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Marketing in Motion
Marketing practice is rapidly changing. This topic explores the latest trends in marketing communications, digital and mobile marketing, social media, community / tribal marketing and value co-creation.
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Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
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Apple Poised to Add Four Digital Agencies, Including Huge and AKQA

Apple Poised to Add Four Digital Agencies, Including Huge and AKQA | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Apple is set to hire four digital agencies, including WPP's AKQA and Interpublic Group's Huge, as well as small indie shops Area 17 and Kettle
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Apple is rather timid when it comes to advertising, spending only less than one percent (0.644%, to be exact) of its sales on advertising in 2013. While its massive brand community and the love of the online and offline media adds a lot of earned and spontaneous exposure to Apple products, the rise of its new arch rival Samsung (on the mobile hardware side) means that Apple needs to step up its game.

 

It just did so by signing on four new ad agency, mainly small ones that focus on digital marketing campaign. Apple's CMO Phil Schiller had recently a fall-out with their main ad agency TBWA/Media Arts Labs, but this does not mean they are shifting gear there completely. 

 

What it means though is that Apple will become more aggressive when it comes to its digital and social media marketing strategy. And this is good. Apple has been too silent on this front for too long, too much relying on its vibrant brand community, and only recently have we seen some more focused effort on branching out into new communication media. For example, check out the tumblr backgrounds / themes that were introduced to boost iPhone 5C sales (also on Marketing in Motion).

 

Apple has to react to Samsung's higher spending and faster growth, even though Apple still leads by pretty much every metric, because the mobile market as a whole is transitioning into the maturation phase of its life cycle. Smart phone growth has flattened out (hence the need for cheaper 5C iPhones and larger screens in -most likely- iPhone 6). And while tablet computers are in my opinion still in the growth phase (see iPad 5 adoptions outpacing iPad 4 adoptions by the factor 4 or 5), competition is stiffening up in this market as well, with Samsung offering great options, and of course Microsoft, if they get the Surface finally right (which might be by now, I haven't checked out Surface 2 yet).

 

The article in Ad Age speaks towards this brand strategy aspect at the side: 

 

"As Samsung and Apple continue the fight for market share, Samsung marketing is clearly winning for consumer love, with its cool selfies and earned media strategy. It's a rivalry that would prompt any brand to change up its marketing approach and invest in digital marketing and social media support -- an area in which Apple has been less aggressive than its competitors."


This move might also tie in with Apple's acquisition of social media search engine Topsy that Apple made back in 2013 (or 2012?). At that time, no one really knew why Topsy changed hands, and some argued to boost recommendation engines in the iTunes store or something like this. However, I then thought that this might be part of Apple's strategy to bring some more social media listening expertise and power in-house, and the expansion in digital ad agency would nicely fit with this theory.

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GM Says Facebook Ads Don't Pay Off

GM Says Facebook Ads Don't Pay Off | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
In May 2012, Facebook was going to have its initial public offering (IPO). At the time, anything related was big news as the market was trying to assess the future value of the stock. What grabbed me about this story is its authors appeared to raise the question as to whether social media marketing was worth it? The internet has been praised for changing the marketing game, in particular with regard to its ability to enable companies to directly market to customers. One only has to look to Amazon for proof.In the spring of 2012, GM's frustrations over the assessed value of marketing on the social media site saw it pull out its paid advertising. One would think a $10 million dollar investment would yield some measurable results but everything is relative. This only represented a small portion of GM's $1.8 billion dollar advertising budget for 2011. For this relatively small investment, it begs the question why not give Facebook more time. By comparison, Kia Motors, who raised similar concerns, increased their budget.The frustrations GM had speaks to the fundamental challenges of marketing - how does a company measure its return on a marketing investment. While I was hoping for some significant insights on the value of social media marketing, limited were to be found in the article. One that I gleaned, however, is that it appears that GM persisted in trying to use the social media site as mass marketing tool rather than as tool to gain customer insights or strengthen the brand's image. As the article mentions, it is hard to ignore the fact that Facebook offers access to one of the largest audiences in the world. Maybe the most compelling evidence that social media marketing has value is the fact that GM has recently returned to Facebook as a paid advertiser.In May 2012, Facebook was going to have its initial public offering (IPO). At the time, anything related was big news as the market was trying to assess the future value of the stock. What grabbed me about this story is its authors appeared to raise the question as to whether social media marketing was worth it? The internet has been praised for changing the marketing game, in particular with regard to its ability to enable companies to directly market to customers. One only has to look to Amazon for proof.In the spring of 2012, GM's frustrations over the assessed value of marketing on the social media site saw it pull out its paid advertising. One would think a $10 million dollar investment would yield some measurable results but everything is relative. This only represented a small portion of GM's $1.8 billion dollar advertising budget for 2011. For this relatively small investment, it begs the question why not give Facebook more time. By comparison, Kia Motors, who raised similar concerns, increased their budget.The frustrations GM had speaks to the fundamental challenges of marketing - how does a company measure its return on a marketing investment. While I was hoping for some significant insights on the value of social media marketing, limited were to be found in the article. One that I gleaned, however, is that it appears that GM persisted in trying to use the social media site as mass marketing tool rather than as tool to gain customer insights or strengthen the brand's image. As the article mentions, it is hard to ignore the fact that Facebook offers access to one of the largest audiences in the world. Maybe the most compelling evidence that social media marketing has value is the fact that GM has recently returned to Facebook as a paid advertiser.General Motors plans to stop advertising on Facebook after determining its paid ads had little impact on consumers. The news comes just days ahead of Facebook's IPO.

