Marketing and PR
Follow
Find
23 views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
onto Marketing and PR
Scoop.it!

4 Marketing Strategy Tips For Your Company on Twitter. Fantastic article for anyone using a business Twitter! #SKB419

4 Marketing Strategy Tips For Your Company on Twitter. Fantastic article for anyone using a business Twitter! #SKB419 | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
RT @ActivaSolutions: 4 Marketing Strategy Tips For Your Company on Twitter http://t.co/WkOonk95mJ Very Helpful.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:
I think this is a great article! Not only is it good for businesses who just decided to jump on the Twitter train, but also for those who have been using Twitter for a while and need a refresher on how to use their feed well. I think my company uses Twitter successfully and is able to engage customers, but there is always room for improvement!

The article gives four strategies for company Twitter use: follow the experts, target people with keywords, tweet regularly and know who you're tweeting to. From my experience, my company is great at all of those, but where we could potentially improve the most is using keywords regularly. We do our best to post fun things so our page is light-hearted and a joy to read, but we could always add keywords to help bring more people to our page. Along with that, retweeting more experts would also improve our page. I will definitely be keeping this article in mind while tweeting from now on!
more...
Jose Gonzalez's curator insight, January 29, 1:19 AM

Amazing !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

From around the web

Marketing and PR
I am a public relations student with a marketing minor at SIUE. I feel it is very important to know not only marketing, but how it fits into the PR world. I have picked to curate stories about marketing and PR with the hopes that I can learn about the marketing applications within the real world of public relations.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sarah Bivens-PR from Sassy Social Media Marketing
Scoop.it!

Pinterest vs Instagram – Which is best for E-Commerce Marketing?

Pinterest vs Instagram – Which is best for E-Commerce Marketing? | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Visual social platforms Pinterest and Instagram are on fire currently, but which is best for E-Commerce Marketing? Premier Lampshades investigates. (Pinterest vs. Instagram. Which do you prefer for e-Commerce?

Via Ellen Noh
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Pinterest Marketing Basics - Pinterest 101 - Its The Cleaning Lady

Pinterest Marketing Basics - Pinterest 101 - Its The Cleaning Lady | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
For information about Banks & Financial Institution Cleaning Services in geo1, call us today!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

An Underwear Company Pulls Stunt In North Korea That Is Anything But Good

An Underwear Company Pulls Stunt In North Korea That Is Anything But Good | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it

An underwear company's stunt in North Korea shows utter disregard for cultural competence. 

Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

This article shows the major differences in cultural communications. A Swedish underwear company, Björn Borg, devised a plan to bring love, in the form of pink panties, to the country that most needs it. Countries were asked to vote on which country they thought needed love and, helped by South Korea, North Korea won this title. An undercover journalist was hired to drop 450 panties off her balcony. The stunt was not well received.

 

I think that from a publicity standpoint, this was a well thought-out stunt. I had never heard of this underwear company before reading this article, but now I have. I also think the “who needs the most love” concept is a good concept. It would be interesting, and most likely funny, to try between cities or states here in the United States. I think our culture would embrace this competitive spirit and most would not be offended. However, the same cannot be said for those in North Korea.

 

Though it got their name out into the media, I think this was poorly planned out in respect to cultural differences. Guth & Marsh state, “Cross-cultural communication lapses also can have tragic consequences… communications across cultures can be like tiptoeing through a minefield.” (p. 216). The article talks about how conservative the North Korean culture is. I think this shows utter ignorance of the public relations team and marketing team working for Björn Borg.

 

After taking an intercultural class last year, it really frustrates me to see such blatant disregard for other cultures. I know next to nothing about the North Korean culture, but I now enough to know that this kind of stunt would be incredibly inappropriate. The same book states, “As noted earlier, the study of different cultures is a fascinating, never-ending process, “ (p. 221). As public relations and marketing professionals we need to be constantly learning about our field, and about the people in our field as well. Especially with the amount of online communication there is now, we need to be constantly aware of if we are saying and how it will be accepted by different cultures.

