 23, McCain appeared in a television ad to issue a candid and abject apology for the outbreak.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

 

By David Warnke:

 

Managing a Public Health Disaster 

 

What do you do when a flaw with your product kills someone? In the summer of 2008, Maple Leaf Foods faced this public relations (PR) nightmare when a listeriosis outbreak associated with its Toronto meat plant resulted in the death of 20 Canadians. This deadly mistake immediately saw the public's confidence in the brand shaken as the company's stock immediately dropped from a high of $15 at the start of the year to below $7 per share when the story become public; it is estimated Maple Leaf lost at least $45 million. One would think this would spell the end of the Maple Leaf brand, but it did not. 

 

What makes this story truly intriguing is that it is not one of loss of the brand or the impact on those affected, but a rather a story of how leadership, values, and an effective PR campaign can go along way to maintaining the success and credibility of a brand. Certainly those affected by the tainted products deserve our condolences and this was the first thing that CEO Michael McCain did when he publically acknowledged the mistake in a Maple Leaf commercial. McCain's leadership showed throughout the PR campaign that saw him admit the company's responsibility and the "pinnacle of accountability" that he holds as CEO. 

 

Maple Leaf fought to maintain the integrity of the brand as they quickly conducted a mass recall of its products, closed production at the plant, settled its class action lawsuits, appointed a chief foods safety officer and continued to advocate their commitment to food safety, a core value to their business model. By December, the company's stock had rebounded to $10 per share and Michael McCain was chosen as Canada's 2008 Business Newsmaker of the year for his leadership of Maple Leaf through this tragedy.

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Toronto Raptors recruit Drake as Brand Ambassador ... Can the Franchise Rebound?

Toronto Raptors recruit Drake as Brand Ambassador ... Can the Franchise Rebound? | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Andre Savard:

 

Torontonian and hip hop star Drake, who once started from the bottom was recently announced by Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment as the new global brand ambassador to the struggling Toronto Raptors NBA franchise.  As the Raptors continue to be known for being stuck at the bottom, their new rebranding and PR campaign aims to use star power as part of a celebrity endorsement and franchise rebranding strategy.

 

Brand ambassadors have been well established in the world of marketing based on the concept that brand ambassadors symbolize cultural meanings in society, thus when a strong association exists between a product and an endorser, a median is created to connect the product with consumers, thus building and enhancing brand power.  How this marketing trend differs is that professional sports traditionally focus on actual player-hype and promotion in a branding campaign, rather than the injection of celebrity power.  This article illustrates how celebrity endorsement is becoming an integral part of marketing communications and branding for the Raptors, not to mention other NBA teams.  However, it can only work for the Raptors if consumers have a credible belief that Drake is genuinely committed and linked to the Raptors brand despite being paid to act so. Drake, who’s known for his strong musical tie to inner-cities, his courtside support to the Raptors, positive social-influence, and his chart-topping lyrics that praise “Toronto as a first-rate global city” evoke the marketing message sought by Raptors management.  The Raptors aim to boost franchise popularity and explore new branding opportunities with Drake as their brand ambassador.

 

Overall, the Raptors rebranding strategy shows promise for a franchise rebound; however, in an era dominated by social media and near instantaneous information exchange, there remains serious risk of marketing backfire if Drake’s public opinion shifts negative, thus creating unwanted brand associations!

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Tourism Queensland Seeks Applicants for "The Best Job in the World" - Island Caretaker - YouTube

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Cynthia MacEachern:

 

This 2009 “hiring” video by Tourism Queensland seeks applicants for “the best job in the world”.  The successful applicant would have responsibilities of living near on the Great Barrier Reef in a paid for beach house, “care take” the islands of the Great Barrier Reef, feed the island fish, blog and write about experiences, and receive a salary of 8800 dollars per month for six months. Recruitment ads were placed in print and on-line media and generated over 35,000 responses.   

 

Applicants were to apply by posting a video on-line explaining why they were the best one to be hired as a “caretaker of the islands”.  The PR activity, designed to promote tourism to the Great Barrier Reef succeeded beyond all imagination. For just one million dollars in costs, it was assessed to have generated seventy million dollars’ worth of value in global advertising.  It captured the attention of the global media, who fed reports of its progress over a period of months.  The applicant videos were available on-line for all to review and resulted in much high quality interaction between the public and Tourism Queensland. 