Via David Warnke
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Insight by David Warnke:

 

In May 2012, Facebook was going to have its initial public offering (IPO). At the time, anything related was big news as the market was trying to assess the future value of the stock. What grabbed me about this story is its authors appeared to raise the question as to whether social media marketing was worth it? The internet has been praised for changing the marketing game, in particular with regard to its ability to enable companies to directly market to customers. One only has to look to Amazon for proof.

 

In the spring of 2012, GM's frustrations over the assessed value of marketing on the social media site saw it pull out its paid advertising. One would think a $10 million dollar investment would yield some measurable results but everything is relative. This only represented a small portion of GM's $1.8 billion dollar advertising budget for 2011. For this relatively small investment, it begs the question why not give Facebook more time. By comparison, Kia Motors, who raised similar concerns, increased their budget.The frustrations GM had speaks to the fundamental challenges of marketing - how does a company measure its return on a marketing investment. While I was hoping for some significant insights on the value of social media marketing, limited were to be found in the article. One that I gleaned, however, is that it appears that GM persisted in trying to use the social media site as mass marketing tool rather than as tool to gain customer insights or strengthen the brand's image. As the article mentions, it is hard to ignore the fact that Facebook offers access to one of the largest audiences in the world. Maybe the most compelling evidence that social media marketing has value is the fact that GM has recently returned to Facebook as a paid advertiser.

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David Warnke's curator insight, March 29, 6:39 AM

Wall Street Journal - Business

By Sharon Terlep, Suzanne Vranica and Shayndi Raice

Updated May 16, 2012 2:45 a.m. ET


In May 2012, Facebook was going to have its initial public offering (IPO). At the time, anything related was big news as the market was trying to assess the future value of the stock. What grabbed me about this story is its authors appeared to raise the question as to whether social media marketing was worth it? The internet has been praised for changing the marketing game, in particular with regard to its ability to enable companies to directly market to customers. One only has to look to Amazon for proof.

In the spring of 2012, GM's frustrations over the assessed value of marketing on the social media site saw it pull out its paid advertising. One would think a $10 million dollar investment would yield some measurable results but everything is relative. This only represented a small portion of GM's $1.8 billion dollar advertising budget for 2011. For this relatively small investment, it begs the question why not give Facebook more time. By comparison, Kia Motors, who raised similar concerns, increased their budget.The frustrations GM had speaks to the fundamental challenges of marketing - how does a company measure its return on a marketing investment. While I was hoping for some significant insights on the value of social media marketing, limited were to be found in the article. One that I gleaned, however, is that it appears that GM persisted in trying to use the social media site as mass marketing tool rather than as tool to gain customer insights or strengthen the brand's image. As the article mentions, it is hard to ignore the fact that Facebook offers access to one of the largest audiences in the world. Maybe the most compelling evidence that social media marketing has value is the fact that GM has recently returned to Facebook as a paid advertiser.

David Warnke

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The Van Damme Dividend? Volvo Truck Sales Rise 31% - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ

The Van Damme Dividend? Volvo Truck Sales Rise 31% - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Volvo Truck sales continued to rise in November, although it's too early to tell how well its recent round of attention-grabbing YouTube ads will convert into new customers.

 

In December 2013, the Wall Street journal published an article on a sudden 31% rise in sales of Volvo Truck in November compared to the same period last year.   Considering the economic times that remain challenging in the EU, this increase is significant for Volvo truck.

The company is uncertain whether the increase in sales has been influenced by new stricter European emission taking effect in 2014 or if the sale is associated with a series of six viral videos launched on YouTube, one of which including Mr. Jean-Claude Van Damme featuring an “Epic split” between two trucks to demonstrate Volvo new Dynamic Steering viewed by more than 60 million in less than three months.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7FIvfx5J10

 

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Jean-Luc Rioux:

 

Web only commercials are becoming a growing trend as it is more economical compared to TV advertisement and possibly more impactful.  For example, a Sunday night football add costs $600,000 and will reach about 15 million people.  The Van Damme ad has already reached four times this exposure for a total conception cost of less than a million dollars. Not only did the video go viral, it created a series of parodies, each of them exposing even more the Volvo brand in the process.

 

Using spectacular combination of music, scenery and a well-chosen actor, Volvo truck was able to go beyond the expected brand positioning of attributes and benefits associated with the technology of Volvo truck.  Instead, the on-line video generated a clear mental image of Volvo Truck beliefs and values which triggered strong emotions in a much larger audience than originally intended. 

 

Although Volvo truck hasn’t pinpointed the exact cause of the spike in sales, in my mind, anything that generates such a viral response on YouTube has to improve exposure of the brand and lead to sales. 

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What we’re trying to say is, if you don’t buy our stuff, you might be a wuss.

