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Marketing in Motion
Marketing practice is rapidly changing. This topic explores the latest trends in marketing communications, digital and mobile marketing, social media, community / tribal marketing and value co-creation.
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Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
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How Levi's Turned A Design Evil Into A Design Signature

How Levi's Turned A Design Evil Into A Design Signature | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Ever wonder why the trademark symbol on the Levi's logo is clipped off?
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

A nice video how Levi's re-designed its brand identity via rooting its new, unified logo into it's historical assets found on every jeans. Its a bit strange to hear that the Levi's guys wanted to focus on their brand meaning and be consistent in their logo, and in the next sentence they call their new logo "bat wing" – sorry guys, that introduces a whole new set of brand associations that I don't think make it focus down. Don't get me wrong, the idea of the logo is great, but the brands you aspire to are known for their close connection to their symbol: Apple symbol. Nike swoosh. Levi's batwing? You had such a good start, using the historically formed shaped so that your logo can be subtly incorporated and reinforced in lots of your products (e.g., the pocket flaps on shirts). So why not Levi's flap? Levi's wave? Anything that helps us focus on Levi's, not Batman?

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You're richer than you think

You're richer than you think | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Scotiabank's tag line is the most recognized among banks in Canada, with an 85% recall among consumers — a little controversy can sometimes be a good thing, perhaps

Via David Warnke
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:
David Warnke's insight:

Scotiabank's 'You're richer than think' tagline pays off

 

It's my love-hate relationship with Scotiabank (love their mortgage rates, hate their service) that pulled me to investigate their all too commonly known "you're richer than you think" marketing campaign. The 2012 article by Holly Shaw published in the Financial Post showed the bank's marketing campaign is shifting its focus slightly from the Boomers to the Generation Xers. 

 

The article highlights some of the early controversy of the marketing campaign's tagline, in particular with the Millennials, shown when the odd one threw a beverage in theatres during the recession. There was reason for the frustration; in 2009, youth unemployment was reported around 15%, close to double the national unemployment rate. Scotiabank quickly adjusted the campaign's focus to emphasize the bank can help maximize ones' dollars. This message resonates with all generations, in particular the Boomers who hold the bulk of Canada's savings, as many are approaching or in retirement. Scotiabank's persistence to stay the course with the tagline and shift the marketing plan paid off, despite a little controversy.

 

It appears the time (2012) was right for another shift in the marketing campaign focus. The article highlights the fact that the Canadian banking sector is stable and reliable, which makes it hard for customers to distinguish between brands. Therefore, banks need to distinguish themselves beyond rates. Scotiabank's new approach was to redefine wealth in terms of relationships and experiences, both of which resonant better with Xers and Millennials. The focus on experience is an approach that MasterCard has embraced. A competing brand, the Toronto-Dominion Bank (TD), has also recognized the requirement to go beyond rates, with marketing focused on providing longer hours and better service. By focusing on relationships and experiences, Scotiabank is hoping to emotionally connect with its clientele, an assured method of sustaining the bank's prosperity. 

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David Warnke's curator insight, January 25, 7:09 PM

Scotiabank's 'You're richer than think' tagline pays off

 

It's my love-hate relationship with Scotiabank (love their mortgage rates, hate their service) that pulled me to investigate their all too commonly known "you're richer than you think" marketing campaign. The 2012 article by Holly Shaw published in the Financial Post showed the bank's marketing campaign is shifting its focus slightly from the Boomers to the Generation Xers. 

 

The article highlights some of the early controversy of the marketing campaign's tagline, in particular with the Millennials, shown when the odd one threw a beverage in theatres during the recession. There was reason for the frustration; in 2009, youth unemployment was reported around 15%, close to double the national unemployment rate. Scotiabank quickly adjusted the campaign's focus to emphasize the bank can help maximize ones' dollars. This message resonates with all generations, in particular the Boomers who hold the bulk of Canada's savings, as many are approaching or in retirement. Scotiabank's persistence to stay the course with the tagline and shift the marketing plan paid off, despite a little controversy.

 

It appears the time (2012) was right for another shift in the marketing campaign focus. The article highlights the fact that the Canadian banking sector is stable and reliable, which makes it hard for customers to distinguish between brands. Therefore, banks need to distinguish themselves beyond rates. Scotiabank's new approach was to redefine wealth in terms of relationships and experiences, both of which resonant better with Xers and Millennials. The focus on experience is an approach that MasterCard has embraced. A competing brand, the Toronto-Dominion Bank (TD), has also recognized the requirement to go beyond rates, with marketing focused on providing longer hours and better service. By focusing on relationships and experiences, Scotiabank is hoping to emotionally connect with its clientele, an assured method of sustaining the bank's prosperity. 

