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Rescooped by Kymberley Pelky from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Maker Knowledge | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


Via Gust MEES
Kymberley Pelky's insight:

I love this graphic! It sums up so much.

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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, February 23, 11:27 AM

Molto interessante!!

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

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Rescooped by Kymberley Pelky from Best Education Infographics
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Why Half-Brain Teaching Isn't Enough Infographic

Why Half-Brain Teaching Isn't Enough Infographic | Maker Knowledge | Scoop.it
Half-Brain Teaching Isn’t Enough Infographic In today’s societies there is a lot of focus on the logical and analytical brain functions. Many schools are cutting the ‘extras’ like art and music. However, students need to be well rounded and really need subjects like those to be con... http://elearninginfographics.com/half-brain-teaching-isnt-enough-infographic/
Via elearninginfographic
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W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, September 10, 9:27 PM

Love the A in STEAM.  This is what I believe #SteveJobs was talking about when he describes Apple as being at the intersection of #LiberalArts and #Technology.    I also love these #Infographics and their ability to feed my visual learning.

Reina Cruz's curator insight, September 11, 10:06 AM

Still need to read

Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, September 13, 3:31 PM

Basically I really like the graphic here. It's leaps out and grabs your attention. The design is appealing yet simple and easy to navigate. Are we teaching these aspects as we engage students in using technology? Design is so utterly important. 

Rescooped by Kymberley Pelky from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Maker Knowledge | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


Via Gust MEES
Kymberley Pelky's insight:

I love this graphic! It sums up so much.

more...
Marco Pozzi's curator insight, February 23, 11:27 AM

Molto interessante!!

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

Rescooped by Kymberley Pelky from iPads in Education
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How to Combine Tellagami Clips in iMovie - iPad Apps for School

How to Combine Tellagami Clips in iMovie - iPad Apps for School | Maker Knowledge | Scoop.it

"Tellagami is a great app for creating short digital stories on an iPad or on an Android device. The shortcoming of the app is that you can only record one scene before you have to save the movie to your iPad. Today, I facilitated a workshop in which we created a bunch of Tellagami stories. Many people in the workshop wanted to combine their Tellagami clips to create a longer video. The easiest way to do that on an iPad is to use iMovie. In the video below I demonstrate how you can combine Tellagami video clips in iMovie."


Via John Evans
Kymberley Pelky's insight:

Digital maker knowledge for library programming fun!

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