What we’re trying to say is, if you don’t buy our stuff, you might be a wuss. | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Jim Bean advertising

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Ishaan Srivastava:

 

Usually, marketing is perceived as no more than an attempt to appease consumer preferences. Companies allocate significant resources to researching consumer preferences, developing new products that meet these predilections and promoting them on an international level. Every now and then, however, companies attempt instead to mould consumer preferences. This series of advertisements by the bourbon giant, Jim Bean, prove a perfect case in hand.

 

Through the interwoven use of virile fetishization, shame based masculinity,  old west nostalgia and the “American Spirit”, the bourbon giant attempts to coerce their male customers into relinquishing other forms of alcohol in favour of the brand’s product, endeavouring to create loyal following of devout fans who would order the stuff reflexively and would rarely consider anything else. This goes in sync with other brands of whisky that ride the same bandwagon. 

 

The concept of selling masculinity is surprisingly a new one, taking its origins in the feminist movement and being further provoked by the increase of a metrosexual culture that is perceived as making sissies out of innocent boys, who care more about pocket squares and selfies they do about muscle cars or cast iron. An entire industry of media and marketing devoted to being the proverbial manly man has formed, incessantly asking one question: “Where have all the real men gone?”.

 

But where in the olden days masculinity had to be earned, now it can simply be purchased. By hitting that deep-seated desire to attain some bygone image of masculinity, companies can get consumers to purchase their goods on instinct, in an attempt to become a bacon-chomping, wood-chopping caricature of what being man used to mean.

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Super Bowl Ads 2014: Reviewing Leaked Commercials

Super Bowl Ads 2014: Reviewing Leaked Commercials | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Several companies have leaked their full-length advertisements for Super Bowl XLVIII ahead of FOX's Sunday, Feb. 2 broadcast...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Just three days before the event, this webpage reviews the already leaked Super Bowl ads, including some teasers that I am discussing in my other post on this board.

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The Rules To Play By: Gamification in marketing | Marketing Magazine

The Rules To Play By: Gamification in marketing | Marketing Magazine | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Marketing: It’s all about games!

 

Gamification is the “use of game thinking and game mechanics in non-game contexts to engage users in solving problems.  It is applied to improve user engagement, return on investment, data quality, timeliness, and learning (Wikipedia).”  In recent years, gamification has been widely applied in marketing to connect with consumers.

 

As highlighted in the article, gamification is not only about video games but also about using game mechanics such as reward offerings and “community status.”   The example of Foursquare was provided where badges were offered and members could become the mayor for frequently visiting a location.  Although gamification gained popularity since 2009, it is predicted that by 2014 80% of gamified applications will fail to meet business objectives due to poor designs.

 

In order to be successful, several recommendations were offered by senior executives in industry.  Firstly, the gamified application must use existing consumer behaviors and then reward it and not try to create new consumer behaviors.  Secondly, it must provide meaningful rewards for consumers and must offer high value propositions.  Thirdly and I would offer the most important, the brand must understand its customers and provide an experience that makes them want to participate more.  It was also suggested that the brand must focus on the experience with the product as opposed to the product itself. 

 

In all recommendations above, the consumer is the focus with a clear understanding of wants and needs.  In addition, the consumer experience must be considered in order to create a successful application.  With a sizeable gaming market, it is expected that gamification will continue to be a major trend in marketing.  Not just a trend in itself, gamification represents a fusion of four marketing trends: social media usage, the mobile revolution, big data in marketing, and wearable computer gadgets.

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Latest Horror-Movie Ad Prank, With a Screaming Devil Baby, Is Completely Messed Up

Latest Horror-Movie Ad Prank, With a Screaming Devil Baby, Is Completely Messed Up | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Here's one baby that no one's expecting.

 

Steve Neta's insight:

This video caught my attention as it made national news headlines across North America today. Call it marketing, a publicity stunt, a bad prank – or as some in the marketing world call it, “prankvertising”. It creates some good food for thought. The prank was staged in New York City and it tempted the good will of passers-by with what appeared to be an abandoned baby carriage. When a good Samaritan checks on the carriage, the “Devil Baby” sits up and screams at him or her – at times the remote-controlled carriage would chase them as well.

 

At face value, this prank achieved what was intended – it got people across the continent talking about the stunt and linked it to the movie, Devil’s Due. However, it raises an interesting question in these types of marketing “stunts”: How much is too much?

 

On one hand, video of this prank went viral and drew a ton of publicity. On the other hand, it took unsuspecting well-meaning people and gave them quite a scare – all while filming it to be later shown to the world. David Gianatsio of AdWeek notes that these efforts “can be invasive, sadistic and potentially risky.” The risks can be many because, as Gianatsio’s article points out, reactions from non-actors can be real. There are risks in people getting hurt, legal liabilities, and causing traumatic consequences.

 

There are friendlier versions of prankvertising, but what is the true value in stunts that trade on fear and verge on obscenity? One cannot deny that they attract attention – in just one day, “Devil Baby Attack” has garnered nearly 16.5 million views. What really needs to be considered is “how much is too much?” There can be a fine line to walk between getting attention and being offensive.