 

David Warnke

Suggested by Jean-Luc Rioux
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Nurse Next Door revamps brand image | Marketing Magazine

Nurse Next Door revamps brand image | Marketing Magazine | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

 

 

http://www.marketingmag.ca/news/marketer-news/nurse-next-door-revamps-brand-image-39099

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdGM7htvlsQ

 

In late 2011, Marketing Mag published an article from the VP of Marketing at Nurse Next door (NND) about revamping the company’s image.  NND realized that it could stand out from its competitors with a brand refresh that portrays both the company and its clients as vibrant, fun loving and caring.  The company is a home healthcare service that operates franchises in all majors Canadian cities (except Quebec) and is increasing its presence in the United States.  NND is somewhat of an anomaly in the home health care industry, which tends to be dominated by small, localized companies.

 

Jean-Luc Rioux's insight:

 

On the demographic side, NND’s marketing effort is focused on baby boomers that account for about one-third of Canada’s population, who control over 50 percent of the country’s wealth.  These baby boomers want to live life to the fullest and think young no matter how old they are.  NND new branding resonates particularly well with this market segment as the services offered by the company make seniors’ lives better enabling them to stay in their home.

 

NND positions themselves apart from the competition by truly understanding the marketplace and the customer needs.  In addition to the physical needs such as food preparation services and personal support, NND goes beyond expectations by meeting social and self-fulfillment needs.  As seen on the video, how many healthcare companies would go the extra miles and bring their patients’ swimming?  NND is all about answering the customer’s need and they will bend over backward to make the senior’s dream a reality.

 

In a world of fierce competition, NND has positioned themselves as a brand leader in the Home health care industry and as the baby-boomer grow older, they are poised to continue their massive success for years to come.

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Suggested by Maury Rubin
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Research In Motion rebrands itself as BlackBerry

Research In Motion rebrands itself as BlackBerry | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

At today's (Jan 30th) BlackBerry 10 launch event, CEO Thorsten Heins announced that his company formally known as RIM would now be rebranded as BlackBerry. This announcement is a giant leap for RIM...BlackBerry as its market share has been steadily dwindling since the release of Apple's IPhone 5 and Samsung's S3. This rebranding represents a shift in BlackBerry's market positioning and strategy as it was formally positioned against its competitors as the premier business phone. By offering the most natural typing experience on its QWERTY keyboards and its optimized security settings, BlackBerry phones were the obvious choice for business men, yet the direction of this new brand and vision could be detrimental to what made a BlackBerry appealing to their target market. In addition to rebranding their company, BlackBerry announced that the Z10 ( BlackBerry's fully touch integrated Smart Phone competing directly against the IPhone 5 and Samsung S3) would be ready for a mid march release, however they will be releasing another model of the phone, still equipped with a QWERTY keyboard, in April. Bloggers on the Tech site CNet questioned BlackBerry's motives for delaying the release of the Q10 asking, "why isn't' the keyboard rocking BlackBerry Q10 coming out sooner?" This marketing strategy could possibly be very discouraging for the hardcore BlackBerry enthusiasts. In an attempt to capture the largest possible amount of consumers in the Smartphone market, BlackBerry is failing to address the core fans who built their loyalty around the original interface.  The BlackBerry experience has largely been defined by its keyboard feature and this strategy to delay the release of the Q10 largely isolates the BlackBerry users who have stuck with BlackBerry through thick and thin. This rebranding effort is definitely keeping BlackBerry fresh and relevant, though it is very inconsistent with their previous market offering. Maribel Lopez, an analyst for Lopez Research noted, "What BlackBerry is missing is the opportunity to grab the keyboard users that desperately want an alternative to touch screens."

 

(Maury Rubin,06206586, COMM 335 - 002, brand equity, rebranding, Brand threats, consumer relationship) 

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Maury Rubin's comment, February 2, 2013 2:45 PM
Following up my claims, BlackBerry released a picture on their Facebook asking "Poll: Will you be picking up the NEW BlackBerry 10 smartphone? "Share" for YES" and they received an overwhelming response. If BlackBerry does some social listening they will see many responses similar to "Mercedes Green" who is unsure whether she is ready to jump to touch technology and others who have dismissed BlackBerry Z10 as an IPhone ripoff http://postimage.org/image/tzonkhkq7/
Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, February 3, 2013 1:41 PM
Now lets compare this to previous product launches... maybe Sony's hybrid between CD and cassette (mini disk???) in the late 90s early 2000s. There wasn't such a fast feedback available, and it was a long and at the end unsuccessful battle for Sony to get adopted. Now, does the fast feedback from social media makes marketing easier or harder?
Suggested by Maury Rubin
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Child of the 90s | Internet Explorer

Internet explorer is back and is trying to rope you back in with nostalgia. Beware!

