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The Top Trust Busters That Dilute Your Credibility

The Top Trust Busters That Dilute Your Credibility | Market to real people | Scoop.it

"You wouldn’t deliberately dilute your own credibility. But it’s possible that some of your innocent behaviors are producing precisely that unintended consequence.

 

Credibility problems can come in the form of trust busters. Let’s consider two of the most common ones, along with their fixes that I call trust builders."

 

Trust Buster #1: Double Talk

Trust Builder #1: Clear the Fog

 

Trust Buster #2: Pulling Rank

Trust Builder #2: Drop the Pretense

 

Read the complete article for insightful details.


Via ThinDifference, David Hain, Bobby Dillard
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
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IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual

IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual | Market to real people | Scoop.it

"To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks."

 

Photo caption:  Preparing for the Google+ Hangout with the UN Secretary-General.

 

Where One Door Closes:  I'm doing a Google+ hangout today to discuss setting up a blogging circle with friends nearby and in another time zone.  I maintain several relationships using Skype, Google+ hangout, Facebook and Pinterest.  

 

The doors are opening to new methods not as bound by silos and other traditional organizational boundaries.  In business, conversational tools and collaborative tools, like PowerNoodle, a collaboration idea sharing tool, are becoming mainstream.

 

_____________________

 

There’s irony in an IBM report of how CEO’s are seeing their businesses changing, based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries...
_____________________

 

It's little wonder that CEO's are seeing the value of screen-time, even thought this well researched IBM study was conducted face-to-face.  The article from Formtek Blog has a title that is not as neutral:  ...Eroding the need for Face-to-Face in Business.   Yet it is hopeful.

 

Some excerpts:

 

There’s irony in the IBM report as the first page — contains only the words: “This study is based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries.”

 

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Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.

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Several major findings:

 

CEO’s are seeing less value in face-to-face encounters and are increasingly pursuing social media and collaboration technologies for interacting with others. . Over 50% [of the CEO's interviewed] expect social channels to be a primary way of engaging customers within five years.”

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20% of CEO’s said that social media already is one of their most important forms of interaction with others

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57% thought that within another 3-5 years social media would become important.

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Currently 80% see face-to-face interactions as very important today, that’s expected to slip to just 67 percent who will feel that way in 3-5 years.

 

 

 

CEO’s are seeing collaboration increasingly as a tool that can be used to bring about team building and cooperation, allowing executives within the organization to work cross-functionally.

 

Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.

 

_____________________

 

CEOs will need to learn from their own networks. They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios.

_____________________

 

Bridget van Kralingen, vice president of IBM Global Business Services, commented, ”Rather than ...de-personalising human relationships, this view leans heavily in favour of deepening them, and using dynamic social networks to harness collective intelligence to unlock new models of collaboration.”

 

Pierre Morin a partner at IBM Global Business Services, said that “...they want people across the organization to feel comfortable reaching out to the CEO to share ideas or engage a discussion. Social media is a mechanism to do that.”

 

The IBM report concludes that

 

“To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks.

 

They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios—with generational, geographic, institutional diversity. Then, they’ll need to help their organizations do the same.”

 

Read the full post here.

Photo credit:  Flickr, cc, by specialoperations


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Social Media Learning Lab
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The Hidden ROI of Social Media, making it worth your investment

The Hidden ROI of Social Media, making it worth your investment | Market to real people | Scoop.it

“How can I quantify my limited time and stretched resources and be assured of a return?”  … the short answer is, you can’t.  And, it still can be well worth it.

 

This short piece goes along with the ROI trend I've been curating in social media, and includes the author's two favorite examples of intangible but valuable return on social media investment

 

Excerpt:  

You cannot be assured of a definitive, predictable ROI from social media, no matter the size or your business or nonprofit.

 

This is true even if you are Proctor & Gamble, “the world’s largest marketer” (according toBusiness Insider) with a $10 billion annual ad budget.

 

P&G recently laid off 1,600 staffers in its marketing department to dedicate more resources to its social networks – but it’s impossible to know (yet) how this has affected sales.