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Iunisi Vaiaku's curator insight, March 18, 9:01 PM

A approach the horror film industry is trying to market out horror films. Good article about the ethical side to how much is too far for advertisers and especially for this case with devil baby! Being punished for being morally good??

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Scotiabank targets young adults with NFC poster campaign - NFC World

Scotiabank targets young adults with NFC poster campaign - NFC World | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Scotiabank’s Scene summer campaign is using state-of-the-art marketing technology to target Toronto’s young adults and movie enthusiasts. 

Near-Field Communication, or NFC, is a relatively new technology, which you may be familiar with in the form of your Credit Card’s Tap technology.  In essence, NFC is the interaction between a chip implanted in things (credit card or a NFC smart poster/ad), and an electronic device (supermarket payment terminal or cell phone). 

The Summer Scene Campaign, which used NFC technology, provided Toronto’s young adults and movie enthusiasts the opportunity to win or earn movie tickets by Tapping or Scanning one of the 80 Scene Smart Posters around Toronto with their NFC enabled phones.  This is helping to create a stronger relationship with their tech-savvy young adult consumers.  The posters also provided directions to the nearest Scotiabank, where consumers could sign up for a Scene card, which in turn would capture more value for Scotiabank. 

Samsung has signed a deal with NFC to include a built-in NFC reader in their new line of phones; NFC is currently working a similar deal with Apple. 

In Japan they are using NFC to allow customers to ‘like’ things via an interactive bracelet, just by swiping it against a product.  They are also using NFC to personalize ads, as individuals walk past a NFC smart board, there is a quick exchange of data, and the board posts a customized ad for that individual. 

Here in North America, Wired Magazine featured an NFC Lexus ad, where you can place your NFC enabled phone onto the magazine, and then use it to navigate Lexus’ internal navigation/audio system.  There are countless ways that this technology can be used, but I’d like to see it used in malls, to quickly upload maps and discounts to my iPhone. 

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British Airways Digital Billboards Know When A Plane Is Flying Overhead

British Airways Digital Billboards Know When A Plane Is Flying Overhead | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Kids on the billboards stand up and point at the plane as it flies by.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Out-of-door advertising is one of the fastest growing medium for advertising, and one of the main the reason for this is the new possibilities that opened up with digital billboards (and people can fast-forward TV commercials, but they still have to walk outside in the same speed). These digital billboards allow for a much more interactive approach to marketing and advertising, and one great example is presented in this video. I wonder how many different scenarios BA came up with for looking up into the sky. Great job!

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Brigitte Chevallier's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:44 AM

bluffant. Le message personnalisé qui s'affiche lorsqu'on passe devant le panneau digital sera bientôt une réalité . philipp K Dick 

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Honda is trying to reach a broader segment

This advertisement for the new Honda Civic tries to use two different perspective about value of a car. Some people buys a car because they need it for their family, so the car need to be roomy, safe and should also have a high grade of comfort. Others want their car to have the latest performance features, with high technology and great power. Honda claims that their new Civic has both, and this shows in their advertising by using a 180 degree turn to show the car advantages from both of these perspectives. In order to strengthen this argument the voiceover says "Power or practical? Agile or efficient? Why does it have to be one or the other? Why can’t you just have both?”. In advertising, they also want to point out that the car is modern in that it is fuel efficient and in this way the company shows that they think about the environment. Many competitors in the car industry wants to have a specific niche of their products, but Honda tries to view for the audience that you can buy Honda Civic both if you want the latest technology or if you want a safe car for your family.

 

The decision-making process for cars contains both emotional and rational components. You can use a rational appeal in all the levels in the Hierarchy of effects model: Awareness, knowledge, liking, preference, conviction and purchase. (Clow, K. et. al. 2013.) In this commercial for Honda Civic they use a rational element on the knowledge level. In the commercial the consumers get knowledge about the product (the car) both through pictures and by the voice-over. The voice-over also try to give the audience preferences about the product and in this way convict the audience that Honda Civic is a good alternative for purchase. The way that they show all the great features the car has is something that Clow et. al. (2013) call Performance appeals.

 

The commercial has also an emotional appeal. The commercial is trying to build up a trust that the car has a good security for the people who will travel in it. The commercial also shows a person driving the car who looks happy with his car, and this is a good way to get the audience to get good feelings about the brand.

 

Rickard Markgren, 10083119, COMM 335-1, Campaign, Rational appeal, Emotional appeal, Hierachy of effects.

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Art, Copy & Code : Re-imagine advertising

Every year in Spring (usually in March), the South by Southwest Festival (SXSW) is organized; it is a set of film, interactive, and music festivals and conferences that take place in Austin, Texas. These past few years, it became a staple event where many start-up businesses stand out like Twitter, Foursquare or Instagram. All the entrepreneurs of the new technologies industry and all financial investors gather to discover the newest evolutions that will shake up the digital world within the next months.

The third day of SXSW was marked by a major announcement from Google, which launched a new digital movement: Art, Copy and Code, an advertising improvement which combines creativity, contents and technology.

Nowadays, the advertising industry cannot be only limited to images and text. In a highly-connected world, brands have vast and diverse spaces to spread their messages and values. The advertising industry moved over to “connected digital experiences”, based on technology and data. A change of paradigm that Google has just given a name to: Art, Copy, Code.