 

I also think the marketing director’s response to backlash of the issue was absolutely terrible. Even as a public relations student I could have formulated a much better response than that. Stating that the company knew it was going to be difficult to succeed but was proud of their attempt to spread “underwear-love” in such a community. Had the company done any research whatsoever they would have realized how terrible of an idea this truly was. Though they may have gained publicity, I do not think it is good publicity that will improve their company in any way. If anything, it will hurt their reputation. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Is Press Release Marketing Dead Or Alive?

Is Press Release Marketing Dead Or Alive? | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Is press release marketing even worth pursuing? Here are both sides to the story.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

This article was about whether press release marketing is still a good use of time and money. I like the fact that the article gave credit to both sides of this argument, good and bad. The side against the need for press releases basically just stated how they are useless for backlinks and not a productive use of time for SEOs.

 

The positive side of this article said that the elimination of backlink usage simply enhances the value of a press release. The reason the Internet improvements are so detrimental to SEOs are because they have, essentially, cut the crap. Google has done all they can to make the most relevant stories come up as top rankings, not just the stories with proper verbage and tabs. They conclude that press releases are still valuable tools; they need to transition into a part of marketing, however, not the whole plan.

 

Personally, I think this article is very interesting. I am coming into the public relations field in a time that is very transitional. I have heard that all the writings in class I am being taught, press releases, news releases, etc. are going by the wayside or becoming digital. I am against strictly digital PR so I agree with the positive side of this article. I think that print copies of PR materials will always be necessary and important.

 

Guth & Marsh state, “As consumer publics change, no doubt marketing public relations tactics will change as well. New practitioners should understand traditional consumer relations tactics- but they also must be ready to meet evolution and innovation,” (p. 170). I think consumer relations fits very well with this article because it really all does stem from what the consumer likes and what they want. You can have the “perfect marketing plan” with a great press release, but if you aren’t using it properly, it will do nothing for you company.

 

I found it interesting that the article stated that PR should be just one aspect of a marketing plan while on page 169 our book it clearly states that, “an enduring misperception among some communication professionals is the belief that public relations is merely a subset of marketing.” I think there needs to stop being a separation of duties between the two.

 

Overall, I think this was a great article, especially for my generation. We need to be aware of these technological changes and know how to utilize all of our resources effectively. This includes a traditional press release, as well as a press release within a marketing plan. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Cross-agency collaboration can help marketing

Cross-agency collaboration can help marketing | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Quite a few agencies are becoming more specialized in what they do, but your brand still has the same needs. Make it easy for the agencies you hire to work well together.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

This article talked about how cross-agency collaboration can really help business learn and thrive. They go through the process of picking the proper company to collaborate with and some great key points on the process as a whole.

 

I think collaboration is key to marketing a successful business. Not only should marketers be collaborating with those in their office but also those in other offices and their publics. Marketing is constantly evolving with the new addition of social media platforms, new technological advances and more. Working together will help marketers learn how to use new mediums and open up new doors that individual marketers may not find on their own.

 

Of the five key points for cross-agency collaboration, I think communicating needs, establishing a process and setting-up team tools are the most important. These are the cores of having good communication between businesses. I think this article goes right along with our lesson on business-to-business communication.

 

Guth & Marsh state, “B2B relations may well be one of the most important elements in the future of public relations. As long as B2B practitioners seek shared values and mutually beneficial relationships, they will feel at home,” (p. 196). I think this is especially true for any business that deals with consumers as well as other businesses. Creating a lasting relationship with another business is good for everyone. Bouncing ideas and information off each other will benefit all.

 

At my internship we utilize B2B communication. When I was given the responsibility of running their social media pages, I was nervous about finding a post for every day about eyes, as I work for a vision center. We utilize the feature on Facebook that allows us to follow other pages and I can get ideas of posts from them. I know other stores use it as well because I have seen some of their posts on their pages.

 

This demonstrates that we are learning as we go and learning together. “Digital marketing isn’t… mature yet,” says the vice president of marketing at Responsys Kathy Gogan, “It’s going to take some patience and some more learning,” (p. 194). I think my company could really benefit from using cross-agency collaboration. We only follow other eye companies, but if we were to plan with another one of those businesses we could potentially do even better than we currently are.

