Marissa's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Queen Elizabeth I approves of Shakespeare's works ~Image

Queen Elizabeth I approves of Shakespeare's works                                                                      ~Image | Marissa's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Marissa Marsella's insight:

Queen Elizabeth I loved the arts and her enthusiasm for theatre put Shakespeare at the benefit. The Queen of England would often visit the theatre to watch her favorite works of Shakespeare at his Globe Theatre. She had her own seat in the balconies of the theatre; one of and if not the best seat to have in the circular entertainment center. Queen Elizabeth's love for arts could have greatly inspired shakespeare to write more of his scripts to perform for the pleasure of the Queen, who was very pleased with his works and was very well respected throughout the royalty of England. As an audience member of the Elizabethan Era, a spectator would most likely be honored to be within the same theatre as the queen, both for social and star-struck moments. A simple theatrical production could bring an entire society together, just like the wedding in Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" where many royal people and commoners united to make the wedding between their duke, Theseus, and his fiance, Hippolyta the best that it could be. This simple connection could show the everyday Elizabethan people their life in a different spectrum, just with different characters with different personalities, abilities, and dreams, such as those within the play, "A Midsummer Night's Dream". In the eyes of Queen Elizabeth I, this production could have portrayed to her exactly what she was governing on a political basis.

 

"Queen Elizabeth I Image." N.p., n.d. Web.

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Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream

This clip is a small parody of the Warner Bros reinterpretation of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream with their famous cartoons, the Animaniacs. This short video teases Shakespeare's tough poetry wording and "translates" it hysterically through the usage of the Warner Bros own characters. The Animaniacs represent the confused readers of Shakespeare's plays that must translate every line that is written in order to grasp the concept of the play's idea. The wording of the characters' lines can be difficult to translate into modern time's slang, however, the Animaniacs present the material in a comedic way through the Warner Bros' own interpretation of Shakespeare's works, allowing for the audience to get a laugh out of the small critisicm on Shakespeare's Elizabethan wording. The video clip can also greatly benefit some viewers of the play, for it is somewhat difficult to understand the language as quickly as it is spoken. Therefore, viewers can more easily grasp the concept lying within the text of "A Midsummer Night's Dream".

 

YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 1 Mar. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&gt;.

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ANONYMOUS SHAKESPEARE? ~Historical Article

ANONYMOUS SHAKESPEARE?                                          ~Historical Article | Marissa's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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This article touches upon the theory that Shakespeare did not completely write all of his works. Assisstants within the business of 14 to 16 people by the names of Middleton and George Wilkins to name a few could have also potentially helped with the writings of these plays. Modern day proof, forensics, and literary analysis of Shakespearean writings have evidence that these scripts could have more than possibly been written by other helpful sources that stood by Shakespeare's side in the business of theatre to further appeal to the audiences. This could be a factor as to why the female characters in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" hold both feminine and improper or heroic behaviors and characteristics. Due to the fact that more writers could have been present within the text of "A Midsummer Night's Dream", the mood of the scenes could have changed just as quickly as the writing style of each author, therefore making more difficult for the audience to discover the central emotion of the play, whether it be a comedy, a romance, or the conflicted feelings the writers had towards the rules of love in their days (such as Shakespeare having been forcefully wed to his wife, Anne Hathaway).

 

Berry, Ralph. "Anonymous Shakespeare." Ebscohost.com. Contemporary Review Company Ltd, 1 Dec. 2011. Web.

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Shakespeare steals from Chaucer ~Source

Shakespeare steals from Chaucer                        ~Source | Marissa's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Marissa Marsella's insight:

Geoffery Chaucer was a famous poet in medieval times, allowing for him to be an idol of Shakespeare's. Chaucer's 2249-line poem, "The Knight's Tale" proved to be an inspiration for Shakespeare's scripted poem, "A Midsummer Night's Dream", for many of the characters within both stories have almost identical situations while chasing after a lovely lady in a troublesome love triangle. In Shakespeare's work, a young lady by the name of Hermia is desperately in love with the character Lysander, who feels mutual towards her. However, Demetrius; the man who her father wishes for Hermia to wed is madly in love with her, while Hermia's best friend, Helena crushes upon Demetrius. In Chaucer's work, a similar love triangle occurs with two Theban warriors, Palamon and Arcite who both equally love Emily; the sister in-law of the Greek king, Theseus. Oddly enough, Theseus is the name of the Duke of Athens in Shakespeare's play, who is destined to wed the Amazon Queen; Hippolyta. In Chaucer's poetry, Theseus is to marry the Amazon Queen, Hippolyta. A familiar similarity to both plays concludes a bit of pladgurism on Shakespeare's part, as well as a wonderful inspiration for him to spark up the medieval plot with a twist of his own, including magical fairies, a theatrical wedding production of "Pyramus and Thisbe", (a story /play within a story just like "The Knight's Tale") and playful characters so that he could call it his own.

 

Turzynski, Linda. "The Knight's Tale." Ebscohost.com. Salem Press, Jan. 2002. Web.

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Diane Newberry's comment, March 11, 2013 3:25 PM
It's really been interesting to hear about this and other sources that Shakespeare borrowed plot material from. I was always amazed that he had so many great ideas for his large number of plays. I see now that he frequently just synthesized ideas and plots from other stories. It shows that as much as he was a play write, he was an entertainer, borrowing anything he thought would be interesting to an audience. His real skill was in the style, I think. His poetic dialogue presents the material in an entirely unique way.
Courtney Garrahan's comment, March 13, 2013 7:49 PM
I think it's really funny how our sources are so similar. It makes me think, like iv'e said in class when you presented, that maybe our sources are connected. And Diane, I totaly agree with you. Shakespeare was a GREAT play writer even though he took ideas from other pieces; He was not just a play writer but a entertainer.
Marissa Marsella's comment, March 13, 2013 10:24 PM
I love that part about what you stated, that he was a great writer even though he had ideas from outside sources. A good writer needs to be inspired by something in order to write a good piece that his audience can relate to and love, so why not; as a good writer should, incorporate other ideas from familiar sources in order to create a well-liked play. This also brings up your point as to how great of an entertainer he was, which I completely agree with. Shakespeare was phenomenal artist that could easily paint a wonderful scenery with his words, and he could also allow for his audience to connect their lives to the play on a personal level. Basically, what better source is there really than the everyday life and fantasies of his own audience?
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Nightingales That Roar: The Language of A Midsummer Night's Dream ~Literary Criticism

Nightingales That Roar: The Language of A Midsummer Night's Dream                              ~Literary Criticism | Marissa's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Marissa Marsella's insight:

This article deciphers the controversial text within Shakespeare's play of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and criticizes how the audience may receive mixed feelings about the play instead of fully understanding the mood of the different scenes that Shakespeare had intended. This may question the ability of Shakespeare's words to paint the scene of a play and allow his audience to feel the pain, happiness, reassurance, or even romance of the play. This article gives specific examples in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" that show the controversy that an Elizabethean audience may have felt during certain scenes in the play that lead more towards ambivalence rather than the emotions that should have been present within the audience during these specific scenes. This proves to be a modern problem as well, for even withinthe enviornment of a classroom, students stll greatly queestion the mood of certain sceneries within Shakespeare's famous play, "A Midsummer Night's Dream".

 

Halio, Jay L. "Nightingales That Roar: The Language of A Midsummer Night's Dream." Bloom's Literary Reference Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2013.

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