 

1. Establishing yourself as a Thought Leader. Share your abundance of useful information that people want to read.  Examples with sizable social media followings:

 

Chris Brogan is a thought leader in social media, advising us in how to use social media and social networks to build relationships and deliver value. Becky McRay of Small Biz Survival. She writes about small business and rural issues, based on her own successes and failures.”  Read the full article here, including Julia Campbell's second example of engaging with dedicated Brand Ambassadors.
Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Storytelling, Social Media and beyond
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The Power of Story in Business Analysis

The Power of Story in Business Analysis | Market to real people | Scoop.it

Tell me if you’ve heard this one before – you’re on a project that was thrust on your stakeholder groups from high above.  They were insufficiently consulted during the problem definition phase, and they are now questioning everything during implementation. These stakeholders can’t get the project to be outright cancelled, but they can cause it to be ultimately unsuccessful if they don’t commit to putting their time and energy into ensuring that the solution being developed is appropriately used.

 

Sound familiar? It sure does to me! 

 

So what is a leader, manager, consultant to do? Add stories into the mix.

 

I like this article because it directly addresses the difficulties of project management, enrolling people to your cause, and how stories can be one of the remedies applied.

 

The author includes 3 steps to shift the situation and get your projects back on track. If you are stuck -- read this. 

 

And if you consult with others, tuck this list in your back pocket to keep your clients & project on track.

 

Read the full article here:

http://www.batimes.com/articles/the-power-of-story-in-business-analysis.html ;

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz, janlgordon
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Karen Dietz's comment, June 23, 2012 12:39 PM
Glad you like it Jan! Thanks for the comment. Have a great weekend :)
Venkadesh Narayanan's curator insight, March 14, 2015 6:58 AM

http://bacourse.com/

SNMinc WebGems's curator insight, April 24, 2015 3:39 PM

Storytelling always keeps your audience engaged.

Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Social Media Learning Lab
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The Hidden ROI of Social Media, making it worth your investment

The Hidden ROI of Social Media, making it worth your investment | Market to real people | Scoop.it

“How can I quantify my limited time and stretched resources and be assured of a return?”  … the short answer is, you can’t.  And, it still can be well worth it.

 

This short piece goes along with the ROI trend I've been curating in social media, and includes the author's two favorite examples of intangible but valuable return on social media investment

 

Excerpt:  

You cannot be assured of a definitive, predictable ROI from social media, no matter the size or your business or nonprofit.

 

This is true even if you are Proctor & Gamble, “the world’s largest marketer” (according toBusiness Insider) with a $10 billion annual ad budget.

 

P&G recently laid off 1,600 staffers in its marketing department to dedicate more resources to its social networks – but it’s impossible to know (yet) how this has affected sales.

 

1. Establishing yourself as a Thought Leader. Share your abundance of useful information that people want to read.  Examples with sizable social media followings:

 

Chris Brogan is a thought leader in social media, advising us in how to use social media and social networks to build relationships and deliver value. Becky McRay of Small Biz Survival. She writes about small business and rural issues, based on her own successes and failures.”  Read the full article here, including Julia Campbell's second example of engaging with dedicated Brand Ambassadors.
Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Social Media Learning Lab
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Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge | Market to real people | Scoop.it

"What's working in social business in 2012? Tech sales, marketing and the speakers circuits are doing well. Implementation and organizational change are lagging behind.  New leader & experts may be emerging in the gap."

 

There's helpful context in this piece in understanding social business in 2012, now that social media is becoming mainstream.   Transparency reigns.  Traditional organizational structures will not be able to keep up.

 

Excerpts:

 

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...new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

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...Pervasive connectivity changes organizational power structures, though the full effects of this take time to become visible. From a transparent environment new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

 

...Interconnected people and interlinked information flows, and these will bypass established structures and services. Work gets more democratic as it becomes visible to all.

 

Agile social businesses need people who can work in concert on solving problems, not waiting for direction from above. Management must ask: how can we help you work in this transparent environment? 

 

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Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

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In social networks we often learn from each other; modelling behaviors, telling stories and sharing what we know.  While not highly efficient, this is very effective for learning.

 

There is a need to model the new behaviors of being transparent and narrating one’s work.

 

Social business also requires power-sharing; for how long will workers collaborate and share if they cannot take action with their new knowledge and connectivity?

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

 

Once social technologies have been installed, modelling new work behaviors becomes the main organizational challenge.

 

Sources:   By @hjarche via @charlesjennings


Via juandoming, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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