 

As the article states, marketers have such huge to-do lists these days, I think working together could seriously cut the time and costs of research. Having two different forces working together creates more opportunities to test mediums and ideas. It these to-do lists become more focused and productive, companies can stay on the cutting edge. I truly believe this could do just what the article says, “not create more work for you; rather, it should result in superior, cost-effective results.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

The Top 7 Online Marketing Trends That Will Dominate 2014

The Top 7 Online Marketing Trends That Will Dominate 2014 | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
This amazing article will prepared you for the future trends about online marketing. Click Here The Internet has drastically altered the way in which information is shared, and has had a profound i...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Social Media Marketing: How To

Social Media Marketing: How To | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it

If you ever want to be successful at online brand marketing, this is a must-read article. Proper utilization is key. 

Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

I think this article is absolutely fantastic for anyone who will be doing any kind of social media marketing at any point throughout their career. It has been hard for me to adjust to the marketing side of social media, Twitter especially. I use my Twitter for personal thoughts and opinions, so switching to the marketing mentality for a company has been a process.

 

The author has compiled a list for tweeting compelling and creative things. Instead of just writing a long article on his discoveries, I think it is very effective that he has gathered screenshots and examples to demonstrate each one of his points.

 

I love that this article puts the focus on knowing what and what not to do on Twitter. I think marketers downplay how great of a tool Twitter can be because they simply don’t know how to use it properly. Retweeting something that makes your company look bad is not a good idea and replying to someone without tagging their name makes you look clueless. Our book states, “The interactivity of the Web can be an effective tool for building and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships- if it is used properly,” (Guth & Marsh, p. 320). Knowing the ins and outs of Twitter will help a company engage in their current customers and gain new ones.

 

I found the author’s second point about not doing product-based competitions, like a jigsaw puzzle, to be an interesting one. Though I know a jigsaw puzzle might not necessarily be the best option, my company encourages me to create interactive posts because they have had the most positive feedback from them in the past. It shows how incredibly important picking and choosing your content to cater to the needs of your customers truly is.

 

As the article progresses I think the author makes a lot of great points. Use Vine. Catch celebrities. Offer discounts. Curate. Being able to utilize every aspect Twitter has to off and the ability to link it to other information, as well as other social media accounts, could be extremely useful.

 

I think one of the biggest struggles of having so many social media accounts these days is keeping up-to-date on each one of them. The book says, “The Internet and its many uses are constantly evolving,” (Guth & Marsh, p. 321). Staying current on your posts is not the only important aspect of social media; staying current on what new social media is popular, what new aspects to the social media you already use are popular, news, trends and more is a large part of maintaining a successful online brand. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Personal branding: 5 components to help you land a job

Personal branding: 5 components to help you land a job | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Use the same branding techniques as major companies standout in today’s crowded job market.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

How your online reputation affects the bottom line

How your online reputation affects the bottom line | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
In the next five years, 83 percent of companies will face a crisis that will negatively affect their share price. Here's how to ensure that won't be you.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

BuzzFeed: future of content marketing?

BuzzFeed: future of content marketing? | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
The site’s president says the “social content marketing” BuzzFeed does is the “type of stuff David Ogilvy did.”
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

I’m an addict. The first step is admitting it, right? I was never into the news when I was younger, and I still do not pay attention as much as I should. To me, it was always depressing topics: war, fights, murder, burglary and more. I viewed it not as if I do not see it, it is not there, but more as if I do not see it, I do not have to deal with it. Recently, I have discovered a whole new way to view the news: Buzzfeed. It is safe to say I am obsessed.

 

I think this article is incredibly interesting, and opened up a side of Buzzfeed I had not considered. Throughout the article, you learn how parts of Buzzfeed are social content marketing. Their goal is to get content into the viral community from the brands that work with them. Throughout the article CEO, Jonah Peretti talks on this and of how there is a fine line between too much and not enough brand marketing. The end article needs to have the perfect ratio.

