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Future of Healthcare is Personalized Medicine - Diplomatic Courier

Future of Healthcare is Personalized Medicine - Diplomatic Courier | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Future of Healthcare is Personalized Medicine
Diplomatic Courier
How do we live healthier, create a more targeted and personalized approach to medicine, all while simultaneously cutting costs and eliminating waste?
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Journal of Hematology & Oncology | Abstract | Protein biomarkers ...

Journal of Hematology & Oncology | Abstract | Protein biomarkers ... | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
The current study evaluated the differential expression detected in the proteomic profiles of low risk- and high risk- ALL pediatric patients to characterize candidate biomarkers related to diagnosis, prognosis and patient ...
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GEN | Magazine Articles: Assay Development Driving Personalized Medicine

GEN | Magazine Articles: Assay Development Driving Personalized Medicine | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Demonstrating clinical utility is critical for moving tests out of research-use only mode.
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Edward Abrahams, President, Personalized Medicine Coalition ...

Edward Abrahams, President, Personalized Medicine Coalition ... | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
To start, could you introduce the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC), referring to its purpose, objectives and the inspiration behind its establishment? The PMC is an education and advocacy organisation that was ...
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Personalized Medicine Takes Aim At Common Diseases :: IN VIVO :: Elsevier Business Intelligence

Interesting article on the promise and challenges of predictive biomarker strategy for common diseases http://t.co/ds5iXWStcM
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Prepare For A Personalized, Preventative Health Care Revolution

Prepare For A Personalized, Preventative Health Care Revolution | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
If you were to pick a major industry about to see an incredible amount of change, you might choose health care. Vinod Khosla, the venture capitalist, says technology could replace 80% of what doctors do within 10 years.
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Julie Johnson appointed dean of the UF College of Pharmacy - University of Florida

Julie Johnson appointed dean of the UF College of Pharmacy - University of Florida | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Julie Johnson appointed dean of the UF College of Pharmacy
University of Florida
She leads the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium comprising more than 40 researchers from institutions worldwide.
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Exclusive Book Excerpt: Engage! Transforming Healthcare Through Digital ... - Forbes

Exclusive Book Excerpt: Engage! Transforming Healthcare Through Digital ... - Forbes | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Exclusive Book Excerpt: Engage! Transforming Healthcare Through Digital ...
Forbes
Transforming Healthcare Through Digital Patient Engagement. The book project was led by Jan Oldenburg who oversees patient engagement programs for Aetna.
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Seminar, April 30: Clinical Perspectives on Asthma Pharmacogenetics

Seminar, April 30: Clinical Perspectives on Asthma Pharmacogenetics | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
The UF College of Pharmacy Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research Seminar Series presents: “Clinical Perspectives on Asthma Pharmacogenetics”. Tuesday, April 30, 2013 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
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Biomarker Market is Estimated to Grow at a CAGR of 14.40% During the Study ... - PR Web (press release)

Biomarker Market is Estimated to Grow at a CAGR of 14.40% During the Study ... - PR Web (press release) | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Biomarker Market is Estimated to Grow at a CAGR of 14.40% During the Study ...
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UF Health receives $3.7 million to bring personalized medicine to more Floridians - University of Florida

UF Health receives $3.7 million to bring personalized medicine to more Floridians
University of Florida
GAINESVILLE, Fla.
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Health News - Molecular Subtyping of Breast Cancer Shows Potential of Personalized Medicine

Health News - Molecular Subtyping of Breast Cancer Shows Potential of Personalized Medicine | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it

"Writing in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Glück and colleagues compared the findings of molecular subtyping to those of traditional clinical pathology to determine breast cancer type, which is used to help guide treatment.

“Molecular subtyping of early-stage breast cancer with the MammaPrint and BluePrint tests identifies a group of patients who do not benefit from neoadjuvant (preoperative) chemotherapy,” said Glück, who is also a member of Sylvester’s Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute.

The study, “Molecular subtyping of early-stage breast cancer identifies a group of patients who do not benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy,” was published online in June, ahead of the journal’s print edition."


Via Susan Zager
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Carbon nanotube transistors designed to detect cancer biomarkers

Carbon nanotube transistors designed to detect cancer biomarkers | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
New technique could give conventional immunoassays a run for their money

 

Carbon-nanotube transistors could be used to detect minute quantities of disease biomarkers, such as the proteins implicated in prostate cancer, according to new experiments by researchers in the US. The technique could rival conventional methods when it comes to sensitivity, cost and speed.

 

Conventional techniques to detect proteins are typically based on some form of "immunoassay", with the most famous of these being enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This technique involves introducing an enzyme-modified antibody protein to an unknown amount of target molecule or protein, known as an antigen, and allowing them to bind together. Unreacted antibodies are washed away, leaving behind only antibody–antigen pairs.

 

The reaction can usually be detected by a colour change in the solution or by a fluorescent signal. The degree of colour change or fluorescence depends upon the number of enzyme-modified antibodies present, which in turn depends on the initial concentration of antigen in the sample.

 

Although such tests are routinely used in hospitals and clinics, they are quite long, taking several days or even weeks to complete. They are also costly, complicated to perform and can only detect single proteins at a time.

"Our new nanotube sensors are relatively simple compared to these ELISA tests," team member Mitchell Lerner, at the University of Pennsylvania, told physicsworld.com. "Detection occurs in just minutes, not days, and even at the laboratory scale, the cost of an array of 2000 such sensors is roughly $50 or 2.5 cents per sensor."

