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Marketing in Motion
Marketing practice is rapidly changing. This topic explores the latest trends in marketing communications, digital and mobile marketing, social media, community / tribal marketing and value co-creation.
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Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
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Viral Marketing: The Carrie Telekinetic Coffee Shop Surprise Prank

Viral Marketing: The Carrie Telekinetic Coffee Shop Surprise Prank | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
How ThinkModo did viral marketing for the movie Carrie this 2013. Learn from them on how you can apply on the principles they use on making your brand viral.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

 

By James Donnelly:

 

The Marketing Trend considered for the 2nd review was the viral marketing campaign promoting the Carrie movie. A shop was altered for a telekinetic prank, with intent for video to ‘go viral’ to promote the weekend movie release.  Viral marketing uses a preexisting distribution network (such as a social network) to achieve marketing goals through a self-replicating process that is akin to a physical virus (flu or IT).  The intent of a viral campaign is to acquire disproportionate publicity far in excess of traditional marketing.


The primary intent of any campaign is to support the success of the product it is promoting.  In order to be successful, the viral campaign should:


1) Be like an actual virus, in that it can be easily replicated and spread.


a) The idea needs to be new, engaging and easy to search for or pass along.

b) The idea should be newsworthy to get supporting distribution from traditional media, often free.

c) Exceptional content to attract and retain the initial audience.

d) Appeal to influencers - those individuals that promote and sustain the product.

e) Make the virus contagious and easy to spread.  In this case, a link to the video is easily disseminated by the influencers.


2) Make it trigger strong emotions:  Tie-ins to emotion increase the likelihood of individuals spreading it.


3) Make it interesting and drive engagement.


Measured virally, this video was successful with 37M Youtube views in the 1st week, currently 54M views and 12,000 search results.  From a movie success view, the movie only grossed $35M domestically and an opening weekend of just $16M.  The extraordinary success of the viral campaign does not necessarily turn into a commercial success – conversely, this illustrates that a successful viral campaign can lack the tie-in to a product.

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Nicholas Wallace's curator insight, May 7, 2014 4:51 AM

A shop was altered for a telekinetic prank, with intent for video to ‘go viral’ to promote the weekend movie release.  Viral marketing uses a preexisting distribution network (such as a social network) to achieve marketing goals through a self-replicating process that is akin to a physical virus (flu or IT).  The intent of a viral campaign is to acquire disproportionate publicity far in excess of traditional marketing.

 

The primary intent of any campaign is to support the success of the product it is promoting.  In order to be successful, the viral campaign should:

 

1) Be like an actual virus, in that it can be easily replicated and spread.

 

a) The idea needs to be new, engaging and easy to search for or pass along.

b) The idea should be newsworthy to get supporting distribution from traditional media, often free.

c) Exceptional content to attract and retain the initial audience.

d) Appeal to influencers - those individuals that promote and sustain the product.

e) Make the virus contagious and easy to spread.  In this case, a link to the video is easily disseminated by the influencers.

 

2) Make it trigger strong emotions:  Tie-ins to emotion increase the likelihood of individuals spreading it.

 

3) Make it interesting and drive engagement.

 

Measured virally, this video was successful with 37M Youtube views in the 1st week, currently 54M views and 12,000 search results.  From a movie success view, the movie only grossed $35M domestically and an opening weekend of just $16M.  The extraordinary success of the viral campaign does not necessarily turn into a commercial success – conversely, this illustrates that a successful viral campaign can lack the tie-in to a product.

Suggested by Ben Keefe
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Report: Google Glass Was the Clear Winner of SXSWi Buzz

Report: Google Glass Was the Clear Winner of SXSWi Buzz | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Google Glass. It’s the latest product that is re-inventing the way consumers use, or in this case, wear technology. The buzz surrounding Google’s latest gadget was all the talk of South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive – a set of festivals that takes place annually in Austin, Texas, and took place from March 8-17 this year.

