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Marketing in Motion
Marketing practice is rapidly changing. This topic explores the latest trends in marketing communications, digital and mobile marketing, social media, community / tribal marketing and value co-creation.
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Scooped by Joachim Scholz, PhD
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Lingerie Brand Aerie Isn't Retouching Its Models With Photoshop For Its New Ad Campaign

Lingerie Brand Aerie Isn't Retouching Its Models With Photoshop For Its New Ad Campaign | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it
Hooray!
Joachim Scholz, PhD's insight:

In the wake of the Abercrombie & Fitch controversy, American Eagle's Aerie lingerie brand is going down the Dove way of real beauty. In its latest campaign, Aerie does not photoshop its models and instead goes with a "real beauty" theme. A smart move for sure to differentiate itself from its competitors, which are criticized for their overall sexual appeal (A&F) and for promoting unrealistic body types (Victoria Secret).

 

Aerie hopes that this new move will not only earn them goodwill from customers, but that their customers reward them with word-of-mouth as well. In order to facilitate engagement, Aerie suggests a hastag to use on instragram and twitter to be featured on their main page. Pretty standard engagement strategy, and I think the real question will lie in whether their target audience will find this move genuine, or whether the dominant writing that "The girl in this photo has not been retouched", which is found on almost every ad, is seen as a sign that this is just a marketing ploy. It will be interesting to see whether this is part of a long-term strategic positioning of aeri, which would certainly make sense.

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Suggested by Brittany Cooper
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Dove: Thought Before Action

Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty was launched almost ten years ago and they continue to introduce movements aimed at promoting natural beauty and making women feel comfortable with themselves. Dove’s newest campaign is targeted directly at those who distort our image of real beauty including graphic designers and photo retouchers. Dove disguised their message as a Photoshop action which claims to add a skin glow enhancement to photos. However, when downloaded the application actually reverts the photo back to its original state, “Making the point that Real Beauty isn’t retouched”.  This campaign presents an example of digital marketing that allows Dove to target a very specific audience, solely those who partake in the behaviour of photo editing. The campaign doesn’t appear like advertising because it is targeted towards photo-editors rather than Dove’s customers. However, this public relations move appeals to customers because they can connect to Dove’s message as it evokes feelings of acceptance and suggests that Dove believes every woman is beautiful. It’s also an example of conscientious consumerism as it affects positive change, criticizing the photo editing trend which has become commonplace in today’s society. These photos create unrealistic expectations for real girls and women, with potentially damaging effects on their body-image and self-confidence. This creates goodwill for Dove, as celebrating natural beauty improves the firm’s image. 
(Brittany Cooper, 0604 7256, Comm335-1, campaign, digital marketing, public relations, real beauty)

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Suggested by Natalie Fisher
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Dove: Thought Before Action

Dove: Thought Before Action | Marketing in Motion | Scoop.it

The latest installment in Dove's Real Beauty campaign is a creative online video called Thought Before Action. It showcases Dove's mission to confront the art directors and graphic designers responsible for  'manipulating our perception of real beauty' through photo re-touching with the message that true beauty is real beauty.  

 

This campaign has been incredibly successful. Dove's promotion of self-confidence and happiness serves as a powerful emotional appeal that deeply connects with women of all ages, shapes, sizes, and colours. The consistency and integration of this message in every element of Dove's Real Beauty campaign - from its billboards to its CSR initiatives - have created very positive  associations with the Dove brand, which ultimately influence consumers in the liking, preference, and conviction stages. When consumers are evaluating alternatives and making purchase decisions, they will remember the brand that told them that they were beautiful.

 

Thought Before Action is a creative public relations stunt that has differentiated the brand by strengthening the importance of social influences pertaining to self-image. It is a newsworthy campaign that has stimulated positive media coverage and sparked a conversation among consumers on various media platforms. As Dove continues to blur the lines between public relations, CSR and traditional advertising, it is coming dangerously close to breaking the golden rule of public relations. Upholding its credibility will be critical to maintaining the perception that Dove is promoting a positive message, not selling trying to sell a product.

 

(Natalie Fisher, 06059159, Comm 335-2, public relations, emotional appeal, campaign)

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