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Develop an Audience-Centric Content Strategy

Develop an Audience-Centric Content Strategy | Market to real people | Scoop.it
An audience centric content strategy begins with a well defined persona analysis prior to keyword search as part of your discovery process.

Via digitalassetman, Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Stefano Principato's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:12 AM

Primary objective in this exercise is to define an audience-centric content strategy. Understanding the relationship between themes that are advertorial, industry informational and highly relevant to your targeted audience’s interests will help you stay focused.

Robin Martin's comment, May 15, 2013 10:43 AM
Wow Marty...your own post is perfect! Our shop is professional/organizational learning within the University of Michigan. We have our own website, catalog and very few social media sites. Actually, we have never even used Google keywords/AdWords on our site. I'm thinking this is a definite no-no. Some of us feel it is not necessary since our customers are internal. What is your take on it?
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, May 15, 2013 12:09 PM
Robin, first thanks for all the RT love today you ROCK. Now lets talk PPC. Can PPC play an important role inside of the Uof M? Maybe. If you have specific goals around list creation or have something to sell in a fairly immediate way PPC can provide an important dimension to the rest of the relationship building you do. Not sure how or what content you are monetizing, but I could see a "free UofM" study or white paper that would get my email into your list. Once there you could nurture those on your list with segmented drip campaigns. Clearly tagging those from PPC will give you the ability to judge ROI. Feel free to email your specific use case to me Martin.Smith(at)AtlanticBT.com and I will spend some time thinking about IF or HOW PPC might help. Least I can do for your sharing my content with your great tribe of followers :). Marty
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Storytelling Done Right Can Do The Selling For You

Storytelling Done Right Can Do The Selling For You | Market to real people | Scoop.it
I selected this article from copyblogger because it delivers, it's simple, straightforward and right on the money!

 

Here's an excerpt:

 

"I believe a story can potentially carry the entire sale for your product, even if everything else is technically “wrong” in your ads

 

** no clear call to action

**lame bullets

**weak offer

 

For example:

 

"Nothing in the movie "Top Gun" told you to buy Maverick’s brand of sunglasses or join The US Navy. Yet, the movie “sold” both products to hordes of people.

 

**So, how do you apply this to your marketing?

 

1.  The personal story


This is one of the most common landing page stories.

 

**This one is simple — you just “walk” people (step-by-step) through a painful problem you went through and how you achieved the result your readers are looking for.

 

2. The historical story

 

**This kind of story is extremely persuasive, contains nothing even remotely resembling “hype,” and can persuade people to buy things they otherwise might ignore.

 

3. The “meet the guru” story


**This one is related to the personal story, but it’s got more “pop” due the built-in credibility it gives you.

 

**These suggestions have proven to produce results, he gives more examples......

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Storytelling, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here:  [http://bit.ly/yVmlNV]


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10 Top Execs Share Their Social Media Secrets - Mashable Perspective

10 Top Execs Share Their Social Media Secrets - Mashable Perspective | Market to real people | Scoop.it

When you're occupying the C-suite, you may not have time to think about tweets, Facebook posts, Foursquare check-ins and Pinterest boards. But you should.

 

Great post from leaders in the know, from a respected site, known for being sharp about social media trends:

 

Excerpted:

 

Mashable asked C-suite execs from companies like Virgin, Ford and IBM for their best social media advice and tips: http://on.mash.to/KygBmD ;

 

Think About Community
1. Encourage a Social Culture: Culture and change management is the foundation of true social business transformation – Sandy Carter, vice president, social business evangelism and sales at IBM


2. Stay focused on what is it that’s resonating with the community – Drew Patterson, CEO at Jetsetter


3. Businesses need to dive into these communication channels to enable their customers to communicate about – and with – brands in a true dialogue – Richard Anson, Founder and CEO at Reevoo


4. Social media users can smell unauthenticity in much less than 140 characters. Enjoy yourself, have fun with the conversation, be yourself. "You can’t fake it” – Phil Libin, CEO at Evernote

 

Careful Content
5. Understand the EQ and the IQ of everything you do and especially give a crap of the life time value of your customer and or community – Gary Vaynerchuk, entrepreneur and founder at VaynerMedia


6. Can't be all things to all people, but we should always try to be more things to more people– Alexander Bolen, CEO at Oscar de la Renta


7. Be authentic and organic. It can’t be forced or it won’t work. And most importantly, have fun. – Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group


8. Social Media is a unique space, make sure the people who are most connected, the ones who access it every day, are empowered to be leaders in this environment – Craig Leavitt, CEO at Kate Spade


9. Have the courage to let go and not try to control the conversation or broadcast advertising messages every chance you get. Add value and contribute to the conversation – Geoff Cottrill, chief marketing officer at Converse


10. Let your loyal fans or followers have exclusive access to sales, offers or new lines for a limited time. A great way of rewarding your brands advocates– Mr. Tomoya Ishikawa, Executive Officer and Head of Creative and Web Design Department at Rakuten

 

Read Entire Post here: http://on.mash.to/KygBmD ;


Via maxOz, michel verstrepen, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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maxOz's comment, May 28, 2012 7:45 AM
Alessio, my pleasure hope you had a good weekend xxx
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How Brands Have Become Storytellers - The History of Content Marketing

How Brands Have Become Storytellers - The History of Content Marketing | Market to real people | Scoop.it
We are all publishers today, but that did not used to be the case. Here's an overview of the history of content marketing and how got here.

 

Content marketing and storytelling are becoming a larger part of the marketing organization in general.