 

In recent a marketing campaign to premier IE 10, Microsoft emphasizes the previous out datedness and horrible interface of Internet Explorer in order to entice users to return to the internet stone age or as I would call it, Internet BCE (Before Chrome Existed). I couldn’t help but read into the IE 10 phenomenon after Microsoft's' "Child of the 90's" video premiered on January 23rd and is now being crammed into ever orifice of my social feed. Hitting on all the 90's nostalgic sweet spots, Microsoft reminds us all of how terrible our sense of style was and how technological inept we used to be. Don’t you miss fanny packs? Floppy disks? Pogs? Of course you don’t, if you did, you would go pick them up at your local...where can you even buy floppy disks? The YouTube video is clearly targeted at the now grown up Generation Y who ACTUALLY grew up in the 90's. Sorry friends who were born in '91 '92 and most definitely '93 but you did NOT grow up in the 90's you were merely born in the 90's. Knowing what Pogs are or indulging in a chuckle about dial up internet does not mean you experienced the very significant tech boom that occurred in the mid 90's. I currently live with a student who is a product of generation Y and he has reminisced on loading Napster to his home computer on a floppy disk. Now that's old school. Gen Y'ers were the first, true technological pioneers who roamed around in the great uncertainty of the developing internet with Internet Exploerer as their navigational tool. Microsoft's great ingenious was to monopolize the browser market by packaging all of their PCs with Internet Explorer which forced our sad and misguided travelers to familiarize themselves with a low quality, low security web browser. Now that there is a swatch of better browser choices IE has essentially been lost in the shuffle and its subsequent upgrades are comparable to beating a dead horse. My favourite aspect of this new campaign is that Microsoft is aware of how bad IE has been in the past in both accessibility and functionality and is now trying to rebrand IE as an actual operational product. On the IE tumblr's About section, Microsoft writes "some people are trying the new Internet Explorer and actually liking it. Not that they would say that out loud." I feel as if there should be a question mark after that sentence. People are liking IE? The sections of the blog are split up into the headings "It's Good Now" and "No, Really" because Microsoft knows people have come to shudder at the very sound of IE. The fact remains that Microsoft has lost a huge share of the internet browser market and PC owners usually can't wait to install a different browser right off the get go; however, Microsoft refuses to part with their IE brand. Instead they have chosen to leverage their negative brand image and revitalized their offering in what appears to be a dare to the consumers. Another feature of the tumblr challenges users to hate IE 10, "still love to hate Internet Explorer? Or are you pleasantly surprised? Send us an email of what you think."

 

There are so many things I hate about Internet explorer (at least previous versions), it’s an unsafe, bug riddled and worst of all SLOW browser but maybe Microsoft actually took the time to optimize the browser for its debut on Windows 8. I for one am a skeptic and more than willing to knock it before I try it.As a non windows 8 user, I would not benefit from the gimmicky additions to the browser. Microsoft clearly had touch and swipe gestures in mind while developing IE 10, "Everything you want to do on the web is a swipe, tap or click away", "Flip ahead through web content on a site by simply swiping across the page. Pin sites to the start screen".

 

The moral of this story is that a brand is only as valuable as its recall value. In what appears to be a completely new product Microsoft has not dropped the name Internet Explorer because it carries a significant amount of social meaning and brand equity. Instead of trying to develop a new brand, Microsoft is playing on IE's nostalgic feeling to reconnect with old users and hopefully win new ones by egging them on to try to hate what Microsoft believes to be a better product.

 

(Maury Rubin,06206586, COMM 335 - 002, brand equity, marketing campaign,positioning,consumer attitude, ABC model,)

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Differentiate Or Die: Boring Banks Need Brand Personalities

Differentiate Or Die: Boring Banks Need Brand Personalities | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Consumers view most banking brands as undesirable and undifferentiated, making the battle cry ‘Differentiate or Die’ more relevant than ever for financial institutions.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

This article explores the banking industry, which is one of the most undifferentiated industries. Most banks score similar on consumers' perceptions, with virtually identical brand personalities that emphasize being organized, serious and sensible. 

Maybe it is time for banks to think about adopting some more unique brand positionings and personalities, as outside competition is a very real risk. For example, think about how Google Wallet is already eating into the banks' bread and butter business (electronic cash), and how PayPal has transformed the way we transfer money. And lets not forget peer-to-peer lending!

 

In order to stay competitive, banks have to become more focused on delivering value to their customers that goes beyond functional aspects such as low interest rates and long opening hours. They have to build relationships with consumers that are built on a shared purpose, excitement, and positive experiences. Here are four things the author of this article suggests banks to focus on:

 

Have Clarity of Purpose – Have an inspiring purpose that goes beyond financial transactions and makes a real difference in people’s lives.Inspire Connections – Focus on winning people’s hearts, not just their wallets.Focus on the Future – Harness technology to help re-invent people’s money lives.Create Experiences – Use every touch point to reinforce your brand’s purpose and personality.
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Sophie SAARTAVE's curator insight, February 14, 3:43 AM

A good survey showing that the old-age perception of the bank to be "conservative" in order to "credible" is no longer relevant with their customer's expectations

Suggested by Cynthia MacEachern
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This Is An 'NSA-Proof' Smartphone

This Is An 'NSA-Proof' Smartphone | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Silent Circle has identified a recent significant social concern and is using it to promote a new product.  Consumers today are increasingly dissatisfied with the way that personal data is being collected about our daily lives through our interaction with the internet, and particularly now our use of smartphones.  In response, Silent Circle and hardware partner Geeksphone are making the Blackphone. 