 

More importantly still, the sensors are much more sensitive to the target proteins in question. Indeed the Pennsylvania researchers showed that they could detect a prostate-cancer biomarker called osteopontin (OPN) at 1 pg/mL, which is roughly 1000 times lower than that possible with clinical ELISA measurements.


Detecting Lyme disease: The team, which is led by A T Charlie Johnson of Penn's Department of Physics and Astronomy, made its nanotube sensors by attaching OPN-binding antibodies to carbon-nanotube transistors on a silicon chip. Many proteins in the body bind very strongly to specific target molecules or proteins, and OPN is no exception. When the chip is immersed in a test sample, the OPN binds to the antibodies, something that changes the electronic characteristics of the transistor. Measuring the voltage and current through each device thus allows the researchers to accurately measure how much OPN there is in the sample.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Promise -- and Perils -- of Personalized Medicine

The Promise -- and Perils -- of Personalized Medicine | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it

Personalized medicine -- the ability to tailor therapies to patients' individual genetic characteristics -- has long been the holy grail of the life sciences industry. The effort has produced a string of recent successes, including a host of drugs targeted to people with specific genetic profiles, the European approval of the world's first gene therapy treatment, and a much-heralded leukemia treatment pioneered at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) that uses tweaked versions of patients' own cells to eliminate their cancer. While these advances are certainly exciting for patients, they raise a host of ethical, legal and financial challenges that people working in the field will need to address before personalized medicine can become a thriving business.


Via Complexity Digest
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The Wearable, Implantable, Personalized Future Of Medicine

The Wearable, Implantable, Personalized Future Of Medicine | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it

As doctors and scientists continue to make huge leaps in terms of genome sequencing and scanning devices, everything about your medical treatment is going to change.

 

As a child, you could always count on it, even after--especially after--you struck out playing T-ball, forgot your only line in the grade school play, and came home with chalk in your nose because you took the schoolyard dare. No matter what, your mom would hug you and tell you that you were special. Turns out, she was right.

 

Each of us is special and unique among the roughly 7 billion humans on this planet. We are the walking, talking instantiation of the 3 billion instances of four nucleotides (abbreviated GATC) that constitute our unique genome’s DNA. Equally important, the interplay of that DNA with the environment and our individual lifestyles determines our susceptibility and predisposition to diseases.

 

Suppose you’re now middle aged and chest pains send you to a physician. You can’t change your genetic profile; it’s your parents most basic and lasting gift. However, that fondness for double bacon cheeseburgers and butter pecan ice cream, and an exercise regime that is all-too-frequently limited to wistful looks at the running shoes in your closet, both have consequences. That’s why your mother also warned you to eat your vegetables and wash your hands, not that you listened.


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Hanson Zandi's curator insight, May 3, 2013 6:08 AM

Metabolic diagnostics will allow for early diagnosis of ilness for a more personalised approach to treatment. But is this really the future of medicine?

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Senators: Rural Hospitals Hobbled by Digital Divide

Members of the U.S.Senate Finance Committee suggest that Farzad Mostashari, MD, the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, has littl (National Coordinator has little idea of the challenges rural healthcare providers grapple with on...
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Pharmacogenetics of Chronic Pain and Its Treatment

Pharmacogenetics of Chronic Pain and Its Treatment | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Abstract. This paper reviews the impact of genetic variability of drug metabolizing enzymes, transporters, receptors, and pathways involved in chronic pain perception on the efficacy and safety of analgesics and other drugs used for chronic ...
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Digital tissue analysis, breast cancer diagnostic among South Carolina digital ... - MedCity News

Digital tissue analysis, breast cancer diagnostic among South Carolina digital ... - MedCity News | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Digital tissue analysis, breast cancer diagnostic among South Carolina digital ...
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Genomics and personalized medicine: Is it really different this time?

Genomics and personalized medicine: Is it really different this time? | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
It just may not be as easy or convenient as some would like to have us believe. We still have a long way to go.
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Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine, and You - National ...

Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine, and You. The course creator, Carrie Iwema of the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System, will be teaching the course at Temple's Ginsburg Library on Tuesday, ...
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Novel approaches for the identification of biomarkers of aggressive ...

The ability to distinguish indolent from aggressive prostate tumors remains one of the greatest challenges in the management of this disease. Ongoing efforts to establish a panel of molecular signatures, comprising gene ...
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Genomics And Personalized Medicine: Is It Really Different This Time?

Genomics And Personalized Medicine: Is It Really Different This Time? | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
I am even seeing routine television news shows and commentators talking about the promise of personalized medicine. A talk that I planned six months ago to deliver in a couple of weeks from now in Boston where I was ...
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Multidisciplinary Team Tackles Personalized Medicine for ...

Multidisciplinary Team Tackles Personalized Medicine for Melanoma Patients with Normal BRAF Gene. Anna Azvolinsky, PhD | 03 Jul 2013. A group of melanoma researchers and clinicians have received funding to address ...
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Assay Development Driving Personalized Medicine - Genetic Engineering News

Assay Development Driving Personalized Medicine - Genetic Engineering News | Mark's Healthcare Playpen | Scoop.it
Assay Development Driving Personalized Medicine
Genetic Engineering News
The change has also stirred up concern over the fate of molecular testing in the clinical setting as R&D initiatives press on in the pursuit of personalized medicine.
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Pharmacogenetics in the evaluation of new drugs: a multiregional regulatory perspective

Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 12, 103 (2013).

Via bricehoff
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