 

As an avid reader, I was oblivious to the marketing side of this site. I always get on it in the morning and the evening to catch up on the new articles and for a good laugh. Should I have picked up on the marketing? Of course. However, the articles I choose are mostly lighthearted and entertaining so they never struck as marketing a brand to me. This is what I feel makes this site so spectacular.

 

The Buzzfeed staff is able to market their message to the public without it feeling like your regular advertisement or an in-your-face campaign. They are able to get the necessary point across, get the brands message across and entertain the readers. Buzzfeed for the win. The point I found most interesting throughout this article was the very last sentence, “The content finds its audience.” There have been many articles that I have found worthy of reposting and have seen my reposts reposted onto some of my friends’ pages. This spiral effect makes the marketing extremely successful because it allows the content to trickle through the Internet to audiences who will be very interested in the content.

 

From a public relations standpoint, Buzzfeed is a great medium to use for a positive light. If my client had a crisis, say from being Lindsay Lohan, Buzzfeed would be the perfect site to place an article. Said article could be written lightly, maybe poking fun at some of the rough situations, but also tying in the fact that she is bettering herself. Then readers will have a smile on their face when it comes to Lohan. They will remember a positive article with credible information about her rehabilitation. My "Adventures In PR" book states that, “…some websites have served as responsible forces for social changes… (Guth & Marsh p. 325)". Buzzfeed is one of these sites. They have not only changed views on specific brands and topics, they have transformed social content marketing entirely.

more...
Sarah VanSlette's comment, September 14, 2013 4:52 PM
I, too, am an addict. Is there Buzzfeed Anonymous? :)
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Custom Content Is the Future of Marketing [Infographic]

Custom Content Is the Future of Marketing [Infographic] | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Keep updated with latest cool infographics in B2B marketing and technology services/products by subscribing to our RSS feed: More Cool Infographics>> (Custom Content Is the Future of Marketing [Infographic] http://t.co/nNsqgAwtjV)...
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

I love the fact that this article isn't actually an article at all. The point of it is to show people that they need to be creative. The same ol' same ol' isn't going to continue to work for very long. Technology is improving and increasing, as are people's expectations. When I go onto multiple websites and they have the same pictures or ads, I take a second to figure out who stole from the other and then lose respect for the guilty party. 

 

Instead of writing an article about how to be creative, the author put together a picture. It worked because out of the 100 suggestions I have on the side of the screen, this is the article that caught my attention and this is the article I spent my time reading and learning from. If we want to be successful marketers and PR people, creative thinking is our biggest strength. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

12 Social Media & Marketing Techniques to Avoid | #SeriouslySocial

12 Social Media & Marketing Techniques to Avoid | #SeriouslySocial | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
(UPDATED– More techniques added!) It’s no secret, just like you, just like everyone, I’m busy.  I’m always on the look out for something that is going to make me more productive and faster at I’m working on.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

It is great to know what to do on Twitter, but this article lets you know that it is also great to know what not to do on Twitter. I would love to print this out and hand it to many different companies, especially those who have five different accounts linked and post the same to everything. I cannot stand seeing the same post twice on one page. Quite frankly it just looks sloppy and like the company is trying to take the easy way out.

 

This article has twelve great tips on what to do, but also, more importantly, what to avoid doing while on social media. What stuck out most to me was number nine: PLAN. If you do not have a plan and are just randomly tweeting, chances are your company is going to look ridiculous. You should have topics and target audiences in mind. Leave the random tweeting to the public on their personal accounts. Number four also stuck out to me: Over Post or Under Post. I respect compants that take the timeto post multiple times a day, but not multiple times an hour! 