Technology and creativity cannot exist apart from each other anymore. It is no longer time for simple and traditional advertisement but for digital products which can provoke feelings, enjoyment and innovation for all consumers.

 

A good illustration for Art, Copy & Code is provided in the video featured above. Google created a shoe – in collaboration with Adidas, YesYesNo, and advertising agency 72andSunny – which is able to shout at its owner when he/she is being lazy, or motivate him/her when he/she is being active. According to Mike Glaser, marketing lead from Art, Copy & Code at Google, the aim of the shoes is to bring the idea of advertising to multiple creative forms, including the everyday objects around us. By connecting a pair of sneakers to the web, Google is able to create unique opportunities between physical objects in the real world and digital ad spaces, he says.

 

Thuy Anh Nguyen, 10081293, COMM 335-002: SXSW, Google, advertising, technology, digital, involvement, emotions

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FIRST LOOK: Cool Stuff Inside Twitter's New Advertising Interface

FIRST LOOK: Cool Stuff Inside Twitter's New Advertising Interface | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
You can now buy Twitter ads to augment or hijack TV ad campaigns.

 

Although Twitter is widely recognized as a marketing communication tool, it is also seen as a conversation that is dominated and steered by consumers, rather than brands, as they can reject, ignore and shape what are the "trending" topics. This article touches on the idea of integrating brands even more into the 'conversation' that happens on Twitter, with real-time ad buying relative to ongoing world topics. This is an amazing tool for media buyers, and media planners as this shortens the ad-buying process and allows for instant connections to consumers. However, there is the potential to estrange Twitter users as brands may start to dominate the 'conversation'. There is also the potential for media buyers to get too ‘trigger-happy’ and start buying against strategic goals, alienating the target market. 

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Sophia Lal's comment, March 19, 2013 10:00 AM
Sophia Lal | 06095727 | COMM 335 -2 | twitter, social media, advertising, media planning
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Huge Bear Surprises Crew on EcoBubble Photo Shoot in BC

Similar to the Polar bear Nissan Leaf ad we watched in class (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VT_3xtI2kvM), there is no doubt that Samsung has used satire in the ad to bring attention to their washing machine with eco bubble technology. After watching this ad, I had to watch other videos that further explained this innovative technology (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MzLbFLuBms). Did the advertisement capture the audience in a creative manner? Absolutely. Did the advertisement capture the audience in a strategic way? I would beg to differ. I felt like the ad did not mention the bubbles as well as the energy saving capabilities as two of the key features of this washing machine. With no major changes to the exterior image of the washing machine, I felt like Samsung's creativity did not highlight the key attributes. What do you think?

 

(Jessica Louie, 06337096, Comm335-1, Advertisement, IMC, Youtube)

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As Nike releases World Cup 2014 commercial, a look at some of the best ads tied to soccer's biggest event

As Nike releases World Cup 2014 commercial, a look at some of the best ads tied to soccer's biggest event | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Nike, of course, is the reigning (if unofficial) champion of World Cup advertising for a sweeping, brilliant commercial from 2010
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Superbowl is one of the biggest advertising events every year. Fifa World Cup is on every four years. See the difference?

 

In an age where media fragmentation makes it ever harder to reach mass audiences, big sports events are some of the last prime spots left for advertisers. Companies are charged big bucks for running their ads during the breaks, and thus it is understandable that they seek to get the biggest bang for their buck as well.

 

In the last few years, advertisers during Superbowl have discovered that the ad game begins long before the real game kicks off, and they have launched their ads (or teasers for their ads) often weeks before. This year, it is no difference with the Fifa World Cup, as NIKE has just released its first teaser for their ad. 

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Charmin 'Rolls Out' Bold New Native Ad Campaign

Charmin 'Rolls Out' Bold New Native Ad Campaign | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Richelle Gaudet:

 

Confidence in traditional digital display advertising is quickly diminishing as consumers have become used to ignoring ads in almost a subconscious manner. Native advertising is a method of advertising that seeks to provide content in the context of a users experience, taking advantage of a media platform in the ways that consumers are actually using it. The goal is to make advertising less intrusive, increasing the likelihood that consumers pay attention or click on an ad.[1]  Recently, one of the most well known names in bathroom tissue, Charmin, has started using native advertising for the launch of their new promotional musical campaign based on the companies tagline “We all go, why not enjoy the go?”

 

The campaign features 30 second bathroom themed ballads, which Ripp identifies as “so well crafted, catchy, and authentically pop that many listeners are unaware that they’re enjoying an advertisement”, let alone a song about the ‘go’. The toilet tunes are taking advantage of available channels such as YouTube and iTunes radio, where a number of consumers listen to their favorite music hits.  The campaign acts to create interest around a highly commoditized product reaching audiences formerly oblivious to brand loyalty for bathroom tissue.

 

Good advertisements must be able to break through the clutter to gain and hold attention by providing content that is interesting, useful, or entertaining.[2] The merging of advertising and entertainment is one strategy, which can be used to create brand messages that are a part of entertainment rather then an interruption.[3] Charmin’s creative combination of informative marketing and musical entertainment is an interesting attempt at advertising which is sure to captivate consumers and convince them to choose Charmin as their “Number 1, when they go Number 2”.