 

The Blackphone will compete with other top smartphones including Apple and Samsung in terms of functionality, price, and style, but it offers the promise of online and mobile anonymity.  It is this hook of regaining lost privacy that Silent Circle is using in this very sophisticated culturally based marketing campaign.  The campaign itself will feature traditional and social media elements.  There will be a product launch in Barcelona; interest is being raised through online technical forums, and Silent Circle plans the use of webinars, direct mail and email campaigns, and online and social media advertising. 

 

What is interesting from a marketing perspective is the focus on dystopian loss of privacy and new sense of exposure that we feel today.  Silent Circle’s strategy; it’s tag lines, YouTube videos, and public interviews focus much more on the social threat  than on the functional bells and whistles that will be part of the Blackphone. This cultural capital trickle down approach to marketing focuses on a new and disturbing social trend and aims to hook many users with the idea of a return to a place of lost security and anonymity that many had thought might be a thing of the past.  The strategy leans heavily on the Edward Snowdon incident which might have been a social catalyst for the right to privacy and a turning point in our cultural direction.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Really interesting! This company does a great job of grasping the opportunity that is presented in the NSA scandal

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Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, February 12, 12:34 PM
From a Holt and Cameron "Cultural Strategy" (2010) perspective, I however would argue that this is more a strategy of provoking ideological flashpoints than a trickling down of cultural capital. But otherwise very interesting to link this to this book!
Suggested by Sonya Gleeson
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My Tide TV Commercial - Tide Dad Long Version

In 2011, Proctor and Gamble took a bold approach to marketing the new Tide plus Boost laundry detergent. This product is a line extension onto the already widely successful Tide brand, which has traditionally been targeted towards women. However, with more men than ever staying at home with kids and a clear fundamental change in gender role stereotypes, P&G leveraged a unique consumer insight to target this particular campaign at the stay-at-home father. This campaign used humour to bridge an emotional connection with consumers. Household packaged goods have traditionally taken a rational approach to marketing, in which the benefits of the product are conveyed in an attempt to convince consumers of some superior product quality, however this type of message has turned these products into somewhat of a commodity. By utilizing an emotional connection to build liking and preference for the brand, P&G has been able to provide a message that will create a deeper connection with the brand and prevent it from being anything but a commodity. 

 

Sonya Gleeson -335(2) -06024420

"Dad-vertising", emotional marketing, targeting, liking and preference

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Suggested by Anna Wallin
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"Gardener" - Diet Coke Advert - Director's Cut

Diet Coke is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year by returning the famous Diet Coke hunk in its “sparkling together for 30 years” campaign. The iconic break ad - one of the best recalled in history - was first aired in 1994, gaining immediate success and becoming a cultural phenomenon by flipping traditional gender roles on their head. The thought behind the original ad, starring a hunky construction worker who keeps a group of admiring women glued to their office window every day at lunch time when he pauses for a can of Diet Coke, was to create ritual in people’s lives and a real lifestyle brand. Now he is back, "sexier than ever".


Diet Coke is the second biggest soft drink brand globally, with a value of over $11 billion. Last year the company’s revenue dropped by 8 per cent in Europe in the late summer months. With the help of the fourth Diet Coke hunk and a number of other ads celebrating the brand’s history, the brand now looks to its past to retain its ‘lifestyle’ status. By going back to its roots and “putting the brand at the heart of  its stories in a fashionable, 21st century way”, it seeks to revitalize the "true Diet Coke experience", especially by aiming at a younger audience and those, who may not remember the original campaigns.

 

Having concentrated mainly on fashion in its marketing in the 2000’s, cooperating with designers such as Karl Lagerfeld and John Paul Gaultier, it is going to be interesting to see what the effects of a modern Diet Coke hunk ad will be. Will women respond to it in the same way as in the 90’s? Consistency being one of the most important aspects of a strong brand, especially regarding its positioning, it is highly important for a brand to remain loyal to its heritage, yet keep it fresh as well.
 

(Anna Wallin, 10083285, COMM 335-2, brand positioning, lifestyle brand, commercial)

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Nice to see this ad coming back. But again, I think we through the term lifestyle brand and lifestyle position around too carelessly. I think this is rather an emotional appeal.

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