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Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | Market to real people | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

 

Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  

 

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...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

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Excerpts:

 

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

 

That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

 

Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

  

• Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

 

• Rethink the structure of your firm.

Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

 

• Harness the power of peers.

....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

 

• Find a problem-swapping partner.

Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

 

• Disasssociate yourself.

Imagine you're doing it for someone else...

 

Full article here


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Better Thinking by Not Thinking: Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge

Better Thinking by Not Thinking:  Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge | Market to real people | Scoop.it

"Where do you do your best thinking? Anywhere but your desk, if you’re like most knowledge workers and leaders. And probably not at work either. Not thinking, but relaxing into your unconscious can produce better thinking."

 

Change colleague Liz Guthridge has a winner of a post on accessing quality thinking by simply not thinking for a spell.  Techniques of mindful meditation, rest (or siesta, as I'd prefer from my Argentine side), as well as just stepping away for a break can contribute to a fresh view and insights from the deep well of our unconscious. ~ DN

 

Excerpts:

 

Individuals tend to get good ideas while driving, exercising, reading, meditating or talking to others.

 

That’s because we automatically tap into our unconsciousness to do most of our thinking. It doesn’t require effort on our part, as David Rock explains. Even better, our unconsciousness—which can seem as vast as the Milky Way—makes powerful connections for us.

  

...Offices are not brain-friendly settings.

  

Her steps to access include:

  

1. Quiet your brain. Start by putting aside all of the electronic gadgets that stimulate you and your brain. You also may want to close your eyes.

  

2. Let your mind wander. (DN:  Mindfulness practices teaches us to observe thoughts, but to NOT engage them.)

  

3. Put yourself in a positive state. 

 

4. Do something else other than work on the issue, problem or dilemma you’re facing. 

  

===

  

Read Liz's post in full here, which includes my commentary on accessing both the Jungian appreciation of the unconcious and using tools, like the MBTI used at the second level of functioning.

 

~  Deb



Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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