 

[1] Ratcliff, C. 2013. What is Native Advertising and why do you need it? Retrieved from: https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-why-do-you-need-it.

[2] Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Trifts, V., Buchwitz, L. 2012. Marketing: An Introduction, Fourth Canadian Edition. Pearson Education Canada. 4th Canadian edition. PP. 464.

[3] Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Trifts, V., Buchwitz, L. 2012. Marketing: An Introduction, Fourth Canadian Edition. Pearson Education Canada. 4th Canadian edition. PP. 465.

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#GALAXY11: The Beginning - YouTube

Epic movie, I mean commercial, for Samsung. 

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

By Jaeik Bae:

 

Many companies make an investment to sponsor the big sport teams such as Manchester United, Real Madrid, and Chealsea FC, etc. It requires a significant amount of spending to become an official sponsor of these teams; nonetheless, sports team sponsorship is often proven effective as companies can connect their brands with the teams that are globally known and create many positive outcomes such as increased brand awareness and positive advertising effect. Moreover, there is no doubt that sporting events bring people together and create a sense of community for fans of all teams; however, only if they are cheering for the same team, right? Hence, companies must be careful in choosing which team to sponsor. Now, what if I tell you that Samsung is sponsoring “team Earth” to battle against aliens to defend the Earth? So we are all cheering for the same team. Interesting, right?

 

Samsung has recently launched its fantasy-inspired global marketing campaign-Galaxy 11. Samsung introduced a four-minute cinematic-style video, which contains famous soccer players from all around the globe such as Messi (Argentina), Ronaldo(Portugal) and 11 other players from 11 different countries using Samsung’s devices to prepare their battle against aliens. The video is quite entertaining and interesting to watch especially for soccer fans.

 

This campaign will be successful as it created a branded entertainment by creating a dream soccer team that only existed in people’s fantasy. Furthermore, Samsung recognized the importance of the sense of belongings when cheering for the same team and instead of separating people by countries, Samsung united them all under the name of Galaxy. Samsung certainly boosted their brand visibility to soccer fans all around the globe and the campaign will be even more successful as the World Cup nears.  

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Esurance – Watch Our TV Commercials

Esurance – Watch Our TV Commercials | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

Check out the latest Esurance commercials to discover how we're built to save you money on car insurance and why our customers love us.

Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Karl Michaud's insight:

 

“Geico, 15 minutes can save you 15% or more on car insurance” - few would argue that Geico’s campaign is not a huge success.  So what is the competition to do?  What should be their advertising strategy to compete? In Marketing: An Introduction, Gary Armstrong states that “Advertising strategy consists of two major elements: creating advertising messages and selecting advertising media.”  Later, Armstrong states that a major obstacle to effective advertising is the ability to “break through the clutter.” 

 

Esurance’s latest advertising strategy not only “breaks through the clutter,” but also targets Geico’s current and future customer base.  The Esurance web page link is at: http://www.esurance.com/commercials

 

Esurance, like many companies is advertising on TV, the internet, twitter, and has a blog, Further; Esurance has an extensive PR campaign that targets the LBGT community, veterans, and communities in general.  Also, Esurance offers an online tool that predicts whether gas prices will rise or fall.  Despite all these efforts, the most effective part of Esurance’s overall strategy (advertising strategy and PR plan) rests with their advertising message.

 

The Esurance link has a number of TV and internet commercials that depicts different situations with different people but the message remains, “. . . just like her car insurance.  But 15 minutes for a quote isn't how it works anymore. With Esurance, 7.5 minutes could save you on car insurance. . . Meet Larry, HD holdout. He saves time by not rewinding DVDs — which is crazy. Kinda like taking 15 minutes for a quote. With Esurance, 7.5 minutes could save you on car insurance.”

 

In essence, Esurance has high-jacked Geico’s message.  In so doing, Esurance will reach the same customer base as Geico, “breaking through the noise” in a highly effective and efficient manner, which is half the battle.

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Prankvertising: Are Outrageous Marketing Stunts Worth the Risks?

Prankvertising: Are Outrageous Marketing Stunts Worth the Risks? | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

I cannot help but think that the face of advertising has changed in many ways in recent years from free social media marketing to good and bad media stunts. Companies are going to extremes as they vie for our business using a form of advertising known as “prankvertising” via viral videos of pranks designed to draw our attention to a brand or company. 

This article discusses how and whether “prankvertising”  is worth it. “Prankvetising” is achieving its intended use, it is getting us talking and sharing the videos with our friends and family who in turn do the same via social media.  After all we all love a good prank. “Prankvertising” grabs our attention, makes people laugh and cuts through the clutter and complexity of modern media. These trending viral videos are eventually picked up by mainstream media. The article discusses that the ultimate goal of “prankvertising” is getting the video onto traditional mainstream media.  Once a prank advertisement is picked up by traditional media, it allows companies to reach millions of people without the same financial investment required of television commercials and other advertising ploys.  It amuses and leaves consumers with a memorable impression which is forever linked to the brand or company.  “Prankvertising” cuts through the continuous advertising noise that consumers are bombarded with daily.  I am not sure that I will ever forget the devil baby prank or the alien crop circles.  Admit it. You know which pranks I talking about. Is it worth the risk? So far it is, but this begs the following questions: “What will happen when “prankvertising” crosses the line and enrages consumers?  Will it spell the end of a company or brand?”