 

By all accounts it was a stunningly successful PR campaign that later won one of three grand prizes at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival-winning the digital category. Tourism Queensland leveraged several of today's trends in advertising and PR.  The marketing mix leans on promotion.  The recruiting ad focused on attracting attention with strong incentives, and it invited and rewarded customer responses-so was very interactive.  The message execution included elements of spice of life, lifestyle, and fantasy.  In broader terms this campaign takes advantage of the changes in technology to enable an interactive, digital experience.  This was an effective brand engagement.

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Charmin 'Rolls Out' Bold New Native Ad Campaign

Charmin 'Rolls Out' Bold New Native Ad Campaign | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Richelle Gaudet:

 

Confidence in traditional digital display advertising is quickly diminishing as consumers have become used to ignoring ads in almost a subconscious manner. Native advertising is a method of advertising that seeks to provide content in the context of a users experience, taking advantage of a media platform in the ways that consumers are actually using it. The goal is to make advertising less intrusive, increasing the likelihood that consumers pay attention or click on an ad.[1]  Recently, one of the most well known names in bathroom tissue, Charmin, has started using native advertising for the launch of their new promotional musical campaign based on the companies tagline “We all go, why not enjoy the go?”

 

The campaign features 30 second bathroom themed ballads, which Ripp identifies as “so well crafted, catchy, and authentically pop that many listeners are unaware that they’re enjoying an advertisement”, let alone a song about the ‘go’. The toilet tunes are taking advantage of available channels such as YouTube and iTunes radio, where a number of consumers listen to their favorite music hits.  The campaign acts to create interest around a highly commoditized product reaching audiences formerly oblivious to brand loyalty for bathroom tissue.

 

Good advertisements must be able to break through the clutter to gain and hold attention by providing content that is interesting, useful, or entertaining.[2] The merging of advertising and entertainment is one strategy, which can be used to create brand messages that are a part of entertainment rather then an interruption.[3] Charmin’s creative combination of informative marketing and musical entertainment is an interesting attempt at advertising which is sure to captivate consumers and convince them to choose Charmin as their “Number 1, when they go Number 2”.

 

[1] Ratcliff, C. 2013. What is Native Advertising and why do you need it? Retrieved from: https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-why-do-you-need-it.

[2] Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Trifts, V., Buchwitz, L. 2012. Marketing: An Introduction, Fourth Canadian Edition. Pearson Education Canada. 4th Canadian edition. PP. 464.

[3] Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Trifts, V., Buchwitz, L. 2012. Marketing: An Introduction, Fourth Canadian Edition. Pearson Education Canada. 4th Canadian edition. PP. 465.

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#GALAXY11: The Beginning - YouTube

Epic movie, I mean commercial, for Samsung. 

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Jaeik Bae:

 

Many companies make an investment to sponsor the big sport teams such as Manchester United, Real Madrid, and Chealsea FC, etc. It requires a significant amount of spending to become an official sponsor of these teams; nonetheless, sports team sponsorship is often proven effective as companies can connect their brands with the teams that are globally known and create many positive outcomes such as increased brand awareness and positive advertising effect. Moreover, there is no doubt that sporting events bring people together and create a sense of community for fans of all teams; however, only if they are cheering for the same team, right? Hence, companies must be careful in choosing which team to sponsor. Now, what if I tell you that Samsung is sponsoring “team Earth” to battle against aliens to defend the Earth? So we are all cheering for the same team. Interesting, right?

 

Samsung has recently launched its fantasy-inspired global marketing campaign-Galaxy 11. Samsung introduced a four-minute cinematic-style video, which contains famous soccer players from all around the globe such as Messi (Argentina), Ronaldo(Portugal) and 11 other players from 11 different countries using Samsung’s devices to prepare their battle against aliens. The video is quite entertaining and interesting to watch especially for soccer fans.

 

This campaign will be successful as it created a branded entertainment by creating a dream soccer team that only existed in people’s fantasy. Furthermore, Samsung recognized the importance of the sense of belongings when cheering for the same team and instead of separating people by countries, Samsung united them all under the name of Galaxy. Samsung certainly boosted their brand visibility to soccer fans all around the globe and the campaign will be even more successful as the World Cup nears.  

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Meijer Find-It App - Woman Using App In Grocery Store - YouTube

Shows Meijer's Find-it App in use by woman in grocery store. The mobile mapping and search technology is from Point Inside: http://www.pointinside.com
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Mobile and in motion comes together in this app: Instead of getting lost and pacing from corner to corner back and forth in the groceries store, Meijer app maps your route according to your shopping list. Neat. I can't wait until this idea gets an AR make-over.

 

According to the book Youtility, this app created an extra profit for the company and increased customer loyalty by 65%.

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