 

This is a great article for anyone who wants to use Twitter in a serious, engaging and proper way! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

The 3 Core Elements of Good Storytelling (And Why Your Business Needs Them)

The 3 Core Elements of Good Storytelling (And Why Your Business Needs Them) | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Think of a story, any story. How about Cinderella, for instance. If you remember it, what does that story bring up right away in your mind? If we exa (New!
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

The author talks about how a great writer puts three parts into everything he or she writes: sequence, suspense and a rollercoaster. He made the point of saying that he understands each story isn't necessarily a "story," but that writing it as so makes said item unique and memorable. He talks about how too many articles are "how-to or reporter-like." I definitely agree with this. I get tired of reading the news because I feel like every story is written the same with just different character and plot line. If each reporter would pretend they were telling a story, I could see the everyday news becoming much more interesting. 

 

I think this is a great article for all who plan to write anything, for anyone, in the future. It brings a whole new view on how to write, and not just write stories, but rather how to write everything in a way to grab attention; this will definitely help me to not only get my point across, but do it in a way that is interesting and will stick in the reader's mind. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Gap Takes Time To Respond To Defaced Ads

Gap Takes Time To Respond To Defaced Ads | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it

When an picture was tweeted with a defaced Gap ad, the company quickly resonded and fixed the problem. 

Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

This article focuses on Gap, the clothing store. It had come to their attention via Twitter that some of their ads out in public places had been defaced. Their ads featured a Muslim man and the saying “Make Love.” People wrote rude, racist comments on the add changing the saying to “Make Bombs.” When the company found out about the defacing, they responded and resolved the issue very quickly. Not only did they respond and thank those who let them know within the same day, but they also took action and replaced all defaced ads.

 

Personally, this impressed me. Working in a partly customer service focused job, I know how difficult it is to respond to customers, especially in such a timely manner. This also shows how important social media is to a company. Though social media is a fantastic marketing, public relations, customer service, etc. tool, it is also a wonderful crisis management platform. Having someone stay on top of tweets to the company can prevent bad situations, or help to fix them just as it did for Gap. Guth & Marsh state, “When a consumer contacts a company, whether via phone, U.S. mail, e-mail, or instant messaging… the company must respond as quickly as possible,” (p. 170).

 

Center et al lists the number one guideline to help organizations handle as crisis as, “Anticipate the unexpected. There are few events that cannot be anticipated.” In this situation, I think Gap did this well. Unfortunately, putting a picture of a Muslim man onto an ad will most likely cause some controversy (no matter how wrong that is). I think Gap already anticipated backlash of some sort and was fully prepared to fix any problems. I think it was a fantastic move to completely replace the defaced posters and to change their Twitter header to the real ad to show their customers how important it was to them.

 

Overall, I think Gap handled this situation with flying colors. They were worried about their customers as well as the overall perception of their brand. By staying up on their social media, they were able to deal with the problem much quicker that many other companies would. They publicly showed how much they truly care about the well being of their customers and non-customers alike. I rarely shop at Gap, but after seeing this I will most likely be stopping by their store the next time I visit the mall.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Twitter Campaign Play Important Role In Race Relations

Twitter Campaign Play Important Role In Race Relations | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it

The hashtag "#BBUM" becomes a vital tool for students and the University of Michigan staff to discuss racial relations within the campus community.

Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

This article focuses on a Twitter Campaign formed by a group of University of Michigan students. The hashtag, #BBUM, was created as an outlet for students to discuss racial interactions at the college. The hashtag stands for “Being black at the University of Michigan.” The hashtag ended up being used over 13,000 times within just 24 hours and was on the radar of the University of Michigan Twitter page. The students said they wanted a way for their voices to be heard, and the university’s Twitter page made sure they knew they had made a statement.

 

I think it is incredibly important for public relations people to remember how vital something as a simple hashtag can be, whether it is being used for good or for bad. We need to be aware of what hashtags are floating around that have to do with our company. If there is something overwhelmingly negative, we need to figure out a way to fix the problem. On the other hand, if something is very positive, we should find a way to highlight that to our publics.

 

Twitter can ultimately be a free advertising tool if we are able to use it to our advantage. Guth & Marsh state, “As “social networking” or “buzz marketing” continues to grown, the reputation of a company and its brands will play an even greater role in the word-of-mouth communication around products and services,” (p. 134). Had the school ignored this important hashtag, it could have potentially hurt their image. By acknowledging this as an issue that needed attending to, they showed compassion and concern for the well being of their students. This hashtag opened up a way for them to keep tabs on the happenings within their community, as well as show that they are aware and able to respond to significant issues.