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Super Bowl Ads Without the Super Bowl

Super Bowl Ads Without the Super Bowl | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
For advertisers, the ability to hype a Super Bowl commercial before the game is as valuable as the airtime itself.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Placing a 30 second ad during Super Bowl will costs companies a little North of 4 million dollars this year again, but many believe that the hype around these ads easily justify this price tag. However, many companies are not content any longer to just have these 30 seconds of exposure, but they announce, tease and sometimes even early release their ad in order to build excitement and ad understanding even before the event:

 

From the article: “Many advertisers think of it now as a monthlong challenge,” Tim Calkins, a professor of marketing at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, told me. “It is not about winning the Super Bowl but winning an entire month.”

 

The benefits of such an approach is that it builds engagement and even elevates the ads to mini-movies through offering behind the scene footage, teaser trailers and advertising campaigns for an advertising campaign: "Bud Light’s preview campaign has been especially extensive. The beer company has released six thirty-second teasers for its Super Bowl ad, both online and on television."

 

It also builds understanging, since a subset of really engaged viewers will have already read about and discussed the content of the ads before the game, making understanding of the ad's message easier, and also facilitating recall. Last, releasing ads early also allows to increase total viewership, of course:

 

From the article: “The surprise factor doesn’t matter as it once did,” Justin Osbourne, the general manager of brand and marketing communications at Volkswagen of America, told me. “Our goals are about how many total views we can get. To assume that that is going to happen within forty-eight hours is cutting yourself pretty short.”

 

While many companies adopt this model of teasing and early release, Chrysler is going against the grain by cherishing the live character of the Super Bowl event. Chrysler gathered a lot of attention through its two minute long ads that celebrate blue collar workers in America, but then again these ads were also 2 minutes long (16 million right there) and therefore stood out due to their length alone.

 

"These felt less like ads than like public-service announcements. That trick was aided by the fact that the ads appeared unexpectedly, without weeks of hype prodding us to get ready to be moved. Their form connected directly to their message: everyone saw them for the first time at the same moment; we were all in it together."

 

It is ironic in a sense that these movie quality, sometimes poetic ads are not teased up front, as their movie potential is one of the greatest among all Super Bowl ads. As interesting as the "in it together, live" idea is, I think there is a lot more opportunity to be found for Chrysler in a teasing campaign without giving away their surprise moment.

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Nvidia crop circle marketing stunt gets attention

Nvidia crop circle marketing stunt gets attention | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
A chip maker's plot to draw attention to a new product had people scratching their heads and looking for UFOs

 

Not sure if this is how I do this, I can get it to post with the insight tag on my own page, but I don't seem to get that option here.

 

This is a strong example of using mystery and the main stream media to do your marketing for you and at little cost. 

 

The level of detail in the crop circle plays on people who believe that “aliens” are out there to drive the story and because of the buzz create by those who are alien visitor believers, main stream media outlets like CNN which cater to people’s desire to believe in the weird and wonderful quickly hopped onboard with the story giving it international attention. http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/01/us/california-crop-circle-gone/

 

It is also an effective campaign due to the many meanings of the number 192 that is written in braille in the crop circle design.  These possible meanings created further interest in the story as many individuals taking a preference as to which of the various meanings of the number were trying to be represented caused further attention in the media.

 

Adding to the buzz was the release of a YouTube video reportedly showing “aliens” creating the crop circle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eoz0QUYU45o

 

When the company Nvidia announced at the Consumer Electronics show that the crop circle was their work and was designed to promote the company’s newest chip for smart phones and tablets, the company was able to use all the publicity that the crop circle speculation and associated You tube video had created to effectively create a buzz about their company and its newest product prior to one of the world’s biggest electronics shows.

 

 http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_24853325/monterey-county-crop-circle-publicity-stunt-nvidia

 

The overall result is that Nvidia was able to be the buzz company at the start of the show and it created the effect at little cost by pandering to those who believe in the improbable and the main stream media’s desire to get the next big scoop!

 

This is my submission for Marketing trend #2

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Genius ideas might come from the past Free wallet from Burger King

Genius ideas might come from the past Free wallet from Burger King | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Randy and I were having lunch in downtown Orlando today when someone appeared to have dropped their wallet. People shouted out to the person who dropped the wallet and Randy ran over and picked it ...
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

Another good example how communications can be a powerful way to reach consumers. It does not have to be TV all the time, and not billboard either. Burger King sent out a horde of people who dropped their wallets at busy places, just to be found by other people to "reward" them with coupons and other collectibles. 

 

This simple guerilla tactic does the trick just nice, creating excitement, surprise, joy and gratitude that can be connected to the brand.

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CocaCola China - Chok! Chok! Chok!