 

The social media conversations and corresponding attention from media has provided Google with the platform it will need come the launch of the product later in 2013. This strong utilization of public relations (including earned “buzz” through social media and strong media relations) is a perfect example of how companies can capitalize on reviews and consumer interest and conversations; this is highly similar to what Apple did in 2007 with the launch of the iPhone. By taking advantage of the “newsworthy event” that SXSW is, which caters to an audience who would be interested in Google Glass, Google will be able to save on advertising by relying on the incredible buzz created by the festival. 

 

While this is incredibly successful, going forward Google may struggle to measure the impressions and effect of this type of awareness generation – due to its lack of control when compared to advertising. However, for the time being, Google has mastered the art of consumer-generated buzz.

Ben Keefe, 05993950, Comm335-02, publicrelations, sxsw, productlaunch, socialmedia, buzz

 

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Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
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Video: The Commercial Campus

Video: The Commercial Campus | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Corporations are hiring popular students to promote their brand on campus.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

This NYT video gives a glimpse into the world of brand ambassadors and buzz marketing. Far beyond just handing out free stuff on campus, but also offering a helping hand when moving in, throwing a party at Target, posting on facebook, and much more.

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Suggested by Kevin Hastey
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Nvidia crop circle marketing stunt gets attention

Nvidia crop circle marketing stunt gets attention | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
A chip maker's plot to draw attention to a new product had people scratching their heads and looking for UFOs

 

Not sure if this is how I do this, I can get it to post with the insight tag on my own page, but I don't seem to get that option here.

 

This is a strong example of using mystery and the main stream media to do your marketing for you and at little cost. 

 

The level of detail in the crop circle plays on people who believe that “aliens” are out there to drive the story and because of the buzz create by those who are alien visitor believers, main stream media outlets like CNN which cater to people’s desire to believe in the weird and wonderful quickly hopped onboard with the story giving it international attention. http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/01/us/california-crop-circle-gone/

 

It is also an effective campaign due to the many meanings of the number 192 that is written in braille in the crop circle design.  These possible meanings created further interest in the story as many individuals taking a preference as to which of the various meanings of the number were trying to be represented caused further attention in the media.

 

Adding to the buzz was the release of a YouTube video reportedly showing “aliens” creating the crop circle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eoz0QUYU45o

 

When the company Nvidia announced at the Consumer Electronics show that the crop circle was their work and was designed to promote the company’s newest chip for smart phones and tablets, the company was able to use all the publicity that the crop circle speculation and associated You tube video had created to effectively create a buzz about their company and its newest product prior to one of the world’s biggest electronics shows.

 

 http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_24853325/monterey-county-crop-circle-publicity-stunt-nvidia

 

The overall result is that Nvidia was able to be the buzz company at the start of the show and it created the effect at little cost by pandering to those who believe in the improbable and the main stream media’s desire to get the next big scoop!

 

This is my submission for Marketing trend #2

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Suggested by Rille Markgren
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Gamification – A new trend for companies to creating a buzz on social media.

Gamification – A new trend for companies to creating a buzz on social media. | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

One of the alternatives in media marketing these days that have the fastest growth is Buzz marketing. Buzz marketing, which is an area within Public relations, also called word-of-mouth marketing is reached when people is forwarding information about a product. The big benefit of Buzz marketing is that the credibility is significantly higher of word-of-mouth than of advertisements. It is also more powerful than when a spokesperson or an endorsers come with a similar type of information. (Clow, K. et. al. 2013.)

 

Gamification, is a trend with the idea to create buzz on social networks and through this build credibility for your product. Gamification engaging users in fun ways with for example contest that drives the traffic to your social channels such as Facebook. Companies can for example cooperate with a TV-channel to have a contest connected to a TV-show and in this way create a buzz about the company. The firm Bunchball did exactly this kind of cooperation with NBC network USA, and succeeded to double the traffic on their Facebook-page using gamification.

 

I think this article is interesting because I never heard about this concept before and I think it is good way to capture the audience, as well as building long-term relations. If I were responsible for the marketing for a company I would try to find a way to create a positive buzz about my products, and I think this can be an excellent way to accomplish that.  

 

Rickard Markgren, 10083119, COMM 335-1, Article, Public relations, Buzz marketing, Gamification, Social network.

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