 

Consumer relations, as a marketing and PR person, is incredible important. Whether you work for a business or a firm, timely and relevant communication is the key to keeping your publics happy. The same book states, “ When a consumer contacts a company, whether via phone, U.S. mail, e-mail, or instant messaging…the company must respond as quickly as possible,” (p. 170). Responding quickly to hashtags, good and bad, will help you build trust and relationships with your publics. People like to know that their voice is being heard, so acknowledging their importance to you, or your company, will create a positive image.

 

As social media continues to evolve and grow, it is our responsibility to stay current and be constantly checking mediums, like Twitter. This way we do not miss something greatly important like “#BBUM.” I think this is the only way to be truly successful in our field. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Microsoft's "Pathetic" Anti-Google Campaign

Microsoft's "Pathetic" Anti-Google Campaign | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it

Microsoft reaches a whole new low with their new "Scroogled" product line featuring hats, shirts and mugs with sayings like, "Keep calm while we steal your data."

Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

This article discusses Microsoft’s newest moneymaking ploy. Their anit-Google campaign comes equipped with Scroogled products galore from hats to shirts to coffee mugs. These are complete with sayings like, “Keep calm while we steal your data.” The author pulled a few responses from the public via social media. This stunt was not well received by computer publics and was labeled as “pathetic.”

 

Personally, I agree with the statement that this campaign is pathetic. From the consumer standpoint, I despise when companies take time and spend money to bash other companies. I feel like they should be working to better themselves and spending that money on putting them ahead. If they did this, they could make their product genuinely better and get good publicity from their publics for free.

 

Guth & Marsh state, “Communication with consumers began moving from a product or service focus to information about how the organization operates and what values guide its decision,” (p. 134). Microsoft does not show much moral value with this campaign. Consumers have a plethora of mediums now to learn about a company before ever even venturing to their website. If I see something bad about a company on say, Twitter, I will most likely believe it, especially if it’s from one of my friends. The fact that customers base so much off of an organization’s morality will most likely hurt Microsoft in the long run.

 

Center et al say, “…the changing conditions of the marketplace also brought forth several new [PR] activities, such as: concentrating the publicity and promotion activities on taking customers away from competitors…” (p. 135). My guess is that this was Microsoft’s focus when beginning this campaign. I think they wanted to plant the seed of doubt about Google in people’s minds and they thought merchandise bashing the company was their best plan of action. They may someday be successful at pulling customers away from other competitors, but I think to do that they will have to focus on their product, not the tearing down of another company.

 

I think consumer relations comes into play a lot with this campaign. There has already been a lot of backlash and I am interested to see how Microsoft responds to it, and if they actually do. After seeing these products I lost a lot of respect for the Microsoft brand and would definitely think twice before buying another Microsoft product. My question is, if they are so focused on bashing another company, what are they trying to hide about themselves?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

20 captivating marketing statistics that will drive 2014

20 captivating marketing statistics that will drive 2014 | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Custom, branded content and social marketing are only going to get bigger in the year to come, according to predictions from WebDAM.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Web Ink Now: Do you know what Public Relations is?

Web Ink Now: Do you know what Public Relations is? | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Somehow many corporate executives and even some PR professionals have lost sight of what public relations is. I still hear people confuse media relations with public relations. Public Relations: How an organization engages with its publics.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Red Bull's Social Media Marketing | Social Media Today

Red Bull's Social Media Marketing | Social Media Today | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Red Bull's marketing ethos has translated well into social media, perhaps even helping to shape big brand social media marketing across industries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Gander Mountain Apparently Not Providing 'fat' Children Ponchos Anymore

Gander Mountain Apparently Not Providing 'fat' Children Ponchos Anymore | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it

Gander Mountain has labeled one of their ponchos, "one size fits most youth, unless they're fat." Mistake or ignorance?

Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

Not only am I appalled that this event even occurred, but also at the response to it. To me ‘one size fits most’ is an understood label in the United States. If there is a chance that said clothing item would not actually fit all, then come up with a better label to better suit the needs of your product. I think it was an absolutely terrible move for Gander Mountain to add the tagline, “unless you’re fat.” Who needs to say that? No one with their customers in mind, that’s for sure.

 

I think it was a marketing fail for Gander to add the last three words to their product tag. I understand covering all the bases so they don’t falsify their advertising, but I do not think this added description was necessary. If they had thought about it AT ALL they would have decided that it would be offensive to many people and deter customers from buying their product. Regardless of whether or not I was a larger person, seeing something like that as a label would automatically make me turn away from not only that product, but most likely that business as well.

 

I think it was a bad public relations and marketing move for Gander Mountain to not change the description of their poncho, but rather just take it down from their website completely. I also think an apology that included an explanation would have been a smart tactic to use to better their image. When the media relations department was asked about this, allegedly they said that they would look into it, but that it was definitely not a company policy to state that. I haven’t been able to find any further statements from them.

 

Our book states that, “Crises often happen within full view of important stakeholders, such as the media, regulators, consumers, investors and employees. The crises response has a tremendous influence of their perceptions or the organization or individual in crises,” (Guth & Marsh p. 296). Though I understand this is not necessarily a crisis, it is still means for bad press that will undoubtedly affect the company and all its parts. I was a loyal customer to Gander and have made frequent visits there over the past few years. Now, however, I will think twice before walking through their doors.

 

Since this event was in the near future, I think there is still time for the Gander Mountain public relations team to remedy this misstep. First, I think a formal apology is in order. They need to acknowledge that they may have offended and upset loyal customers without intending to do so. They also need to explain what reasoning, if any, they had for adding that last part to the description. If they were ultimately trying to ‘cover all their basses’ they need to be upfront about this, explain from a business standpoint why it was done and explain that they understand how hurtful it could have been. Without an apology and explanation, I have no doubt that Gander Mountain will lose valuable customers.

more...
Sarah VanSlette's comment, October 28, 2013 12:53 PM
Yes, it IS a crisis--- it is a crisis for Gander Mountain. So it would definitely fall under the Crisis Communication heading.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Maria Sharapova’s name-change stunt was not hit, just miss.

Maria Sharapova’s name-change stunt was not hit, just miss. | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
The tennis star wanted to change her name—temporarily—to ‘Sugarpova’ to promote her line of candies, but it proved to be too much of a headache.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

Personally, I think branding is one of the most important aspects of marketing and public relations alike. Having the proper image can make or break a person or an entire company. Maria Sharapova, a top-notch tennish player has created a positive brand for herself over the years. She has many endorsements, has modeled many times and is the face of several fashion houses.

 

I find it an interesting marketing move to come up with the changing of her last name. She has spent so long creating an image for herself and a personal brand. Our book states, “Desired brand image is the impression that you wish the target market had of your product.,” (Guth & Marsh p. 189). If I were part of her marketing team, I would have stuck with that good, lovable image. I would have wished the public to have a positive view of Sharapova and, in turn, the new product as well.

 

I think the interesting parts of this case stem from the basics. If I were a tennis star, I would not have pegged a candy line as a suitable product to put my name on. I would have picked something like fruit cups or tennis shoes. I think candy contradicts her athletic backing. I would have utilized the fact that she is an athlete to come up with a more marketable product. I also would have utilized the fact that her personal name gets 1.5 million hits on Google a month, while her new candy line only gets 18,000. The changing of her name would cut down her audience by an incredibly large amount.

 

After some further research, I think this was all a terrible public relations move. Yes, it got her name out there and in the news, but not for something admirable. Articles speculate it was an attention ploy; others state that she and her team lied about their reasoning to change her name and then later had to retract those lies because the truth was found out. The way this was all handled is not something to be appreciated. They should have been honest, upfront and had a solid plan that would be carried through. As of now, she looks like a lying cheat who was only trying to make money.