As one of the top 10 brands in the world, Coca-Cola fails to disappoint with their 2012 "Chok" TV ad campaign in Hong Kong. Chok (擢樣) means “to forcefully make oneself look more handsome”. The word presumably has the onomatopoetic connotation of flinging or “chucking” objects, which is the basis of the interactive campaign. The Chok ad campaign accurately analyzed the psychographic and media habits of Hong Kong teenagers and was able to creatively link the Coke TV commercial with a mobile app that lets you score discounts on products and services. Coca-cola's success in this campaign is twofold as it not only effectively culturally appeals to the teenage population in Hong Kong, but it also turned a traditional TV ad into an innovative and interactive TV gaming promotion reaching 380,000 mobile app downloads in one month and 9 million total views for a television commercial. The use and benefit of cross-platform marketing is that it synergies the strengths of different digital marketing mediums to create a strong brand recall value. By meeting consumers at different mediums, there is a higher reach and delivery, better frequency planning and optimization through integrated ad effectiveness. It is evident that with a well thought out media strategy and a selective media schedule, a simple TV ad campaign can become one of Hong Kong's most successful Coke Promotion and TVC in 35 years.

 

(Jessica Louie, Comm335-01, Cross-platform Marketing Integration, Television Advertising, Mobile Application, Interactive Gaming Promotion)

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How to Change Buying Cars Forever

The Dodge Dart Registry is a campaign by Chrysler that proclaimed the bold statement of ‘How to Change Buying Cars Forever’. This new campaign attempts to use crowdfunding in order to help finance a 2013 Dodge Dart, which is a sedan aimed at the younger generation for its cool interior and exterior and lively engine. The commercial explains how the website works and portrays how easy it will be for young people to get a new car by having their relatives and friends each supply a little bit of money in order to fund the entire vehicle. The users of the registry are encouraged to use social media such as Twitter and Facebook to campaign in order to try to procure their funding, which makes it an integrated campaign. This has become a successful campaign due to thousands of users setting up registries for free and many getting very close to fully funding their cars, including some not for profit charities.

            This campaign touches on the course concept of consumer insights by Chrysler analyzing the younger demographic and coming up with this entirely new way to approach them in terms of automobile sales. Their insights were that young people generally need a lot of help from family to purchase new cars and this would be a fresh way to attempt to get money without having to ask their family directly along with being able to see their progress as they go along. Chrysler understands their target audience and this is a clever way of marketing their new car as an attainable goal through their use of social media and their registry.

 

Erik Snucins, 06045350, Comm353-1, consumer insights, understand target audience, campaign

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Karlos's curator insight, March 19, 2013 8:07 PM

So here is a new way of trying to sell something, by kinda not selling it at all, due to the buyer not paying for it. It just goes to show that the person who uses the item is not entirely the one that pays for it. Back to the principles of marketing and enticing your target market.

Mika de Wet's comment, March 21, 2013 1:42 AM
Wow i have never really thought f it but this is a really cool and it could actually work with the right kind of marketing skills.
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Dove: Thought Before Action

Dove: Thought Before Action | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

The latest installment in Dove's Real Beauty campaign is a creative online video called Thought Before Action. It showcases Dove's mission to confront the art directors and graphic designers responsible for  'manipulating our perception of real beauty' through photo re-touching with the message that true beauty is real beauty.  

 

This campaign has been incredibly successful. Dove's promotion of self-confidence and happiness serves as a powerful emotional appeal that deeply connects with women of all ages, shapes, sizes, and colours. The consistency and integration of this message in every element of Dove's Real Beauty campaign - from its billboards to its CSR initiatives - have created very positive  associations with the Dove brand, which ultimately influence consumers in the liking, preference, and conviction stages. When consumers are evaluating alternatives and making purchase decisions, they will remember the brand that told them that they were beautiful.

 

Thought Before Action is a creative public relations stunt that has differentiated the brand by strengthening the importance of social influences pertaining to self-image. It is a newsworthy campaign that has stimulated positive media coverage and sparked a conversation among consumers on various media platforms. As Dove continues to blur the lines between public relations, CSR and traditional advertising, it is coming dangerously close to breaking the golden rule of public relations. Upholding its credibility will be critical to maintaining the perception that Dove is promoting a positive message, not selling trying to sell a product.

 

(Natalie Fisher, 06059159, Comm 335-2, public relations, emotional appeal, campaign)

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Samsung Mobile USA - The Next Big Thing

The Superbowl commercials have become as important as the game itself and one of the spots getting the most attention is Samsung’s "Next Big Thing" ad featuring Seth Rogen, Paul Rudd, Bob Odenkirk and LeBron James. The campaign is intended to persuade consumers that the new Samsung Galaxy Smart Phones are the ‘Next Big Thing’, although the products themselves are not heavily promoted but instead come across as mere product placements in the ad. The subtle jokes and cultural references are perfect, and it is easy to tell that this ad is geared toward the smart football and sports fans that enjoy the humour they would find in one of their favorite movies. This thus helps create an emotional appeal, which will help increase liking and preference for the brand and eventually, behaviour in buying Samsung’s products.

 

Jean Chia, 10081459, Comm335-002, campaign, emotional appeal, samsung

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