 

**Content Marketing Institute and their colleagues are seeing an evolution of the marketing department transform itself into more of a publishing department.

 

Although this is not an easy transition and the pain has just begun, some larger brands have clearly made this transition.

 

**For example, Kelly Services now spends over 60% of their marketing budget on content creation and distribution activities. Even though Kelly’s VP of Thought Leadership Todd Wheatland (and Content Marketing World speaker) states that Kelly has been “doing content marketing for more than 10 years”

 

**many brands are still struggling with content marketing structure. Even though the barriers to entry are gone and we have all the opportunities in the world to develop valuable and compelling content

 

**the biggest corporate challenge is the creation of engaging content.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Storytelling, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/AuNBY]


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Social Media Transparency [Infographic]

Social Media Transparency [Infographic] | Market to real people | Scoop.it

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janlgordon's comment, January 24, 2013 12:35 AM
Thank you Annette Schmeling for your comment, I'm in complete agreement.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 12, 2014 3:48 AM
Social Media Transparency
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Strategy & Customer Relationship (Trust) come first, then Social Media Strategy: Forbes & McKinsey

Strategy & Customer Relationship (Trust) come first, then Social Media Strategy:  Forbes & McKinsey | Market to real people | Scoop.it

"Strategy is more important than ever - so that a company's social media strategy is more than a collection of tactics."

 

From the executive point of view, chief marketing officers and the like comment on 2012 social media strategy at the Chief Marketing & Sales Officer Forum summit  It's good to be reminded of organizational systems.

 

__________________________

 

I’m surprised how often a company’s social media strategy is really just a collection of tactics. - Google’s Margo Georgiadis

__________________________

 

Excerpts by McKinsey contributor, Marc Singer.

 

1. Strategy is more important than ever

From Google’s Margo Georgiadis:  I’m surprised how often a company’s social media strategy is really just a collection of tactics.


The alluring possibilities of social and digital media can easily distract our focus from what really matters to our companies—and to our customers. All of us need to bring in the new while staying focused on our enduring customer strategies.

 

2. To engage customers and influence brand perception, marketers need to build trust

Companies are no longer the sole arbiters of their brand; customers have an important, and in some cases decisive, voice. But marketers still have enormous influence around how customers understand and interact with their brand. ...a lot of that value is dependent on trust between brands and their customers, which has been taking a beating in the last few years. 

 

__________________________

 

Many companies still fail to measure accurately or consistently [as their] metrics programs aren’t tied to strategies built around target customers.

__________________________

 

3. Companies need to “instrument” their organizations around target customer segments

Stanford’s Aakers talked about how leading companies haven’t stopped measuring ROI, but they’ve expanded their notion of what the return might be including a more personal form of ROI better suited for a social age:

innovation,  R&D savings,  employee hiring savings,  employee morale and passion,  and so forth. 

 

Ford’s Farley makes the connection between “brand favorability”—the customer’s overall perception of a brand relative to competing brands—and pricing power. Farley has found that brand favorability is deeply driven by what Ford does in social media.  Many companies still fail to measure accurately or consistently as their metrics programs aren’t tied to strategies built around target customers.

 

Read the full article here.

 

Photo credit:  Flickr CC by John-Morgan


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy

Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy | Market to real people | Scoop.it

What does analysis look like for informal learning? Is it different because it involves technology?  Not really - via Intrepid Learning.

 

It's useful to look at these data gathering steps as a possible checklist for creating the conditions to facilitate informal learning in your organization.  DPPE is a model I like to use:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate.  This fits right into the planning flow.  ~  Deb

 

Excerpted:

 

Analysis for informal learning: Here are a few actions you can take to assess the learner’s needs.

 

Spend time with the learner group in their environment, understand how they go about conducting their work, and look at how they fill learning gaps . Assess where and when they need the support of others because information is not readily available . Conduct interviews, ask questions to gain understanding of their needs .
Craft a user story – a “day in the life of” – and vet that with the learner group . Use focus groups to gain insights including having them walk you through their work processes . Brainstorm with the learner group to identify where they think informal learning might help them accomplish tasks more easily or to provide context  .

Once you gain an understanding of their needs for information, support, and learning within their workflow, you can prepare for the next step in building your informal learning strategy.

 

Read the full article here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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How to Give a Gift of Emotionally Engaging Content

This piece was written by Raf Stevens, author of "No Story No Fans"

 

I selected this because the author gives some very good tips on how to use storytelling that lets your audience know who you are and why they should trust you. People work with and buy from people they like. If you're not connecting with others through your content online, this article will help you.

 

Intro:

 

Many organizations are not even aware that their message has lost all connection with their audience

 

The strange thing with all this is that the solution to creating compelling content is so obvious: Use stories and storytelling

 

Do you think that you or your business is in touch with its own stories? And can they be told in a way that connects them with their audience in this hyper-connected world?

 

Chances are this might not be the case if you have trouble answering any of the following questions:

 

**What story really defines you?

 

**How does your story fit with the heart of your organization?

 

**How is your story emotionally engaging to your audience?

 

**Can your audiences retell your story?

 

**In what ways can they develop trust in your story and act upon it?

 

Here are a couple of good takeaways:

 

Remember the universal truth:

 

Nobody wants to be sold, but everyone wants to be helped. Create content that:

 

**answers your audience's questions

 

**provides them with answers and solutions or demonstrates how your offerings can help them in their everyday lives

 

Build trust

 

Honesty among people is important, but trust is critical for marketers to gain audience support. So make sure your story demonstrates why you arae worthy of your audience's trust.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Storytelling, Social Media & Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/t2Wx1d]


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