 

I think Sharapova should have decided on her target audience and stuck with that. She should have started a positive campaign involving ideas such as ‘a little candy isn’t so bad alongside some exercise,’ and so on. This would have shown a positive light to her new product, instead of trying to pull a huge public stunt that was an inevitable backfire. She could have used it as a way to advocate concern for children’s health by saying that sweets aren’t bad, if eaten in moderation.

 

Overall, there are many ways that Sharapova could have handled her situation better than she did. It is quite obvious that she did not get the desired impression from her target market since her plan to change her name wasn’t completed. She ended up looking silly, and after hearing that she was willing to change her name for her candy line, I would never consider buying anything in the Sugarpova line. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Small Business Marketing: Why Brand Matters & Two Keys to Building Yours

Small Business Marketing: Why Brand Matters & Two Keys to Building Yours | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Brand matters. People spend their hard-earned dollars where their hearts tell them to. And for small business, building brand is the key to connecting with customers, and that opens the door to getting more customers and keeping the ones you have.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

I can’t imagine being a small town business owner and trying to compete with a huge, franchised business such as McDonalds. If I were looking to start my own business, or improve the one I already have, this would be a fantastic article to refer to. The author says there are two main parts to creating a great brand, and in turn, a great customer base. Know your story and tell it. In her third paragraph she states, “figure out who you are and why you matter to your prospects and customers.” She thinks that if people respect you and your business they are much more likely to put their hard-earned money back into your business.

 

I thought this article to be a great tie to the public relations class I am currently in. We just talked about creating our own personal brand statement for potential employers. I think this could translate right into that topic. This article helped me to realize that when going out into the job market I need to know my story and how to share it. This is a great article for business, but also for everyone wanting to create a name for themselves in the job market! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

Your Business Pinterest - Marketing Association Blog

Your Business Pinterest - Marketing Association Blog | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
Last month when my personal Pinterest account pinged 2 million followers I started thinking more about how this can translate into business success.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:

 A lot of the time I forget that Pinterest can be useful in a business setting. I tend to use it more for entertainment purposes when I am bored or for recipes when I'm starving (and let me tell you that gets me in a load of trouble seeing as to how I repin mostly desserts). Recently, I have discovered that it is a fantastic resource for learning about subjects such as public relations. However, using it from the business side is completely new to me. The company I work for has me pin things regularly, but this article has enriched my thoughts on pinning, hopefully helping me pin more effectively in the future. 

 

This article talks about the best ways to get the name of your business out into your business community in different, engaging ways. The author encourages a business to, "use stunning images, search, name your boards and be descriptive, and cross pollinate." I was simply using Pinterest to repin great posts, but I need to start creating my own so that I can link followers back to my company's site. I need to start using keywords better and engaging in conversations with Pinterest users. 

 

I can no longer look at Pinterest as mere entertainment, it is now a useful tool for me and my company! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah Bivens-PR
Scoop.it!

4 Marketing Strategy Tips For Your Company on Twitter. Fantastic article for anyone using a business Twitter! #SKB419

4 Marketing Strategy Tips For Your Company on Twitter. Fantastic article for anyone using a business Twitter! #SKB419 | Marketing and PR | Scoop.it
RT @ActivaSolutions: 4 Marketing Strategy Tips For Your Company on Twitter http://t.co/WkOonk95mJ Very Helpful.
Sarah Bivens-PR's insight:
I think this is a great article! Not only is it good for businesses who just decided to jump on the Twitter train, but also for those who have been using Twitter for a while and need a refresher on how to use their feed well. I think my company uses Twitter successfully and is able to engage customers, but there is always room for improvement!

The article gives four strategies for company Twitter use: follow the experts, target people with keywords, tweet regularly and know who you're tweeting to. From my experience, my company is great at all of those, but where we could potentially improve the most is using keywords regularly. We do our best to post fun things so our page is light-hearted and a joy to read, but we could always add keywords to help bring more people to our page. Along with that, retweeting more experts would also improve our page. I will definitely be keeping this article in mind while tweeting from now on!
more...
Jose Gonzalez's curator insight, January 29, 1:19 AM

Amazing !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!