Marketing Ethics
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Rescooped by Jennifer Kwon from Marketing Ethics
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Facial recognition: inevitable, but will shoppers approve? - Telegraph

Facial recognition: inevitable, but will shoppers approve? - Telegraph | Marketing Ethics | Scoop.it
Tesco will use face recognition in its petrol stations - while some consumers are outraged, others think it will be beneficial.
Jennifer Kwon's insight:

In this article, it introduces Tesco's idea to implement their new facial detection program., OptimEyes. While consumers are waiting at Tesco petrol stations, OptimEyes estimates their age and gender, and tailors ads towards their demographic. Ethical issues that arise with this new program is that consumers are not agreeing to have their information scanned. However, the facial detection program only estimates age and gender and does not store information for the future. An interesting fact is that consumers have contradictory opinions towards OptimEyes, when it is less invasive than other everyday programs being used such as Facebook, Gmail and Loyalty programs. Another surprising detail is that although consumers may see this program as an infringement on their privacy, it is only a way to advertise in a beneficial way to consumers. If a consumer is going to be marketed towards anyways, it is better to have an ad tailored towards their need. With that being said, OptimEyes is unethical as it is not storing images of consumers or using information obtained for anything other than to effectively target consumers with specific advertisements. public opinion ultimately decides what is acceptable as consumers are the ones going to the stores and buying products. If citizens continue to be uncomfortable with this technology, voice their opinion, and reject retailors that use it, marketers will have no choice but to listen to them. The goal of the technology is to create a competitive advantage through tailored ads, but societies approval of the techniques used is needed to be successful and maintain a competitive advantage.   

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Scooped by Jennifer Kwon
Scoop.it!

Facial recognition: inevitable, but will shoppers approve? - Telegraph

Facial recognition: inevitable, but will shoppers approve? - Telegraph | Marketing Ethics | Scoop.it
Tesco will use face recognition in its petrol stations - while some consumers are outraged, others think it will be beneficial.
more...
Jennifer Kwon's curator insight, November 15, 2013 3:12 PM

In this article, it introduces Tesco's idea to implement their new facial detection program., OptimEyes. While consumers are waiting at Tesco petrol stations, OptimEyes estimates their age and gender, and tailors ads towards their demographic. Ethical issues that arise with this new program is that consumers are not agreeing to have their information scanned. However, the facial detection program only estimates age and gender and does not store information for the future. An interesting fact is that consumers have contradictory opinions towards OptimEyes, when it is less invasive than other everyday programs being used such as Facebook, Gmail and Loyalty programs. Another surprising detail is that although consumers may see this program as an infringement on their privacy, it is only a way to advertise in a beneficial way to consumers. If a consumer is going to be marketed towards anyways, it is better to have an ad tailored towards their need. With that being said, OptimEyes is unethical as it is not storing images of consumers or using information obtained for anything other than to effectively target consumers with specific advertisements. public opinion ultimately decides what is acceptable as consumers are the ones going to the stores and buying products. If citizens continue to be uncomfortable with this technology, voice their opinion, and reject retailors that use it, marketers will have no choice but to listen to them. The goal of the technology is to create a competitive advantage through tailored ads, but societies approval of the techniques used is needed to be successful and maintain a competitive advantage.